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suggestions for a receiver/amplifier

Old 08-22-00, 03:00 AM
  #1  
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Hi

A friend of mine and I want to change our receivers but we are not sure what would be the correct one.

My friend has a Harman Kardon receiver and he thinks he needs a better one (one with dts and compositive video)

I own a Sony STR-DE925 that support Dolby digital, THX and DTS (no tested yet) but it doesnt have input/output s-video or compositve video. I also hate the way the equalizers works and I do not like the remote control.

We both, think it would be a good option to consider Denon or Yamaha receiver but we are not sure.

What do you think? what would you suggest to us.

Thanks in advance for all your suggestions

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Old 08-22-00, 04:30 AM
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Are you sure about composite video??? Most receivers have composite video. A good number also have S-video. A more limited number would also have component video.

Typically, most people would rank the video in the following ascending order:

Composite -- fair
S-video -- good
Component -- excellent

Upgrading your receiver depends on your music preferences, size of listening room, music/HT ratio, other system components especially speakers, required features (e.g., flexible bass management, 5 channel stereo, DTS, THX Select or Ultra, outstanding 2 channel music quality, EX, DSP's) etc.

Yamaha receivers are generally regarded by many to be forward or bright sounding. So, if you have bright speakers, Yamaha would not likely be a good choice IMO. Generally, Denon receivers are more neutral sounding. Other good brands are the Sony DB and ES series, Onkyo, Pioneer Elite and Marantz. Prices vary from US$300 to several thousand $.

In addition to the above questions, what's your budget for a new receiver?

If you can provide some information to these questions, I am sure that you would be able to get some more detailed recommendations on which receivers to consider.

Dave

[This message has been edited by DavidY (edited August 22, 2000).]
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Old 08-22-00, 11:47 AM
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hmmm... a THX receiver without S-vid or composite? I HIGHLY doubt it...

In any case, go Marantz - Awesome for HT, and Music and a truly brilliant remote
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Old 08-22-00, 12:33 PM
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DavidY, is exactly right. You need to answer his questions before you can get any good advice.

People often forget that the receiver is only one part of a system. The room, receiver, dvd player, speakers, and to a lesser extent the cabling all contribute to the sound. No matter how "good" an individual component is or has been reviewed, it must work well within your system. For example, a "warm" sounding receiver will not typically mate well with "dark" speakers. This is one reason that trying equipment at home before buying is so important.

In the end, you should let your ears decide which component is right for you; don’t base your decision on advice or reviews alone.


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Old 08-22-00, 01:50 PM
  #5  
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Oooops my mystake, I mean component instead of compositive.

My receivers is a Sony STR-DE925 and, as I said, it support Dolby Digital, THX and DTS, it has some digital inputs (3 f.o and 1 coaxial), it doesnt have any s-video or component input or output (REALLY!!!)

The equipment connected to this receivers is as follows:
-Sony KSP-S61 TV
-A Sony DVD s360 (modified to accept zones 1 and 4)
-A Sony A50 Directv receiver
-Infinity QPS-1 Rear Speakers
-Infinity cc-1 central speaker
-Bose front speakers
-Onkyo subWoofer

The main and only use is TV and MOVIES!!!!, the room is about 4 by 4 m.

What I hate about my receiver is, poor equalizer, complicated remote control (I love in screen menus) and no s-video/component outputs.

About my friend, he has a Sony Vega TV, a Harman Kardon receiver, and a infinity speakers (MTS-10) set with a JBL subwoofer. His room is about 4 by 6 m

So, what do you think, what do you suggest to us?

Thanks for all your suggestions



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Old 08-23-00, 12:29 AM
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If component video is a must, then there are only a few receivers available...most tend to be expensive. Some receivers that have component video include, but not limited to, Yamaha RXV1, Onkyo 989, Marantz SR18 (probably the upcoming SR14), Denon AVR5700 (discontinued) or AVR5800 (new this or next month), Denon AVR4800 (US$2000 list), Denon AVR3300 (US$1000 list). Also, some of the upcoming Sony ES receivers will have component video (444ES and another lower model I think). Be advised that most allegedly do not pass some HDTV signals without some degradation.

If S-video is only required, then there are many more receivers that can fit the bill, mostly cheaper than those above. Sony DB840 or DB940, Sony 777ES, Pioneer Elite series, Onkyo 575X.

For a shorter list, we need a budget limit.


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Old 08-23-00, 03:30 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by DavidY:
If component video is a must, then there are only a few receivers available...

If S-video is only required, then there are many more receivers that can fit the bill, mostly cheaper than those above.



I'm confused. Is an S-Video or component video port necessary on your receiver if you plan to use either of them with your DVD player?????

