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Whatever happened with Turner's colorized movies?

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Whatever happened with Turner's colorized movies?

Old 06-18-03, 02:11 AM
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Whatever happened with Turner's colorized movies?

In the early to mid 80s, Turner was colorizing a ton of old black and white films, to the dismay of movie fans. Of course, this led the fans to buy up the black and white versions, and joe six-pack to pick up the colorized versions, so overall sales increased.

I haven't heard (or seen) anything about the movies since that time. Any idea of what finally happened?

If you have never seen one, it's weird. It just wasn't natural and certainly didn't "improve" the movie.
Old 06-18-03, 06:56 AM
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Obviously it finally occured to the folks at Turner that the muddy, crappy looking end result just wasn't worth the time and money, or the flak they were getting from the film community.
Old 06-18-03, 07:51 AM
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They went away, basically. I don't know if TCM shows them at all, but I know TBS and TNT don't. Staying away from the morality of it, technically the colorization was very poor and all they ended up doing was spending a lot of time and money on something that nobody really wanted. At best it was taken as a gimmick when it was released, not unlike a 3D version of the film. Not even your 'Joe 6 packs' were fans of it. Most were viewed out of curiosity but didn't go beyond that with anyone.

The process made the film fairly unwatchable to the average eye as the process involved didn't naturally color the film, it relied on taking scenes and painting them with a common color. In other words, a scene taking place in an office might be entirely brown aside from the clothing, at a shop everything might be yellow, again accept for clothing, etc. I remember the downfall being when they did a Frank Sinatra movie (I forget the title) and gave him brown eyes. There was great outcry about that and I believe it was the last movie they colorized. Sinatra of course was known as 'Old blue eyes'
Old 06-18-03, 11:04 AM
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Colorized films would mark the first moment I lost respect for Ted Turner, and as the years went on I became more convinced he was a moron. I remember seeing him as a guest on Arsenio Hall, and he was vehemently defending his belief that no one wanted to watch black and white movies anymore. (And Arsenio had the entire interview presented in black and white.) I seem to remember Turner's new-found convictions went to the most absurd extremes which included even colorizing B&W episodes of Gilligan's Island shown on TBS.

Anyways, not too long ago I noticed the Disney channel showing a colorized version of the Absent-Minded Professor. I don't even think you can find a B&W version on video or DVD. Its as if they want to pretend the original B&W never existed.

I admit, however, that perhaps the colorizing technique had improved over the years. When I first watched "Professor," I didn't realize it was originally B&W, and also didn't spot right away it was colorized like so many other movies I had seen in the past that appeared so obviously fake. This one looked more to me like it was merely a very old print of the film with faded color. (Disclaimer: Please note this is not an endorsement for colorization and I still hold true to the belief that if a movie was to be in color - they would have made it in color in the first place!)
Old 06-18-03, 11:08 AM
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The worst use of colorization I've seen is Night of the Living Dead. I recorded this one Halloween back in the 80s, thinking it was the normal b&w version. When I finally got around to watching it, it was in color... really awful color... I don't know who thought a candy colored NotLD was a good idea, but it makes a horror classic look like just another laughable b-movie released in the era.
Old 06-18-03, 11:13 AM
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The Criterion Laserdisc of Casablanca contains a couple minutes of the colorized version as a suplement. I hope the new DVD has it. It was a mistake bordering on blasphemy, but it's interesting to see none the less.

Does anyone know all the titles that were colorized? Casablanca obviously. I've also seen They Were Expendable (they couldn't make the water look natural) and The Longest Day.
Old 06-18-03, 12:12 PM
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I guess I'm alone on this, but I'm not nearly as opposed to colorization as others seem to be. I'd even go so far as to say - given the films I prefer (War/Westerns) - I am very much pro-colorization.

I'm a big fan of John Wayne and Errol Flynn. Turner colorized quite a few of their black and white films. In addition those just mentioned by DVDTalker Pants (They Were Expendable and The Longest Day), I recall that these Wayne films were also colorized (not a complete list, just those I seem to recall as being colorized):

Fort Apache
Rio Grande
The Fighting Seabees
The Fighting Kentuckian
Sands of Iwo Jima
Back to Bataan
Flying Tigers
Allegheny Uprising

Among Flynn films:
They Died With Their Boots On
The Charge of the Light Brigade
Objective Burma!
Captain Blood

I just think most, if not all, of the above play better in color (even if not the most natural looking) vs. black & white.

While I'd agree that a number of classic films (I'm thinking of Cagney gangster films in particular) are better presented in the original black & white, I'd have to go pro-colorization for a lot of the old War/Western films (with some exceptions (not that these were ever colorized but just as an example) such as The Ox-Bow Incident, maybe too High Noon, among others).

One more point before I forget, I would definitely be in favor of DVD releases of these films having the black & white version on one side of the disc and the colorized version on the other (like they already do with many current releases having widescreen on one side and full-screen the other).

If someone has it available, I too would be interested in reading a complete list of the films colorized by Turner.

Off to find some body armor..........
Old 06-18-03, 12:15 PM
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king kong was a travesty.
Old 06-18-03, 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by flixtime
Off to find some body armor..........
You better find it fast

While being a curiosity to see, I don't see how anyone can endorse a colorized version. High Noon better in color???!!! Are you joking? You say you prefer color, but the colorized versions looked awful! They looked worse than any color process.
Old 06-18-03, 01:24 PM
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I just can't see the merit in colorization... even the "tinted" version of "Metropolis" looked horrible to me. Can you imagine "Citizen Kane" in color, say? It would destroy half of what makes the film so special. I'm glad the colorization "fad" is one that seemed to die off quickly.
Old 06-18-03, 01:48 PM
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I have a colorized version of "It's A Wonderful Life". It's pretty bad....
Old 06-18-03, 02:07 PM
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In one of his last interviews, Orson Wells said "Tell Ted Turner to keep his crayons away from my movies." A great quote.
Old 06-18-03, 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by Pants
Does anyone know all the titles that were colorized?
According to the IMDb:

