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Projection tv?

Old 08-25-02, 10:32 AM
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Projection tv?

Hi,
I've currently got an old GE 29" TV. I've been windowshopping for a bigger, better one. Won't be buying soon, but for the 1k+ they're costing, I want to do my research.
Anyway:
Is there a difference between 'digital' and 'HD' tv?
Also-most of the large screen TV's I've seen are 'projection.' I've read that rear-projection tv's are more susceptible to burn in, especially from video games. Well, I play a lot of videogames, so I certainly don't want any burn in. Are there any good large screen/widescreen TV's that are non-projection; or if not, how sensitive is the burn in problem?
I'm thinking I want a widescreen, since of course we have a lot of dvd's. Then again, 4:3 stuff will be letterboxed on the sides, so maybe that's not a huge issue.
New to this tech,
--Tony
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Old 08-25-02, 02:52 PM
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I don't know much more about this stuff than you do, but beyond a certain size (~36"), your only choice is projection (or a plasma TV, if you have lots of $$$$). A good place to check for detailed discussions re home theater-quality TV's is www.hometheaterspot.com.
Hope that helps some...
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Old 08-25-02, 03:37 PM
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I really don't care for rear projection. What I ended up doing was to buy a Toshiba 34" Widescreen HDTV flatscreen tube ($1800) for regular viewing and picked up an InFocus LS 570 LCD Projector from eBay for $380 for large (10ft diagonal viewing).

The great thing about the LS570 is that it has plenty of inputs for PC, VCR, DVD players and replacement bulbs can be found for as little as $15 a piece (in contrast to the $300-$400 for higher end LCD projectors)
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Old 08-25-02, 07:30 PM
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I also strongly suggest the front projection route. Although I wouldn't play too many marathon sessions of video games on it.

I just purchased a Plus Piano direct. It was a dealer demo and cost about $800 less than the new version. Call them and ask if they have any left. Should run around $1900 for around an 80" picture.

http://www.plushometheater.com

Visit avscience.com for more projector info.

Barry
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Old 08-25-02, 08:38 PM
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To answer your questions specifically:

Is there a difference between 'digital' and 'HD' tv?

Yes. Typically a TV will be listed as digital if it is HD-Ready but does not have a Digital Tuner. What does this mean? Well the TV can definitely output a 480p image (with a Progressive Scan DVD Player DVD's can't look any better), and should support one (or more) of the HD standards: 720p or 1080i.

Are there any good large screen/widescreen TV's that are non-projection; or if not, how sensitive is the burn in problem?

If you have the budget a Plasma screen or DLP (Digital Light Projection) is pretty much burn-in proof, but that's comparatively high $$$ equipment. A Direct View (traditional tube) TV is the most affordable least resistant to burn-in, outside of those expensive technologies. LCD front projection can be affordable, but may not give you the desired video quality, you need to really research the projectors and know what you're getting (support for high resolution video, inputs, bulb life, bulb costs, native 4:3 with 16:9 support or vice versa). Since you say you play a lot of video games burn-in might be an issue for you on a Rear Projection set, as static images (score, life meters, etc.) displayed for extended periods are the cause of burn-in.


I'm thinking I want a widescreen, since of course we have a lot of dvd's. Then again, 4:3 stuff will be letterboxed on the sides, so maybe that's not a huge issue.

I went widescreen, we watch primarily DVDs, occassional TV, and no video games. In my assesment I saw better DVD picture quality on widescreen sets then 4:3 sets (even those that did an anamorphic squeeze. Plus, I felt over the life of the TV (with the increased availability of HDTV) we would watch more 16:9 TV content than 4:3. But this is truly an individual choice, and for many the cost difference makes the decision for them.

Definitely do you research. www.hometheaterspot.com and www.avsforum.com are both great sources for hardware information. Don't limit yourself to one forum as each one has it's own niche of experts that will point out the strengths and weaknesses of the different technologies available.

Last edited by jim_cook87; 08-25-02 at 08:42 PM.
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