DVD Talk Talk about DVDs and Movies on DVD including Covers and Cases

storing dvds question

Old 05-12-06, 04:32 AM
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storing dvds question

I noticed on amazon they started letting customers post pics

noticed this when looking at Simpsons Season 6

http://g-images.amazon.com/images/G/...657e5010.L.jpg


Besides the discs, that isnt a good way to store dvds in order to preserve the flimsy casings, is it? (particularly for tv boxsets)
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Old 05-12-06, 05:33 AM
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No, not a good way - looks like that "Millennium" on the bottom is taking quite a pounding (at least it isn't the Homer head on the bottom.) Side by side is the way to go, as opposed to vertical stacking.
I'm really running out of space to store my DVDs, and would like to keep them stored so they're all nicely preserved. I think a clearout is on the horizon...

Dazza.
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Old 05-12-06, 07:46 AM
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Related question: in regular keepcases, what're the risks of storing discs in a vertical stack like that? Will they warp? I know there are DVD stands sold to store DVDs horizontally (like the stack in the photo) as opposed to vertically (like books on a bookshelf), so I wouldn't think it'd be an issue...but some of my overflow that doesn't fit on my stands anymore is currently being stored cover to the sky, so I just want to be sure.

-JP
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Old 05-12-06, 11:42 AM
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i thought warpage (gravity in general) always affects discs, though not necessarily preventing playback. it was more troublesome with heavier discs like laserdiscs, but i've come across cds in used shops where the discs were warped (the center sat higher than the outer edge). plus wouldn't there be some heat buildup in the bottom of the stack?
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Old 05-12-06, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Dazza
Side by side is the way to go, as opposed to vertical stacking.
isn't that an oxymoron? i don't believe there is a such thing as vertical stacking.

Last edited by OldBoy; 05-12-06 at 01:43 PM.
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Old 05-12-06, 04:46 PM
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Scott, you're thinking of "horizontal". Vertical is up, thus the stacking.
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Old 05-12-06, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by darmok
i thought warpage (gravity in general) always affects discs, though not necessarily preventing playback. it was more troublesome with heavier discs like laserdiscs, but i've come across cds in used shops where the discs were warped (the center sat higher than the outer edge). plus wouldn't there be some heat buildup in the bottom of the stack?
I'm confused (not neccessarily by your post specifically); if gravity is pulling on the discs strongly enough to warp them in a vertical stack, why wouldn't it be pulling on the discs strongly enough to warp them in a different way in a side-by-side arrangement? Perhaps "warp" wouldn't be the right word, but wouldn't the same amount of gravity be pulling downward on the DVD, thus creating stress around the middle where it's being held? Possibly even warping that center hole somewhat?

I'm sure somebody more sciency than I can explain to me why I'm wrong.
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Old 05-12-06, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by jmj713
Scott, you're thinking of "horizontal". Vertical is up, thus the stacking.


vertical: | | | | |

horizontal:
___
___
___

thus, you can't stack top to bottom vertically, only horizontal. right?

Last edited by OldBoy; 05-12-06 at 05:52 PM.
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Old 05-12-06, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by scott1598

vertical is ///////
horizonatal is ___
___
___
___
Vertical is "^", horizontal (regardless of how you want to spell it) is ">"

Stack vs File. Like books.
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Old 05-12-06, 07:56 PM
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Stacking would seem the most economical for regular cases since they wont get ruined, and vertically for wear and tear on delicate boxes. I'm thinking of tv sets, any cardboard case where you're more worried about the corners. Keeping the shrinkwrap on will keep the corners in a 'set' dent as opposed to multiple wear just byy gravity and moving space around the shelves.

The trouble I have is similar to the pic above where if you stack horizontal,(on its side) you have empty space unused on top, if you have 'high ceiling' shelves.

You can save more space if you have more depth enough to put another row behind a horizonal set, or even stack a few underneath the vertical ones. The problem is access to the ones in the back, or unable to see what titles you have without taking the whole thing apart.

I tend to stack titles in the back that I probably wont watch for a while or ever again, which are things I should just get rid of instead of storing at all. The most troblesome ones are the ones you have to vertically stand, so that space gets more scarce the more tv/boxsets you purchase.