Alternate Versions Searcher
Here are the entries containing colorized

"Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955)
- Many of Hitchcock's droll introductions were colorized and reused in the
"Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1985)
- Hitchcock's introductions are colorized versions of segments originally
"As the World Turns" (1956)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Bandstand" (1952)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Bewitched" (1964)
- Colorized versions of the black and white episodes have been syndicated.
"Captain Kangaroo" (1955)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Charge Account" (1960)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Concentration" (1958)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Doctor Who" (1963)
B&W, a combination of B&W and color (for US syndication), and colorized. This
"Dream Girl of '67" (1966)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Gilligan's Island" (1964)
- Colorized versions of the first season's black and white episodes have been
"Hollywood Palace, The" (1964)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"House Party" (1952)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"I Dream of Jeannie" (1965)
- Colorized versions of the first season's black and white episodes have been
"I've Got a Secret" (1952)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"McHale's Navy" (1962)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Merv Griffin Show, The" (1962)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Pat Boone-Chevy Showroom, The" (1957)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Peyton Place" (1964)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Popeye" (1956)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Price Is Right, The" (1956)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Say When!" (1961)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"To Tell the Truth" (1956)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Toni und Veronika" (1970)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Where the Action Is" (1965/I)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Z Cars" (1962)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
"Zorro" (1957)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
'Hyp-Nut-Tist', The (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
'Neath the Arizona Skies (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
90. Geburtstag oder Dinner for One, Der (1963) (TV)
- a computer colorized version produced by the NDR in 1999
Abilene Town (1946)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Absent Minded Professor, The (1961)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Adventures of Popeye (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Africa Squeaks (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
After the Thin Man (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Agapes kai kaimoi (1971)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Ali-Baba Bound (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Allegheny Uprising (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Alona on the Sarong Seas (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Alpine Antics (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Angel and the Badman (1947)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Angels with Dirty Faces (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Annabelle Serpentine Dance (1894)
- Also available in a hand-tinted colorized version.
Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Axe Me Another (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Babes in Toyland (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Baby Wants a Bottleship (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer, The (1947)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Bachelor Mother (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Back to Bataan (1945)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Backlash (1947)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Barn Dance, The (1929)
- Also available in a computer-colorized version.
Barnyard Broadcast, The (1931)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Barnyard Concert, The (1930)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Bataan (1943)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Battleground (1949)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Bells of St. Mary's, The (1945)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Betty Boop's Trial (1934)
- The Republic Video verson, besides being colorized, is censored; it lacks the
Beware of Barnacle Bill (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Birthday Party, The (1931)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Bishop's Wife, The (1947)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Blow Out, The (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Blue Steel (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Bombardier (1943)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Boom Boom (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992, with a computer adding color to a new
Boom Town (1940)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Brats (1930)
- When released in a computer colorized version, the following scene was
Bridge Ahoy! (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Broncho Kid, The (1920)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Building a Building (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Bulldozing the Bull (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Butterfly Dance (1897)
- Also available in a hand-tinted colorized version.
Bühne frei für Marika (1958)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Calling Dr. Porky (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Camping Out (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Captain Blood (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Cartoons Ain't Human (1943)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
a Mona Lisa painting that shows a blackfaced woman. In the colorized version,
drawing. The colorized version edits out the hand, making it seem as if the
Case of the Stuttering Pig, The (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Castaway, The (1931)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Cent mille dollars au soleil (1963)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Chain Gang, The (1930)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Charge of the Light Brigade, The (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Chewin' Bruin, The (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Chicken Jitters (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Chimp, The (1932)
- When released to a computer colorized version, the opening titles are
Choose Your 'Weppins' (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Christmas Carol, A (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Clean Shaven Man, A (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Confusions of a Nutzy Spy (1943)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992, with a computer adding color to a new
Cops Is Always Right (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Coy Decoy, A (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Crimson Ghost, The (1946)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Crisis (1950)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Crosby, Columbo, and Vallee (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Crossfire (1947)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Curly Top (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Curse of the Cat People, The (1944)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Customers Wanted (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Cyrano de Bergerac (1950)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Daffy Doc, The (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Daffy Duckaroo, The (1942)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Daffy's Southern Exposure (1942)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Dance Contest, The (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Dark Command (1940)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Dawn Rider, The (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Desert Trail, The (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Dimples (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Dinner at Eight (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Dish Ran Away with the Spoon, The (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Dizzy Divers (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Dogs Is Dogs (1931)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Dokuritsu kikanjûtai imada shagekichu (1963)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Dream Walking, A (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Duck Hunt, The (1932)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Faites sauter la banque! (1963)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Federal Hill (1994)
required the film to be colorized for the video release, against director
director to be colorized. Both versions (colour and B/W) are now available on
Fighting Kentuckian, The (1949)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Fighting Seabees, The (1944)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Film Fan, The (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Fish Tales (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Fishin' Around (1931)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Fixer Uppers, The (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Flame of Barbary Coast (1945)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Flesh Eaters, The (1964)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Flies Ain't Human (1941)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Flying Tigers (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
For Better or Worser (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Fort Apache (1948)
- There is a computer colorized version.
Freddy the Freshman (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Gallopin' Gaucho, The (1928)
- Also available in a computer-colorized version.
General, The (1998)
- Home video version is colorized.
Get Rich Quick Porky (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Ghosks Is the Bunk (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Giantland (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Goitia, un dios para sí mismo (1988)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Gold Diggers of '49 (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Goonland (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
- The colorized version that airs on Cartoon Network does not include the shot
Goopy Geer (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Great Big Bunch of You, A (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Guerra e il sogno di Momi, La (1916)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Gulliver Mickey (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Gunga Din (1939)
- Also shown in a computer-colorized version
Happy Birthdaze (1943)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Heidi (1937)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Helpmates (1932)
- Scenes deleted in the 1986 colorized version were: Ollie and Stan talking on
the room at the mess, and in the colorized verison, just stills of the mess
Henpecked Duck, The (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Her Sweetest Memory (1913)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
His First Case (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Hold the Wire (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Hospitaliky (1937)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Hunchback of Notre Dame, The (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Hungry Goat, The (1943)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
I Like Mountain Music (1933/I)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
I Love a Parade (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
I Never Changes My Altitude (1937)
- Also available in a colorized version.
I Wanna Be a Life Guard (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
I Wish I Had Wings (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
I Yam Lovesick (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
I'll Never Crow Again (1941)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
I've Heard the Mermaids Singing (1987)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Impatient Patient, The (1942)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
In Old California (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
In This Our Life (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Injun Trouble (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
- The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer adding
Introduction to Scientology (1984) (V)
segment, and the interview footage is colorized.
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
- There is a colorized version by Republic Pictures 80 minutes in length.
It's a Wonderful Life (1946)
- Also available in two different computer colorized versions one by Hal Roach
It's an Ill Wind (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
It's Got Me Again! (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
It's the Natural Thing to Do (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Jeep, The (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Jeepers Creepers (1939/II)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Jezebel (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Jour de fête (1948)
parts of the black and white film were computer colorized in order to
Jön az öcsém (1919)
- Also available in a hand-tinted colorized version.
Key Largo (1948)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Kickin' the Conga Round (1942)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
King Kong (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Kit Carson (1940)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Kristopher Kolumbus Jr. (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Kulay dugo ang gabi (1966)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Last Days of Pompeii, The (1935)
- A colorized version was made of this film in 1990.
Learn Polikeness (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening, The (1993) (VG)
for the game boy color, a camera man, and was colorized.
Let's Celebrake (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Let's Get Movin' (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Let's You and Him Fight (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Little Beau Porky (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Little Swee' Pea (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Lone Stranger and Porky, The (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Longest Day, The (1962)
- There is a digitally remastered colorized version of the film.
Lost and Foundry (1937)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Lucky Texan, The (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mad Doctor, The (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mad Dog, The (1932)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Made for Each Other (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mail Pilot, The (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Man from Utah, The (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Man on the Flying Trapeze, The (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Marry-Go-Round, The (1943)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Matrimonial Martyr, The (1916)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Me Feelins Is Hurt (1940)
- Also in a colorized version.
Me Musical Nephews (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Meet John Doughboy (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992, with a computer adding color to a new
Megfagyott gyermek, A (1921)
- Also available in a hand-tinted colorized version.
Michel Strogoff (1926)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey Cuts Up (1931)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey Plays Papa (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey's Good Deed (1932)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey's Kangaroo (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey's Mechanical Man (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey's Nightmare (1932)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey's Revue (1932)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mickey's Service Station (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mighty Joe Young (1949)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Milk and Money (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Miracle on 34th Street (1947)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Moonlight for Two (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Morning, Noon and Night Club (1937)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Moulin maudit, Le (1909)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mutiny Ain't Nice (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
My Artistical Temperature (1937)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
My Pop, My Pop (1940)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Människor möts och ljuv musik uppstår i hjärtat (1967)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Naughty Neighbors (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Never Kick a Woman (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Night of the Living Dead (1968)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
- A computer colorized version has the TV screen the characters are watching,
Notes to You (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Olden Days, Ye (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Olive's $weep$take Ticket (1941)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Olive's Boithday Presink (1941)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
One More Time (1931)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
One Step Ahead of My Shadow (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Operation Pacific (1951)
- Republic Pictures released a colorized version on vidoe.
Organ Grinder, The (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Our World (1967) (TV)
- A colorized version of the Beatles' segment appears in
Pagan Moon (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Paneless Window Washer, The (1937)
- Also in a colorized version.
Paradisio (1961)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Patient Porky (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Pearl of Death, The (1944)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Perfect Day (1929)
- When released in a computer colorized version, the scene following Uncle
Pest Pilot (1941)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Phantom of the Opera, The (1925)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Picador Porky (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Picnic, The (1930)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Pied Piper Porky (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Pigskin Palooka, The (1937)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Pilgrim Porky (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Pip-eye, Pup-eye, Poop-eye an' Peep-eye (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Plane Dippy (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Pleased to Meet Cha! (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Plumbing Is a 'Pipe' (1938)
- Also in a colorized version.
Polar Pals (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Popeye Meets William Tell (1940)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Porky & Daffy (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Porky and Gabby (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky and Teabiscuit (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky at the Crocadero (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
dancing from the "Guy Lombago" gag. In the colorized version, Cab Calloway
Network does not edit this in both the B/W and the colorized version.
Porky in Egypt (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky in the North Woods (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky in Wackyland (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky Pig's Feat (1943)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Porky the Fireman (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky the Giant Killer (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky the Gob (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky the Rain-Maker (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky the Wrestler (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Ant (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Badtime Story (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Baseball Broadcast (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Bear Facts (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Porky's Building (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky's Cafe (1942)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Double Trouble (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky's Duck Hunt (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Porky's Five & Ten (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Garden (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Hare Hunt (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Hero Agency (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Hired Hand (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Hotel (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Last Stand (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky's Midnight Matinee (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Movie Mystery (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Porky's Moving Day (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Naughty Nephew (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Party (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Pastry Pirates (1942)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky's Pet (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky's Phoney Express (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Picnic (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Pooch (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Porky's Poor Fish (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky's Poppa (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Poultry Plant (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Preview (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992, with a computer adding color to a new
Porky's Prize Pony (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Railroad (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Porky's Road Race (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
- The colorized version that played on Nickelodeon cut the short scene where a
Porky's Romance (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Snooze Reel (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Spring Planting (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Super Service (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Porky's Tire Trouble (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Prehistoric Porky (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Pride of the Yankees, The (1942)
- A colorized version is available.
Prince and the Pauper, The (1937)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Problem Pappy (1941)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Puppy Love (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Pups Is Pups (1930)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Puss n' Booty (1943)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Queen Was in the Parlor, The (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Rachel and the Stranger (1948)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Randy Rides Alone (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Red Headed Baby (1931)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Riders of Destiny (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Rio Grande (1950)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Robin Hood: The Movie (1991) (TV)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Robinson Crusoe, Jr. (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Rover's Rival (1937)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Sagebrush Trail (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Sands of Iwo Jima (1949)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Scalp Trouble (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Scarlet Street (1945)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Scrooge (1951)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Seasin's Greetinks! (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Shaggy Dog, The (1959)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Shanghaied (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Shanghaied Shipmates (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Shanty Where Santy Claus Lives, The (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Shrine of Happiness, The (1916)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Shuffle Off to Buffalo (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Slap Happy Pappy (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Smile, Darn Ya, Smile! (1931)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Sock-a-Bye, Baby (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Sour Puss, The (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Spider and the Fly, The (1931)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Spinach Overture, The (1935)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Spinach Roadster, The (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Star Packer, The (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Stealin' Ain't Honest (1940)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Steeplechase, The (1933)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Study in Skarlit, A (1915)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Suddenly (1954)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Sultana, The (1916)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Tall in the Saddle (1944)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
- Two different companies have released a colorized version on video, Nova
Teen-Age Strangler (1965)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Terror by Night (1946)
- Also available in a colorized version from Hal Roach Studios, that runs 63
They Died with Their Boots On (1941)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Thing From Another World, The (1951)
- A colorized version was released in color on VHS in 1989 by Turner Home
Three Strangers (1946)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Three's a Crowd (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Timid Toreador, The (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
Too Hot to Handle (1938)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Too Weak to Work (1943)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Towed in a Hole (1932)
- Also available in computer colorized version
Trail Beyond, The (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Twisker Pitcher, The (1937)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Two-Gun Mickey (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Village Smithy, The (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1995, this time with a computer
Vim, Vigor and Vitaliky (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Voyage à travers l'impossible, Le (1904)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Wake of the Red Witch (1948)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Wake Up the Gypsy in Me (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Way Out West (1937)
computer-colorized version.
We're in the Money (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
We, the Animals - Squeak! (1941)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1992, this time with a computer
West of the Divide (1934)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Westward Whoa! (1936)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992, with a computer adding color to a new
What -- No Spinach? (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
What Price Porky (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
White Heat (1949)
- Also Available in a Colorized Version.
White Zombie (1932)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Who's Who in the Zoo (1942)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992, with a computer adding color to a new
Wholly Smoke (1938)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1968 by having every other frame traced over
method. The cartoon was colorized again in 1990, this time with a computer
Wimmen Is a Myskery (1940)
- Also available in a hand-colorized version.
Wimmin Hadn't Oughta Drive (1940)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Winds of the Wasteland (1936)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Wise Quacks (1939)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
Wood-Peckin' (1943)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Wotta Nitemare (1939)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)
- Also available in a computer colorized version.
You Don't Know What You're Doin' (1931)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
You Ought to Be in Pictures (1940)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new
You're Too Careless with Your Kisses (1932)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Young and Healthy (1933)
- This cartoon was colorized in 1992 by Turner Entertainment Company, with each
Your Cheatin' Heart (1964)
Mother, and Billie Jean, Hank's 2nd Wife). Also Shown on TV In a Colorized
Zombies of the Stratosphere (1952)
- Also available in a colorized version.
Old 06-18-03, 04:06 PM
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Thanks, although that list doesn't name two colorized movies I've seen: Casablanca and They Were Expendable