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Old 08-23-00, 01:32 PM
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Hi

Well I would like both( s-video and component) but is the s-video the one that has the "must" . I actually connect all the equipment with rca type connectors.

by the way, ny budget is about 700 dls, adn for my friend, he has a 1200 budget

So what do you think, can you help us and make a suggestion?

thnaks for all your help

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Old 08-23-00, 02:18 PM
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You might want to think about whether you really need component switching, as this will limit your choices and raise the entry price. My receiver includes this feature, but I don't use it. Instead, I route the component out from the DVD directly to the TV. This approach is cheaper as I only need one set of cables. Also on some receivers, like Denon, the receiver's onscreen menus are not available thru the component out; thus, you still need to have a s-video connection from the receiver to the TV.

DavidY, listed some good receiver choices with/with out component switching. Also check out Outlaw Audio (www.outlawaudio.com). Their receiver (S-Video, but not component) is mail order only, but has a 30day money back guarantee.

Something else to think about is upgrading your front speakers. Ideally, front and center speakers should be timbre matched. Something in the Infinity family might be a better match than the Bose you are now using.
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Old 08-24-00, 01:29 AM
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For a budget around US$700, I would suggest either the Marantz SR7000 or Denon AVR3300. The Marantz has a nicer remote and is considered by many to be warm sounding. The Denon has component video switching (insufficient bandwidth to pass HDTV signals) and is probably considered to be fairly neutral sounding (a few have noted it to be a bit bright). Both receivers are very highly regarded by many. Have a listen and pick the one that you like the sound of and it's features.

For a budget of US$1200, there are a few cheaper (say US$1000) and a few a bit more expensive (say US$1400-$1500). In the US$1000 category, the Sony 777ES has the best bass management features, very heavy which usually indicates very good build quality. Has many DSP's and is generally neutral, but is very tweakable. Another well regarded receiver is the Marantz SR8000, which is similar to the SR7000 with some improvements like a great remote. Also, warm sounding.

In the US$1500 range, Denon AVR4800 is THX rated, ton's of power (five channels tested at 148 WPC by Sound and Vision), heavy, has EX (but not discrete). The weakest link is probably it's remote, which is similar or the same as the AVR-3300.

There are others, but these are the heavy hitters. BTW, I have the 777ES.

Good luck and have fun auditioning.


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Old 08-24-00, 12:36 PM
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Component is superior to S-Video. But
at your price point, I would eliminate component swithcing as a requirement and connect the DVD player directly to the TV. Besides the receiver, you'll need about $100 in component cables to route thru your receiver.

BTW: The Outlaw is about $600 and worth a listen.
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Old 08-24-00, 12:39 PM
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I just bought a Pioneer Elite VSX-26tx, and I love it. I think the street price is ~$850. I got it for $450 on an open box special.

It's got all the stuff you want, except component switching, and is THX Ultra Certified to boot.
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Old 08-25-00, 02:52 AM
  #13  
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Hi

So as I can see the suggestions are

Yamaha RXV1
Denon AVR3300
Sony DB940 or 777ES
Onkyo (personally I Do not like Onkyo)
Pioneer Elite VSX-26tx
Marantz SR7000 or SR8000

Is any of the above with on screen menus (I like that, to configure viewing my TV) and an equilizer?

And.....what would be your final suggestion


Thanks again for all your knoweledgeable suggestions


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Old 08-25-00, 03:35 AM
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Vico,

FYI, the Yamaha RXV1 (US$3200 list) is street priced in the mid US$2000 range. The Onkyo 989 is priced in the low US$2000 range (US$2100-$2200 seems about right).

The Onkyo 575X, Sony DB840 or DB940 and the Pioneer 26TX appear to be the front runners in the under US$500 range.

The Sony 777ES is very tweakable. Although I have no experience with this feature, it has an EQ feature where you can make adjustments to tailor the sound to your liking. I think you need a calibrated mic and a sound meter and/or a computer with special software to optimize the sound in a listening room environment. One of the cons about the 777ES is the remote. It just doesn't allow the user enough time to make commands. I am using the remote for setup purposes and the occasional DSP control only. My trusty $20 Cinema 7 remote does the rest.

Sorry, but I am not very familar with the onscreen controls of these receivers.

Dave

P.S. Late addition to my post -- Be advised that there have been reports that some Onkyo 575X receivers still have the infamous hiss problem...make sure that you can get a 30 day, free return policy with Onkyo.



[This message has been edited by DavidY (edited August 26, 2000).]
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Old 08-25-00, 03:48 PM
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There are some great recommendations above. I am a Marantz fan myself.

The SR-7000 is a great value.

I have the SR-8000 and if you want a great remote, it has it.

One receiver I have not seen mentioned (may have missed it), I think is the Outlaw which does 6.1 also. It's in the lower of your two price ranges I believe and has gotten favorable comments in other threads.
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Old 08-25-00, 05:34 PM
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Will your receiver be primarily used for home theatre or do you want quality music as well? If you're a music fan also, I'd add NAD to this list. The T760 is an awesome receiver. It doesn't have component input/outputs, but as mentioned earlier it's probably better to make a direct connection to the tv with that.
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Old 08-26-00, 04:16 PM
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KungFuMidget, as you said the NAD is a great receiver. I almost bought one myself. But in the end I decided I could not live w/o DTS. Granted, there aren't that many DTS titles out worth owning---but if DTS is a consideration then the NAD won't be a good choice.
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Old 08-27-00, 02:28 AM
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Hi

Thanks for all your suggestions, I am still not sure what I want but now I know what I dont.

