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Going to the Tokyo Game Show!!

Old 07-25-02, 02:10 PM
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Going to the Tokyo Game Show!!

I wanted to go last year, but was strapped for cash. This year, new promotion, more money = I'm going to Tokyo
the game show this year is
September 20 & 21 the 21st it's open to the public. I always wanted to go to Japan and this is a good excuse.
there is a Tour Package here:
http://www.visitjtec.com/prepacktours/gameshow/

edit: if anybody has a media/ or game industry pass and wants to help me get in both days email me

Last edited by squidget; 07-25-02 at 02:13 PM.
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Old 07-25-02, 03:00 PM
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You lucky son of a ...
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Old 07-25-02, 05:55 PM
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you can go too, the more the merrier

there's tons of internet cafe things in Japan right?
I'll make sure to post the happenings, so that way it feels like you're right there. (w/o leaving the comforts of your chair)
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Old 07-26-02, 03:43 AM
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It is really not as expensive as I thought.

Of course since I do not speak Japanese i guess it might make the trip a bit more challenging.

I might have to think about this next year
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Old 07-26-02, 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by gcribbs

Of course since I do not speak Japanese i guess it might make the trip a bit more challenging.
Nah, almost everyone under 40 can speak english over there and are more than happy to practice on you if you need directions (which you will with their crazy building numbering system). There's also a lot of english signs and the subway system is pretty easy to navigate. Just don't go during rush hour unless you want to be wedged into a subway car like a sardine. They've actually got guys with broomsticks whose job is to help pack everyone into the subway car so the doors can close! It's a sight not to be missed.
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Old 07-26-02, 04:51 PM
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Can anyone point me towards a website that has lots of pictures of hot videogame booth chicks in nutty outfits? There's just something extra cool about a hot chick in a Parappa the Rappa suit.

BTW, squidget, make sure you bring your digital camera and post lots of pictures!

Last edited by rabbit77; 07-26-02 at 04:58 PM.
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Old 07-29-02, 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by Tamrok


Nah, almost everyone under 40 can speak english over there and are more than happy to practice on you if you need directions (which you will with their crazy building numbering system).
Actually, that is not a very accurate statement. I was over there a month ago for 3 weeks, and the percentage of people that understand English are much lower than I thought. And I am talking about Tokyo too; if it's one of the outlying towns outside Tokyo, the percentage drops to below 15%. Certainly, at most establishments like hotels, restaurants, and major department stores communications is not a problem. But it could be difficult to talk to someone just off the street. Also, their numbering system is quiet logical, just different from how we do it here.

The subway system there is very nice. Once you figure out how to switch lines and read the directions, you can pretty much go anywhere in Tokyo by subways.

Anyway, people over there are always quiet polite. If you could manage to use simple Japanese vocabularies with some English thrown in, you should be able to get by just fine. The other thing to get used to over there is that people will constantly bow at you.

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Old 07-29-02, 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by ~~ PAL ~~


Actually, that is not a very accurate statement. I was over there a month ago for 3 weeks, and the percentage of people that understand English are much lower than I thought. And I am talking about Tokyo too; if it's one of the outlying towns outside Tokyo, the percentage drops to below 15%. Certainly, at most establishments like hotels, restaurants, and major department stores communications is not a problem. But it could be difficult to talk to someone just off the street. Also, their numbering system is quiet logical, just different from how we do it here.

Hmmm... I guess we had two very different experiences over there. I personally had no trouble finding people who spoke english. English is a mandatory subject in school over there. Some Japanese are very self-conscious about their english skills and are reluctant to use it with a native english speaker. Perhaps that is where you got that impression. Bottom line, I didn't have any problem getting around without being able to speak a lick of Japanese.