Looks like they did a lot of cartoons. I've never seen a colorized cartoon. what is this "coloring over every other frame" thing all about?
Old 06-18-03, 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by Pants
Thanks, although that list doesn't name two colorized movies I've seen: Casablanca and They Were Expendable

Looks like they did a lot of cartoons. I've never seen a colorized cartoon. what is this "coloring over every other frame" thing all about?
I don't recall ever seeing any colorized cartoons either.

As for the 'coloring over every other frame' thing":

http://cztoondb.tripod.com/cztoondb/...unes/index.htm
A process known as retracing colorization was used on most of the B&W Looney Tunes. No Bosko or Buddy* cartoons were colorized, nor did nearly all the rare one-shot Looney Tunes. The key stages of the process were done in Manhattan and Hollywood by Color Systems Inc. In some cartoons, flies would be trapped under cels and show up in the shot. Psychedelic color choices, such as red irises and red shadows were made. Typographical errors were sometimes made. Some cartoons actually lacked scenes due to them not being animated or being severely out-of-sync. These cartoons have shown up on TV and in theaters. Like the later colorizations for Turner, the Looney Tunes' retraced counterparts were probably shot on inferior 16mm stock and in Eastmancolor, as opposed to rich Technicolor. While many consider these colorizations as awful, keep in mind that this was the only way to colorize the cartoons at the time.