I have a friend who stacks everything, regardless of wear and tear. He just doesnt care about the boxes or any future resale value.
Needless to say anything he borrows from me is disc-only in a jewel case.
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Old 05-12-06, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by The Cow
Vertical is "^", horizontal (regardless of how you want to spell it) is ">"

Stack vs File. Like books.
A stack can only be vertical. The easiest way to "stack" DVDs is to lay them flat (horizontal) and place them on top of each other. If you arrange the DVDs vertically (standing up), you can still "stack" (aka balance) them, but your stack is unlikely to achieve much height (assuming a free standing stack with a base of a single DVD case).
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Old 05-13-06, 02:38 AM
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If you make economical use of your storage space, you don't have to worry about "stacking" DVDs to maximize the amount of the DVDs you can get into a given storage area. (In other words, don't use shelves that are significantly taller than a DVD case.)
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Old 05-13-06, 05:40 AM
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You shouldn't store DVD's flat that way. Because the entire weight of the disc is supported at the centre hub, over (long) periods of time, the edges can droop and warp under the disc's own weight.

You have to bear in mind that a DVD is actually a precision optical product that is spun at extremely high speeds in players. Any warpage causing a disc to be improperly balanced is bad news.

And while some people dismiss these concerns saying that any warpage is likely to take longer than the format will survive, but I'd rather not take the risk myself.

All the manufacturers recommend that discs be stored upright.

It seems a shame to actually ignore that advice.

It's bad enough to see the abuse handed out to DVD's by stores by the way they "store" and "handle" them!
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Old 05-13-06, 10:41 AM
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i think i get it now. it can be confusing though.
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Old 05-13-06, 11:02 AM
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I've stored my discs vertically for over 5 years. I've never encountered a warped disc, even the poor guy at the bottom of the stack. Ditto for CDs in jewel cases, for nearly 20 years. It's phooey, store them however you want.

However, I can see the argument for not storing snapper cases or anything non-amaray keepcase vertically. At the very least, the snapper cases don't stack neatly in the vertical direction and the case will warp (not the disc), though it's usually the cases toward the middle of the stack, as the one on the bottom stays nice and flat.
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Old 05-13-06, 12:52 PM
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theres probably a storage solution to suit every possible requirement or cost point : from cardboard boxes to really nice bespoke lockable metal cupboards as used by professional studios ... you just need to have a clear criteria and go searching.
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Old 05-13-06, 02:07 PM
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To clarify the semantic confusion:

Items are stacked in a vertical direction, and filed in a horizontal direction (as the Cow said).

Where the confusion is arising in this discussion is that the item in question (DVD cases) are actually being stacked in a horizontal orientation (ie - laying flat rather than on end). You could not stack single DVD cases in a vertical orientation, unless you had a uncanny knack for balancing things. However, you could presumably stack rows of DVD cases in a vertical orientation (ie - how library book stacks are created).

I hope this clears up the issue.

Also: I am relatively certain that stacking horizontally oriented DVD's is not going to cause them any harm, unless perhaps you arrange them in giant, precariously balanced piles. The disks themselves are so lightweight that the effect of gravity would be pretty much negligible, even over long periods of time. This is assuming the cases themselves are sturdy enough to withstand any accumulated weight of disks piled on top of them. In other words, I probably would not recommend stacking them from ceiling to floor, as that could potentially cause a stress issue for the lowest disks in the stack (not too mention making it darn hard to get at the disks on the bottom).
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Old 05-16-07, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Nebiroth
You shouldn't store DVD's flat that way. Because the entire weight of the disc is supported at the centre hub, over (long) periods of time, the edges can droop and warp under the disc's own weight.
Sorry to bump this old thread, but it seemed more appropriate than starting a new one on a subject that I'm sure has been covered many times here (a search revealed a few threads and different theories, but no hard answers).

Anyway, I'm interested if anyone has any actual experience with this warping effect (I know albums are very prone to this, and I wonder if DVDs suffer- in an either real or imaginary way- as a result of this).

I ask because I've been stacking most of my DVDs for about 3-4 years now. It started because it was the most pragmatic way of fitting them onto my shelves, and as my collection has grown (I have about 1500 now), I just simply can't fit them any other way with the room I have available.

I'm NOT worried about the wear on the cases (most of my box sets are on my top shelf standing upright) but only on the discs themselves. FWIW, I've noticed any problems yet with any DVDs I've watched yet. But if it's a real problem, obviously I will figure out a different way to store them. So is this warping thing a myth, or an actual concern? Thanks for any input.
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