Thanks
PS
-DTS is a must for me.

All the improvement start when I Kenw Jurassic Park was beeing release with DTS ( am a Big Fan), so far I had change my tv (an Sony CPJ-200 LCD projector to a 61" Sony rear projector), my DVD (a Sony 300 to a 360 DTS) my central chanel (From a bose cube to a infinity cc-1) my rear speakers (from Onkyo to an Infinity QPS-1).

Almost all the new equipment come as suggestions from all of you here in DVDTALK.

Thanks

My last wish (in this time because I know that I still have to change my two Bose front speakers an my onkyo sub but I am almost out of money) is to change my Sony Receiver.....

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Old 08-27-00, 05:46 PM
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Audrey,Vico:

The NAD T760 has DTS decoding. The NAD T770 doesn't.

Right now I'm trying to decide between the T760 or the Marantz SR8000. The T760 has a warmer, more spacious sound than the SR8000 with 2-channel music. But, I've read that the T760 may be a little weaker on the movie surround front. Unfortunately, none of the local dealers(believe or not) have their T760 or SR8000 hooked up in surround for movies in their show rooms! Anyone who's listened to both in surround care to weigh in? Thanks.

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Old 08-27-00, 06:02 PM
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Oops, my bad. The NAD T760 does indeed have DTS. I wish this model had been available when I was in the market last summer.

Red, I had the same problem with dealers only demonstrating certain receivers in 2 channel systems. In the end, I arranged in advance for a dealer to set up several receivers in a HT system so I could narrow down my choices. From this list I found two to bring home to compare. You might give this approach a try.
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Old 08-28-00, 12:56 PM
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Red,

I've never listened to the Marantz SR8000, but I own a T760 and I can tell you that the surround mode is awesome. The T760 also comes with something called EARS mode (Enhanced Ambience Recovery System) which is pretty much a 5.1 surround mode for music. It's a pretty neat feature and it actually sounds a lot better than you'd think it would.

My setup includes:
NAD T760
Pioneer DV-333 (DVD)
Denon DCM-370 HDCD (CD)
Cerwin Vega Re-30's (Front)
Cerwin Vega LS-6C (Center)
Pioneer CS-G303's (Rear)
Klipsch KSW12 (Sub)

Incredible sound for both music and movies.

Note: The subwoofer is not active in stereo mode on the T760, so you need some pretty decent main speakers if you listen to music a lot. There are a few workarounds listed on NAD's website in the FAQ section, so it's really not that big of deal... just a FYI.
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Old 09-02-00, 08:03 PM
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Hi

I want to thank you all of you who help me to choose my new receiver. I really apreciate it

I will buy a Dennon AVR-3300 and my friend choose the Dennon AVR-4800

Thanks again

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Old 09-03-00, 03:11 AM
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1rst-Denon.
2nd-Marantz.
3rd-NAD.
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Old 09-03-00, 05:13 AM
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i was under the impression that s-vhs cables provided a far sharper / detailed picture, however everyone here seems to be of the opinion that component video is better. im confused.

my dvd outputs only 2 sorts of video. s-vhs and coaxial thats composite right ? and how is component being output ? is that via RGB ?

please enlighten me ! thanx

[This message has been edited by peterjon (edited September 03, 2000).]
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Old 09-03-00, 05:32 AM
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quote:
Originally posted by peterjon:
i was under the impression that s-vhs cables provided a far sharper / detailed picture, however everyone here seems to be of the opinion that component video is better. im confused.

my dvd outputs only 2 sorts of video. s-vhs and coaxial thats composite right ? and how is component being output ? is that via RGB ?

please enlighten me ! thanx

[This message has been edited by peterjon (edited September 03, 2000).]




First of all you are confusing S-VHS with S-Video. S-VHS is a type of VCR (higher quality then a regular VCR). S-Video is the type of connection on the back of electronic components such as DVD players, S-VHS VCRs and TVs.

Second of all composite and cables are a type of coaxial cable, which means you can use a composite cable that is 75 Ohms as a digital coax cable between the DVD player and the receiver.

Thirdly their are three types of video connection. In terms of quality going from good to best they are:

1)Composite
2)S-Video
3)Component

The jump in quality from composite to S-Video is pretty significant. As I have not had the opportunity to use component connections I can't make a personal judgement, but most people say that the jump from S-Video to component is not that significant and not worth the extra price of the cables, especially unless you have a high end HT system.

Finally, what type of video connections you can use will depend on what type you have on your electronic components, e.g. DVD player, TV and receiver.


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