That's not all, folks! In 1990, Warner Bros. started to have all of the cartoons which were redrawn in color colorized via digital technology. Thanks to the colorizations, the cartoons themselves were drastically cleaned up. The 1990 colorizations oddly took many color choices from the original redrawn versions, but at least the original artwork was left...just with color added. In 1992, a second batch of colorizations was made with better results. This batch resulted in a few more color choices, but had a mostly sepia and brown tint to backgrounds. The best group of colorizations was done in 1995. The color work was done with excellent detail and an amazing amount of color choices. Due to the computer colorizations, over a dozen cartoons were colorized for the first time since they were left alone in the late 1960's. These colorizations are commonly shown on TV, while some "redrawns" still are shown. Cartoon Network has exclusive rights to the cartoons at this time and can also be found on VHS & laserdisc. The redrawn colorized cartoons can be found on public domain videotapes frequently, despite these versions still being under copyright.
http://cztoondb.tripod.com/cztoondb/laddqaart.htm
A Short Q&A With Fred Ladd

Fred Ladd is mostly known for his dubbed versions of imported cartoons such as Astro Boy and Gigantor. What is more obscurely known is that he produced all of the original retraced colorizations of the Looney Tunes, Popeye cartoons, and Betty Boops (and many more). This is a candid interview with Mr. Ladd about colorization...

The Colorized Cartoon Database: When redrawing the cartoons, did you use color cartoons from the same era at the studio (such as referencing the color remake of Notes To You, Back Alley Op-Roar for the colorization) for reference, consult original artists, or even look at artwork for the cartoons?

Fred Ladd: Yes, all the above. For examples: When coloring Li'l Abner, we checked the old Sunday color comics and found that Mammy Yokum & Li'l Abner wore 'yaller' boots, Daisy Mae's blouse was pink-with-red heatrs, etc. In 'Popeye', Bluto's shirt was navy blue, his pants were brown. For Porky's colors, we referenced old color, animated cartoons

CCD: What were some of the harder sequences or cartoons to redraw?

Ladd: The tough part of every cartoon are the "effects"--rainstorms, and even dissolves from one scene to another. Holding the colors from the outgoing scene while introducing new colors from an incoming scene has special problems.

CCD: Many unofficial lists of the colorized cartoons have surfaced on the internet. It's pretty much assumed that 78 Looney Tunes were colorized for WB. Yet, there has been rumors that more were colorized. Was the entire B&W library of Warner Bros. cartoons owned by them at the time colorized?

Ladd: Yes, 78 Looney Tunes was our very first big project. Years later, 25 more were added to the package. We believe that the 25 added had copyrights that had expired or were about to expire. Adding color qualifies a picture for a new copyright. We assume all the pictures were owned by Warner. CDD Note: These 25 likely included the Bosko Looney Tunes and Harmon-Ising Merrie Melodies done for Radio & TV Packagers Inc.

CCD: Was there any guide to what colors were to be used? In some cartoons, such as Jeepers Creepers, Porky states that the ghost is white and transparent, despite the ghost being yellow and opaque in the colorized version. Also, some had red shadows and red iris-outs.

Ladd: Studios generally left color selections to us. All were pleased by our selection, never a complaint about color selection. MGM especially had high praise for our color work on 'Popeye', probably because the coloring got unanimous rave reviews from the press. The red iris-outs were purely stylistic and welcomed by the studios as a way of helping them emphasize that these pictures were a long way away from b-&-w. (Note: At the time, the Popeye cartoons were with Turner when they were at MGM)

CCD: Were these cartoons intended for theatrical distribution? Also, color processes and film used (like 16mm or Eastmancolor, etc.)

Ladd:

No. A relatively few pictures were enlarged by us, from our standard 16mm to 35mm,
but in general we shot 16mm for TV release. Eastman was unhappy in those days with its own 16mm negative and urged us to use Kodachrome, which we did--in the beginning. Later, at Eastman's urging, we switched to its Ektachrome process. and loved it, because the process favors warm colors--which we also prefer.

CCD: How did you develop the colorization process? Was it just an accident or an experiment?

Ladd: We own the b-&-w "Gigantor" series and originally tried to develop, in 1967, a feasible way to convert the series to color. Our early experiments were observed in the film laboratory,-which we both used,- by people at Warner Brothers, and that led to our being requested to set aside "Gigantor" for the moment, and go ahead, instead, with 'Porky Pig'. We did, you know the rest.
Redrawn Colorized (78)

Plane Dippy (1936)
Fish Tales (1936)
Porky The Rainmaker (1936)
Porky's Poultry Plant (1936)
Porky's Moving Day (1936)
Little Beau Porky (1936)
The Village Smithy (1936)
Porky The Wrestler (1937)
Porky's Road Race (1937)
Picador Porky (1937)
Porky's Romance (1937)
Porky's Duck Hunt (1937)
Porky And Gabby (1937)
Porky's Super Service (1937)
Porky's Badtime Story (1937)
Porky's Railroad (1937)
Get Rich Quick Porky (1937)
Porky's Garden (1937)
Rover's Rival (1937)
The Case Of The Stuttering Pig (1937)
Porky's Double Trouble (1937)
Porky's Hero Agency (1937)
Porky's Poppa (1938)
Porky's Phoney Express (1938)
Porky's Five And Ten (1938)
Porky's Hare Hunt (1938)
Injun Trouble (1938)
Porky The Fireman (1938)
Porky's Party (1938)
Porky's Spring Planting (1938)
Porky And Daffy (1938)
Wholly Smoke (1938)
Porky's Naughty Nephew (1938)
The Daffy Doc (1938)
Porky The Gob (1938)
The Lone Stranger And Porky (1939)
It's An Ill Wind (1939)
Porky's Tire Trouble (1939)
Porky's Movie Mystery (1939)
Chicken Jitters (1939)
Porky And Tea Biscuit (1939)
Kristopher Kolumbus Jr. (1939)
Polar Pals (1939)
Porky's Picnic (1939)
Scalp Trouble (1939)
Porky's Hotel (1939)
Jeepers Creepers (1939)
Naughty Neighbors (1939)
Pied Piper Porky (1939)
Porky The Giant Killer (1939)
The Film Fan (1939)
Africa Squeaks (1940)
Ali-Baba Bound (1940)
Slap Happy Pappy (1940)
The Chewin' Bruin (1940)
Porky's Baseball Broadcast (1940)
Patient Porky (1940)
Calling Dr. Porky (1940)
Prehistoric Porky (1940)
The Sour Puss (1940)
Porky's Hired Hand (1940)
The Timid Toreador (1940)
Porky's Snooze Reel (1941)
Porky's Bear Facts (1941)
Porky's Ant (1941)
A Coy Decoy (1941)
Porky's Prize Pony (1941)
We, The Animals, Squeak! (1941)
The Henpecked Duck (1941)
Notes To You (1941)
Robinson Crusoe, Jr. (1941)
Porky's Midnight Matinee (1941)
Porky's Pooch (1941)
Porky's Cafe (1942)
Daffy's Southern Exposure (1942)
The Impatient Patient (1942)
The Daffy Duckaroo (1942)
Porky Pig's Feat (1943)
Puss N' Booty (1943)