As for the numbering system, since the buildings are not numbered sequentially but instead by the order in which each was built, I don't think it's unreasonable to say that it can be a bit confusing to find a particular building. Coming from other parts of the world, most people when looking for building 6 on a particular street would logically expect it to be located between building 5 and 7. As you know, that would not be the case in Japan. Building 6 would be the sixth building built in that Chome (area) and might be nowhere near building 5 or 7. Thus, you often must ask the local policeman for directions to a particular building within a given area (or wander around until you finally stumble upon it).
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Old 07-29-02, 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by Tamrok

Hmmm... I guess we had two very different experiences over there. I personally had no trouble finding people who spoke english. English is a mandatory subject in school over there. Some Japanese are very self-conscious about their english skills and are reluctant to use it with a native english speaker. Perhaps that is where you got that impression. Bottom line, I didn't have any problem getting around without being able to speak a lick of Japanese.

As for the numbering system, since the buildings are not numbered sequentially but instead by the order in which each was built, I don't think it's unreasonable to say that it can be a bit confusing to find a particular building. Coming from other parts of the world, most people when looking for building 6 on a particular street would logically expect it to be located between building 5 and 7. As you know, that would not be the case in Japan. Building 6 would be the sixth building built in that Chome (area) and might be nowhere near building 5 or 7. Thus, you often must ask the local policeman for directions to a particular building within a given area (or wander around until you finally stumble upon it).
Perhaps our experiences were a little different. I stayed at a small town called Odawara (80 miles from Tokyo) for 2 weeks, and it was not possible to get by there with only English. Even young people only have a very limited knowledge with English. Yes, it is mandatory to learn English for 6 years in Japan, but that only covers basic written English and some spoken English. People over there usually cannot speak proper English until they invest more time into it. (did you notice how popular English [language] schools are over there?) All the Japanese colleagues over there that speaks some English admitted that the 6 years of English at Jr. and high school was not adequate for conversation, and they did have to put additional time and effort to learn the language.

The experience at Tokyo was actually 2nd hand for me. I can read Kanji, so I didn't have problems getting around. But my co-worker, who does not speak a lick of Japanese, constantly has to ask for directions; especially when he's not with me. The experience that he relayed was that he still had a hard time communicating with people for directions, and the majority of people still provided him directions in Japanese. People were trying to be helpful, but Japanese directions didn't help him that much. But most of the time people can understand what he was asking after a few tries; I guess the toughest part was for Japanese to speak English (without breaking into Japanglish ), even when they understood your question.

As far as their building numbers, I don't like them either. I was just trying to point out that it was logical.

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Old 07-29-02, 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by ~~ PAL ~~


Perhaps our experiences were a little different. I stayed at a small town called Odawara (80 miles from Tokyo) for 2 weeks, and it was not possible to get by there with only English. Even young people only have a very limited knowledge with English. Yes, it is mandatory to learn English for 6 years in Japan, but that only covers basic written English and some spoken English. People over there usually cannot speak proper English until they invest more time into it. (did you notice how popular English [language] schools are over there?) All the Japanese colleagues over there that speaks some English admitted that the 6 years of English at Jr. and high school was not adequate for conversation, and they did have to put additional time and effort to learn the language.

The experience at Tokyo was actually 2nd hand for me. I can read Kanji, so I didn't have problems getting around. But my co-worker, who does not speak a lick of Japanese, constantly has to ask for directions; especially when he's not with me. The experience that he relayed was that he still had a hard time communicating with people for directions, and the majority of people still provided him directions in Japanese. People were trying to be helpful, but Japanese directions didn't help him that much. But most of the time people can understand what he was asking after a few tries; I guess the toughest part was for Japanese to speak English (without breaking into Japanglish ), even when they understood your question.

As far as their building numbers, I don't like them either. I was just trying to point out that it was logical.

PAL
Yeah, I spent most of my time in Tokyo but I could see where it might be more difficult in the rural areas. For the most part, I had no problem getting around and finding things in Tokyo. As you mentioned, the people are all very nice and try their best to help you. I definitely found that the younger the person, the more likely that they could speak passable english. If I needed help, I usually tried to ask someone in their twenties which seemed to work pretty well. Overall, I really enjoyed my time there and hope to go back soon.
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Old 07-30-02, 03:21 AM
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I can help out, if I have time.I might not be going to the show but if any dvdtalks member's need help,I might be able to help out
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