Digitally Colorized (104)

Gold Diggers of '49 (1936)
Plane Dippy (1936)
Alpine Antics (1936)
Boom Boom (1936)
The Blow Out (1936)
Westward Whoa (1936)
Fish Tales (1936)
Shanghaied Shipmates (1936)
Porky's Pet (1936)
Porky The Rainmaker (1936)
Porky's Poultry Plant (1936)
Porky's Moving Day (1936)
Milk And Money (1936)
Little Beau Porky (1936)
The Village Smithy (1936)
Porky In The Northwoods (1936)
Porky The Wrestler (1937)
Porky's Road Race (1937)
Picador Porky (1937)
Porky's Romance (1937)
Porky's Duck Hunt (1937)
Porky And Gabby (1937)
Porky's Building (1937)
Porky's Super Service (1937)
Porky's Badtime Story (1937)
Porky's Railroad (1937)
Get Rich Quick Porky (1937)
Porky's Garden (1937)
Rover's Rival (1937)
The Case Of The Stuttering Pig (1937)
Porky's Double Trouble (1937)
Porky's Hero Agency (1937)
Porky's Poppa (1938)
Porky At The Crocadero (1938)
What Price Porky (1938)
Porky's Phoney Express (1938)
Porky's Five And Ten (1938)
Porky's Hare Hunt (1938)
Injun Trouble (1938)
Porky The Fireman (1938)
Porky's Party (1938)
Porky's Spring Planting (1938)
Porky And Daffy (1938)
Wholly Smoke (1938)
Porky In Wackyland (1938)
Porky's Naughty Nephew (1938)
Porky In Egypt (1938)
The Daffy Doc (1938)
Porky The Gob (1938)
The Lone Stranger And Porky (1939)
It's An Ill Wind (1939)
Porky's Tire Trouble (1939)
Porky's Movie Mystery (1939)
Chicken Jitters (1939)
Porky And Tea Biscuit (1939)
Kristopher Kolumbus Jr. (1939)
Polar Pals (1939)
Porky's Picnic (1939)
Scalp Trouble (1939)
Wise Quacks (1939)
Porky's Hotel (1939)
Jeepers Creepers (1939)
Naughty Neighbors (1939)
Pied Piper Porky (1939)
Porky The Giant Killer (1939)
The Film Fan (1939)
Porky's Last Stand (1940)
Africa Squeaks (1940)
Ali-Baba Bound (1940)
Pilgrim Porky (1940)
Slap Happy Pappy (1940)
Porky's Poor Fish (1940)
You Ought To Be In Pictures (1940)
The Chewin' Bruin (1940)
Porky's Baseball Broadcast (1940)
Patient Porky (1940)
Calling Dr. Porky (1940)
Prehistoric Porky (1940)
The Sour Puss (1940)
Porky's Hired Hand (1940)
The Timid Toreador (1940)
Porky's Snooze Reel (1941)
Porky's Bear Facts (1941)
Porky's Preview (1941)
Porky's Ant (1941)*
A Coy Decoy (1941)
Porky's Prize Pony (1941)
Meet John Doughboy (1941)
We, The Animals, Squeak! (1941)
The Henpecked Duck (1941)
Notes To You (1941)
Robinson Crusoe, Jr. (1941)
Porky's Midnight Matinee (1941)
Porky's Pooch (1941)
Porky's Pastry Pirates (1942)
Who's Who In The Zoo (1942)
Porky's Cafe (1942)
Daffy's Southern Exposure (1942)
The Impatient Patient (1942)
The Daffy Duckaroo (1942)
Confusions Of A Nutzy Spy (1943)
Porky Pig's Feat (1943)
Scrap Happy Daffy (1943)
Puss N' Booty (1943)
Old 06-18-03, 04:40 PM
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http://cztoondb.tripod.com/cztoondb/popeye/index.htm
In the 1950's, Paramount sold the cartoons to a company called Associated Artists Productions. This company, more well known as "AAP" also purchased Warner Bros' entire color cartoon library, as well as their pre-1950 features.** In the late 1960's, these films ended up with United Artists Television. Even later, United Artists (UA) merged with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) in 1981. Ted Turner bought the entire MGM-UA library in 1986 and quickly sold the United Artists part back to MGM. Turner kept the United Artists Television package and also the entire MGM library. The current MGM company owns its post-1986 MGM films and also all but a few of the United Artists-released feature films.

Shortly after Turner's purchase, he decided that it would be a great financial idea to colorize most of the black & white films in the United Artists TV library. The live-action features such as Yankee Doodle Dandy and Casablanca were controversially colorized using the aid of computer imaging systems. The computer colorizations were very well done by CST Entertainment, Inc. For some odd reason, the black & white Popeye cartoons were not colorized via computers. Instead, they were colorized using re-tracings made from frame blow-ups just like the 1968 colorizations of the Looney Tunes. Despite the redrawn colorizations seeming to be cheaper than computer colorization, the overall price was rumored to be the same. The later colorizations paid more attention to actual tracing, which they did succeed, but a handful of timing, color, and animation mistakes occured. With this process, it really was hard to avoid. In all, 117 Popeye cartoons were colorized.

Cartoon Network is the sole broadcaster of the classic Popeye cartoons and airs both the black & white and colorized versions of the 1933-1943 cartoons. The Popeye Show, on Sunday nights, is the main source for the originals. The colorized versions are shown on Toonheads and The Acme Hour at various times. Boomerang will often air a 3 or 4-hour block of Popeye cartoons, usually with a large amount of redrawn colorizations. Check their website for current schedules.

A Chronological List of Colorized Popeye Cartoons:
Popeye The Sailor (1933)
I Yam What I Yam (1933)
Blow Me Down (1933)
I Eats My Spinach (1933)
Seasin's Greetinks! (1933)
Wild Elephinks (1933)
Sock-A-Bye Baby (1934)
Let's You And Him Fight (1934)
The Man On The Flying Trapeze (1934)
Can You Take It (1934)
Shoein' Hosses (1934)
Strong To The Finich (1934)
Shiver Me Timbers (1934)
Axe Me Another (1934)
A Dream Walking (1934)
The Two-Alarm Fire (1934)
The Dance Contest (1934)
We Aim To Please (1934)
Beware Of Barnacle Bill (1935)
Be Kind To "Aminals" (1935)
Pleased To Meet Cha! (1935)
The Hyp-Nut-Tist (1935)
Choose Your Weppins (1935)
For Better Or Worser (1935)
Dizzy Divers (1935)
You Gotta Be A Football Here (1935)
King Of The Mardi Gras (1935)
The Adventures Of Popeye (1935)
The Spinach Overture (1935)
Vim, Vigor, And Vitaliky (1936)
A Clean Shaven Man (1936)
Brotherly Love (1936)
I-Ski Love-Ski You-Ski (1936)
What, No Spinach? (1936)
I Wanna Be A Lifeguard (1936)
Let's Get Movin' (1936)
Never Kick A Woman (1936)
Little Swee'pea (1936)
Hold The Wire (1936)
The Spinach Roadster (1936)
I'm In The Army Now (1936)
The Paneless Window Washer (1937)
The Organ Grinder's Swing (1937)
My Artistical Temperature (1937)
Hospitaliky (1937)
The Twisker Pitcher (1937)
Morning, Noon, And Night Club (1937)
Lost And Foundry (1937)
I Never Changes My Altitude (1937)
I Likes Babies And Infinks (1937)
The Football Toucher Downer (1937)
Proteck The Weakerist (1937)
Fowl Play (1937)
Let's Celebrake (1938)
Learn Polikeness (1938)
The House Builder Upper (1938)
Big Chief Ugh-Amugh-Ugh (1938)
I Yam Love Sick (1938)
Plumbing Is A "Pipe" (1938)
The Jeep (1938)
Bulldozing The Bull (1938)
Mutiny Ain't Nice (1938)
Goonland (1938)
A Date To Skate (1938)
Cops Is Always Right (1938)
Customers Wanted (1939)
Leave Well Enough Alone (1939)
Wotta Nitemare (1939)
Ghosks Is The Bunk (1939)
Hello, How Am I? (1939)
It's The Natural Thing To Do (1939)
Never Sock A Baby (1939)
Shakespearian Spinach (1940)
Females Is Fickle (1940)
Stealin' Ain't Honest (1940)
Me Feelin's Is Hurt (1940)
Onion Pacific (1940)
Wimmin Is A Myskery (1940)
Nurse Mates (1940)
Fightin' Pals (1940)
Doing Impossikible Stunts (1940)
Wimmin Hadn't Oughta Drive (1940)
Puttin' On The Act (1940)
Popeye Meets William Tell (1940)
My Pop, My Pop (1940)
Poopdeck Pappy (1940)
Problem Pappy (1941)
Quiet! Pleeze (1941)
Olive's $weep$takes Ticket (1941)
Flies Ain't Human (1941)
Popeye Meets Rip Van Winkle (1941)
Olive's Boithday Presink (1941)
Child Psykolojiky (1941)
Pest Pilot (1941)
I'll Never Crow Again (1941)
The Mighty Navy (1941)
Nix On Hypnotricks (1941)
Kickin' The Congra Round (1942)
Blunder Below (1942)
Fleets Of Stren'th (1942)
Pip-Eye, Pup-Eye, Poop-Eye An' Peep-Eye (1942)
Olive Oyl And Water Don't Mix (1942)
Many Tanks (1942)
Baby Wants A Bottleship (1942)
You're A Sap, Mr. Jap (1942)
Alona On The Sarong Seas (1942)
A Hull Of A Mess (1942)
Scrap The Japs (1942)
Me Musical Nephews (1942)
Spinach Fer Britain (1943)
Seein' Red, White 'n' Blue (1943)
Too Weak To Work (1943)
A Jolly Good Furlough (1943)
The Hungry Goat (1943)
Happy Birthdaze (1943)
Wood-Peckin' (1943)
Cartoons Ain't Human (1943)
Her Honor, The Mare (1943)


A Chronological List of Colorized Betty Boop Cartoons:
1931:
Silly Scandals
Bimbo's Initiation
Bimbo's Express
Minding The Baby
Mask-A-Raid
Jack and the Beanstalk
Dizzy Red Riding Hood
1932:
Any Rags
Boop-Oop-A-Doop
Minnie The Moocher
Swim Or Sink
Crazy Town
The Dancing Fool
A Hunting We Will Go
Admission Free
The Betty Boop Limited
Rudy Vallee Melodies
Stopping The Show
Betty Boop's Bizzy Bee
Betty Boop, M.D.
Betty Boop's Bamboo Isle
Betty Boop's Ups and Downs
Betty Boop Fo President
I'll Be Glad When You're Dead You Rascal You
Betty Boop's Museum
1933:
Betty Boop's Ker-Choo
Betty Boop's Crazy Inventions
Is My Palm Read
Betty Boop's Penthouse
Snow White
Betty Boop's Birthday Party
Betty Boop's May Party
Betty Boop's Big Boss
Mother Goose Land
Popeye The Sailor*
The Old Man of the Mountain
I Heard
Morning, Noon, and Night
Betty Boop's Halloween Party
Parade of the Wooden Soldiers
1934:
She Wronged Him Right
Red Hot Momma
Ha! Ha! Ha!
Betty In Blunderland
Betty Boop's Rise To Fame
Betty Boop's Trial
Betty Boop's Life Guard
There's Something About a Soldier
Betty Boop's Little Pal
Betty Boop's Prize Show
Keep In Style
When My Ship Comes In
1935:
Baby Be Good
Taking The Blame
Stop That Noise
Swat The Fly
No! No! A Thousand Times No!
A Little Soap and Water
A Language All My Own
Betty Boop and Grampy
Judge For A Day
Making Stars
Betty Boop With Henry
1936:
Little Nobody
Betty Boop and The Little King
Not Now
Betty Boop and Little Jimmy
We Did It
A Song For A Day
More Pep
You're Not Built That Way
Happy You and Merry Me
Training Pigeons
Grampy's Indoor Outing
Be Human
Making Friends
1937:
House Cleaning Blues
Whoops! I'm A Cowboy
The Hot Air Salesman
Pudgy Takes A Bow-Wow
Pudgy Takes A Fight
The Impractical Joker
Ding Dong Doggie
The Candid Candidate
Service With A Smile
The New Deal Show
The Foxy Hunter
Zula Hula
1938:
Riding The Rails
Be Up To Date
Honest Love and True
Out of the Inkwell
Swing School
Pudgy and the Lost Kitten
Pudgy The Watchman
Sally Swing
On With The New
Pudgy In Thrills and Chills
1939:
My Friend The Monkey
So Does An Automobile
Musical Mountaineers
The Scared Crows
Rhythm On The Reservation
Old 06-18-03, 04:41 PM
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Originally posted by Dimension X
According to the IMDb:
The Doctor Who listed here was indeed colorized, but it's not an abomination. The orignal work was indeed in color, but the broadcast masters were destroyed in the late 60's. The only surviving copies of those episodes were black and white transfers (and some NTSC tapes that were badly in need of some color correction).

It was attempted as an experment to see if the old episodes could be restored - but was abandonded as too expensive (at the time).
Old 06-18-03, 05:02 PM
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Originally posted by Dimension X
According to the IMDb:
Those aren't all Turner colorized though, Turner didn't do anywhere near that many films.
Old 06-18-03, 05:13 PM
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I always wondered why the Porky Pig cartoons looked so crappy when I was a kid. They used to stutter and the color was always off. Now I know. I was in my 30s before I realized they made Black & White Looney Tunes.
Old 06-18-03, 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by renaldow
Those aren't all Turner colorized though, Turner didn't do anywhere near that many films.
I was too lazy to edit the list.
Old 06-18-03, 05:52 PM
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Scott1458:
king kong was a travesty.


That's the one movie I always think of in regards to colorization. The one thing I share in common with my father is that KING KONG is our favorite movie. However, he PREFERS the colorized version. It is the version he has on VHS in his library. At least once a year we get into a big argument about how terrible I believe it is, and how much better the colorized version is to him. When I told him about the KING KONG DVD finially coming out he said, "It better have the real version" ie, the colorized abortion.
Old 06-19-03, 07:08 AM
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Originally posted by Pants
You better find it fast
Is it safe to come in yet? Hey, that wasn't so bad (though perhaps some of the familiar faces here might be giving me a free pass on my somewhat pro-colorization stance). I half-expected to see a post in the Feedback & Support forum to have a pro-colorization post become cause for banishment from the forum (j/k).

I'm certainly more inclined to stand with you guys on films like Citizen Kane, It's a Wonderful Life, etc. It's just that I truly feel most War and Western films benefit more than not from colorization. My earlier comments might have been a little unclear but I was saying that of course there might be some exceptions - Ox-Box Incident and High Noon - to my pro-colorization stance on Western/War films (note: the 2 aforementioned example were not colorized, I am just using them as an example of films I like which, in all likelihood, are better in their original black & white). As an aside, for some reason I seem to recall that High Noon was colorized at some point but I guess I'm mistaken.

And..... thanks Dimension X for posting all those lists. Also, I think you and I touched very briefly upon this topic of colorization in a thread from some months ago. If I remember correctly I was commenting on how I much preferred the colorized version of Flynn's They Died With Their Boots On because I felt color helped the film (highlighted even more Custer's non-traditional light-brown coat vs. the standard dark blue uniform, etc.). You were both gracious and diplomatic in your response.

Has anyone here watched a film called Lonely are the Brave? It's sort of a modern-Western from 1962 (yet filmed in black & white) and starred Kirk Douglas (terrific performance from Douglas by the way). on the film. But while watching it I kept thinking that I wish someone would colorize it. There were some magnificent shots of the landscape that I truly wish were in color. Plus there were some scenes with characters looking through binoculars where what they were looking at was very difficult for the viewer to pick up. I think colorization would have made it a little easier. And "yes", I do realize that in the real world sometimes things are difficult to pick up while looking through binoculars. Anyway, I'm not trying to stir things up, but I'm just being candid since it came to my mind so recently. I feel that, if the technology were available and/or cost-efficient at the time Directors like Michael Curtiz and Raoul Walsh would have filmed titles like Captain Blood, Charge of the Light Brigage, and They Died With Their Boots On in color. Naturally if someone like Orson Welles says to leave his work in black & white and/or if the film was shot in black & white for artistic reasons then by all means leave it as is. I most certainly could be wrong, but I don't think every Director of classic film would be so adverse to having their work colorized since they might have chosen to shoot in color themselves if it were either available at the time or cost-efficient. Shooting in color was expensive and subject to budgetary restrictions in the early days, right?

While we're at it, would someone know the answer as to why John Ford filmed 1 part (She Wore a Yellow Ribbon) of the his cavalry trilogy in color and the other 2 (Rio Grande, Fort Apache) in black & white. Any reason in particular? Was it for artistic reasons? The films were released over 3 consecutive years with the middle one being in color.

And to dig myself in even deeper, I'll pick The Longest Day since it is a film many might be familiar with. I like the colorized version because seeing the various uniform colors as opposed to shades of gray, I feel adds more to the characters. Uniforms and being able to tell who's who is a key component (I suppose) in battle, I think the colorized version better represents that. Plus the fiery explosions, etc. Also, I can't think of a film in particular (Gunga Din or Charge of the Light Brigade maybe), but seeing troops of the British Empire in colorized red uniforms is more appealing to me than just plain black & white. Though, in this case, I'm not sure if the soldiers in Gunga Din and Charge of the Light Brigade had red uniforms or khaki desert-color ones.

I would agree though that most genres in classic film (gangster, monster, etc.) might better be left in their original forms.

I don't think we ever addressed Heat's (the original thread starter) question as to what ever happened to these colorized films. I'm guessing they are simply tucked away - along with their black & white counterparts - for now (and forever?). The TBS and TNT channels used to show a lot of these classic films on a regular basis some years ago but times have changed and their programming has shifted to fare for the new generation (which makes sense from a ratings point of view) so we are getting more showings of modern classics like The Shawshank Redemption, The Mummy, The Patriot, etc., with most of the classic films now relegated to TCM (except for the occasional Eastwood/Wayne marathon on TBS/TNT). I can't remember the last time I saw a Flynn film on TBS/TNT. I do recall seeing a colorized version of The Longest Day on Cinemax not too many months ago.

Anyway, that's about all for now. I simply wanted to expand/clarify a little on my earlier stance.
Old 06-19-03, 11:19 AM
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Originally posted by flixtime
As an aside, for some reason I seem to recall that High Noon was colorized at some point but I guess I'm mistaken.
Pants already pointed out that the IMDb list is incomplete, so it's likely you did see a colorized version of High Noon.
Originally posted by flixtime
I feel that, if the technology were available and/or cost-efficient at the time Directors like Michael Curtiz and Raoul Walsh would have filmed titles like Captain Blood, Charge of the Light Brigage, and They Died With Their Boots On in color. Naturally if someone like Orson Welles says to leave his work in black & white and/or if the film was shot in black & white for artistic reasons then by all means leave it as is. I most certainly could be wrong, but I don't think every Director of classic film would be so adverse to having their work colorized since they might have chosen to shoot in color themselves if it were either available at the time or cost-efficient. Shooting in color was expensive and subject to budgetary restrictions in the early days, right?
In an effort to be "gracious and diplomatic" , I'll quote this article from 1986:
Last week, Turner Broadcasting System released a list of more than 100 movies that it has commissioned Color Systems Technology to computer-colorize over the next few years, including such classics as "Casablanca," "The Maltese Falcon," "Yankee Doodle Dandy," "A Night at the Opera" and the 1946 "The Postman Always Rings Twice."

This week, an angry committee of film directors reacted. In a strongly worded letter to Gilbert Cates, president of the Directors Guild of America, the 18 members of the president's committee urged that the guild put itself on record against the "cultural butchery" of colorizing and that it should use "all resources at its disposal to stop this process in its path."

Cates, reached in Vancouver where he is directing a film, said he agrees with the recommendation of his committee and will urge approval of it when the DGA national board meets next month.

"It (colorizing) is a process of dissembling the historical and artistic fabric of our landmarks," Cates said. "Once you say you can add color, why can't you add a different score, add shots, re-edit it, or do anything you want?"

Cates' comment was mild compared to those of some colleagues.

Woody Allen: Determining the colors that people wear, or what colors the walls are and so on are major creative decisions. . . . To have a group of people from the outside making those decisions is criminal and ludicrous.

Billy Wilder: Those fools! Do they really think that colorization will make "The Informer" any better? Or "Citizen Kane" or "Casablanca"? Or do they hope to palm off some of the old stinkers by dipping them in 31 flavors? Is there no end to their greed?"

Joe Dante: Black and white was an art form in the '40s. . . By changing them, they are tampering with history. It's the death knell of an entire art form.

Elliot Silverstein, chairman of the DGA committee on colorizing, provided the most graphic opinion. When it was pointed out that the successful halting of colorizing might ultimately cost DGA members residuals from TV syndication and video sales, he said, "We're dealing with moral and professional issues here, not a commercial one. These fellows are lifting their legs on people's work.

"We certainly care about the directors' feelings, but we are not going to change our plans," said TBS Executive Vice President Bob Wussler. "That boat has left the harbor. The ship has sailed."

There are two colorizing companies thriving in this new industry. Color Systems Technology, based in Marina del Rey, and Colorization Inc., a Toronto-based subsidiary of Hal Roach Studios. Their techniques differ, but both essentially use computers to assign predetermined colors to shades of gray in each scene.

Colorization has colored such films as Laurel and Hardy's "Way Out West," the 1937 "Topper," with Cary Grant and Constance Bennett, and Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life." CST started with "Miracle on 34th Street" and just completed "Yankee Doodle Dandy," the first of 150 films that it will do, at an average cost of $183,000, for Ted Turner.

The directors opposed to coloring complain that: It changes the mood, subverts the original concepts, alters subtle lighting and shadowing techniques, redirects the viewer's focus away from where the director intended it to be and presumes to add authenticity where a distorted reality may well have been the director's intention.

But their major objection is that coloring is prima facie re-editing of an artist's work, a form of mutilation that is no different from putting a fig leaf on Michelangelo's David or rouging Mona Lisa's cheeks.

"To change someone's work without any regard to his wishes shows a total contempt for film, for the director and for the public," said Woody Allen, one of the few directors with the clout to make his films in black and white when he chooses. "I think all of the guilds that have any regard for film as an art form should take major action to prevent it. That's what guilds are for, to protect the integrity of the artist," he said.

The colorizers cite several defenses for the process.

They say that black-and-white films are getting harder to syndicate on television, both at home and abroad, and that by colorizing the films, they are airing works that would otherwise not be seen.

They say that the booming video market is virtually shut off from black-and-white classics, that young VCR users won't rent or buy anything that is not in color.

And they argue that most of the old films were done in black and white because color was either not available to the directors or the studios wouldn't go the additional cost.

This hardly explains the presence of John Huston's "The Maltese Falcon" and "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" on Turner's list. Director John Huston is still around and he is on the record against having them colored. And it doesn't explain the presence of films like Jacques Tourneur's "Out of the Past," a moody film noir that uses its black-and-white cinematography as a major character.


Nevertheless. . . .

"I have no artistic problem coloring black-and-white films," said Charles Powell, executive vice president of Color Systems Technology. "We're movie people, not carpetbaggers. We really care. And the contracts are pouring in."

Powell and Color Systems Technology consultant Gene Allen, the Oscar-winning art director of "My Fair Lady," say they use great care in determining colors for everything from flesh tones to room colors. The dissenting directors say that the art director on "My Fair Lady" might not have been director Michael Curtiz's first choice for "Casablanca" and that it's an outrageous presumption for him to think he can translate the film to color without destroying the intended mood.

"They keep saying they care and that they want to consult," Silverstein said. "Consult with whom? Most of the film makers are dead. It doesn't seem right for people whose main interests are archeological to roll right over their works."

Powell said the directors do not own their films and that the public should determine whether films are colorized or not.

"The choice lies with the public," Powell said. "The public loudly and clearly indicates a preference for color."

Hal Gaba, vice chairman of Colorization Inc. said the directors are promoting "the grossest form of censorship" by trying to take away the public's right to view these films in color.

"To tell the public that they can't watch it in color, to have the audacity to try to legislate this form of censorship is really shocking," Gaba said. "To carry their thinking out logically, they shouldn't allow color films to be shown on black-and-white television or films made for the big screen to be shown on television at all."

Powell said that the directors should take a look at the process before complaining about it and said he thinks people are getting Color Systems Technology's work mixed up with that of its competitor's. The directors quoted here said the quality of colorization is irrelevant. The point is that the films were made in black and white by a team of film makers working in a specific medium, with its limitations and its advantages.

"I might see a colorized film and not be offended by it," said Milos Forman, who won an Oscar last year for "Amadeus." "That's not the point. The point is creative rights. Coloring films is like putting aluminum siding on a 17th-Century castle."

"I have no quarrel with the mechanics," Woody Allen said. "That has nothing to do with it. If a director is around and says he'd like to have it colorized, fine. If not, no one should be allowed to change it, in any way, ever."

Allen now has it in his contract that his films cannot be altered without his permission, and he refuses to let his moves be "panned and scanned" (trimmed at the top and sides to adapt to the shape of a TV screen). He said he would rather lose money on sales of tapes and TV syndication than have people watch a different movie from the one he made.

The commercial rationale that people won't watch black-and-white films or rent black-and-white tapes may be a self-fulfilling prophecy now that they can play the computer keyboard game and magically convert them. It's all a bit condescending, Allen said.

"What they are really saying is that the public are morons, brainless people who can't enjoy a film if it's in black and white. They need colors because they don't have the brains to respond to content. . . . It is not true. The world has responded to 'Citizen Kane' and will continue to respond to it.

"They don't care about the public or the films. They will argue you deaf, dumb and blind with philosophical reasons for doing it. In the end, what they're saying is, 'We'll tell you anything, but we want the money.' "

While Color Systems Technology keeps busy with its TBS orders, Colorization Inc. is keeping busy with films taken from the Hal Roach Studios library, or from the public library. There are an estimated 17,000 black-and-white films in the public domain and Colorization Inc. is helping itself. By colorizing them and copyrighting the color version, it plans to build its own library, a scheme that the DGA's Cates says adds insult to the injury.

Among the titles in Colorization's young library are "Angel and the Badman," starring John Wayne, "Suddenly," with Frank Sinatra, and George Romero's "The Night of the Living Dead," a 1968 horror film that slipped into the public domain because someone failed to copyright it.

It may be hard to get the Rainbow Ship back in the harbor. Television, with its Cuisinart style of editing, has provided plenty of precedence for third-party interference. And the public may be hard to rouse. Colorizing is a far more seductive abuse.

The truth is that the quality of computer color is not as aesthetically awful as we might expect, and it will get better. Whether they actually get Sydney Greenstreet's hair color right in "The Maltese Falcon" will go unnoticed by most of us.

But no matter how much care goes into the selection of colors, there will always be the overriding commercial concerns. Wilson Markle, head of Colorization Inc., tells the story of a client who rejected a Western that his company had colored using authentic desert brown for the backdrop. Markle's colorizers changed the brown to green and sent it back and all was well.

"They didn't say anything about the desert," Markle said, "but that's the only thing we changed. . . . They said, 'That's great.' "

Green deserts may become the norm in old Westerns, green being so much more entertaining than brown. Who knows what colorful thoughts lurk in the minds of computer keyboard artists?

In the colorized version of "It's a Wonderful Life," the wardrobe of Gloria Grahame's Violet, the budding vamp of Bedford Falls, was colored violet, turning her into a visual pun that director Frank Capra may or may not have found amusing.

No one could deny that that was art direction, nearly 40 years after the fact. And no one can guarantee that it won't be done again. That's entertainment.

One of the films on Turner's to-be-colored list is "Your Cheatin' Heart," a 1964 biographical movie about country singer Hank Williams. One of its stars is Red Buttons. If even one of his buttons is red. . . .

John Voland contributed to this story.

© 1986 The Times Mirror Company
Old 06-19-03, 11:25 AM
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The examples you pick are funny. You pick two films from 1962, Lonely are the Brave and The Longest Day. These films were made well into the hayday of color. When these films were made more than half of H'wood's output was in color. Unlike in the old days when black and white was (pretty much) your only choice, these films had a choice, and they were chosen to be shot in black and white. The Longest Day is supposed to resemble the documentary look of war photographer footage.
Old 06-19-03, 01:36 PM
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The colorization thing didn't really work because even if you make them holographic, most people will not want to watch films that are older.

Most of the colored stuff was done in the late 80s and early 90s, and is rarely shown anymore. The only recent stuff I've seen done were the colored versions of the first season of "I Dream of Jeannie" and the first and second seasons of "Bewitched", which were completed in 2000 and have aired a lot internationally and in the US on The Hallmark Channel. Interestingly, both series were recently picked up by TV Land again and they have chosen to run the black and white originals.

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