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Recommend a computer to edit digital video?

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Recommend a computer to edit digital video?

Old 02-02-03, 03:54 PM
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Recommend a computer to edit digital video?

I have to start over again. My 950 Anthlon just died. Anyway, I want to build a computer to create dvds from my digital camcorder. I don't know how big of a HD I need but I have an extra 40GB 7200 already. So far I am leaning towards:

Epox Motherboard for AMD, Socket A Processors, Model EP-8K9A2+

2100+/266 FSB Thorougbred Processor CPU 2100+/ 1.73GHz

256 Samsung Original DDR333 PC-2700 256MB CAS2.5 - OEM

Thermaltake VOLCANO 7+.

I am trying to stay under $300 plus a videocard. I can't figure out what card I will need but I was hoping to not spend more than I need to.

Is this a pretty decent system? And what videocard would work well here that is reasonably priced?
Old 02-03-03, 05:45 PM
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Ummm... I would totally recommend a faster processor of course. It has to be 2.0 GHz or faster which will aid the encoding. I also think that your HD is pretty decent. If you want to you can go bigger but make sure you stay at 7200 rpm and just try not to fill it up to much because you need at least 5GB free to encode and it will go kinda slow. Another thing I know this website where you can get really good cases for really cheap prices at www.colorcases.com and also, AMD is a lot cheaper than a Pentium 4 but if you can try to get a P4 because it has better video integraty. I have a question for ya... How do you know what 2100+ means? I don't get all of that AMD buisness with it's Athlon processors.
Old 02-03-03, 11:05 PM
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OK. maybe I should have said best computer setup for video under $400. I ended up with the setup I mentioned plus I picked up a Radeon 8500 64DDR. As for AMD and their numbering scheme. The only way I know what it means is that I just spent last weekend getting familiar with all the lingo since it has been 3 years since I have looking into this stuff.
Old 02-04-03, 08:38 AM
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You need lots of drive space for video editing, preferably on a separate spindle. DV quality is ~200MB/minutes, so one 60 minute tape requires 12GB. When making recommendations, I double that number because you're likely to have source files (12GB) and edited files (12GB more). So, to edit one hour of video you're looking at 24GB. Not to mention any scratch files, of course...

I'd get at least a 100GB drive just for video needs.
Old 02-04-03, 09:47 AM
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I have 2 40GB hard drives in my computer. One for programs and one for data. When I edited my 5 minute short I used up almost 30GB. This was due to raw footage and scratch files all at DV quality. If I was editing a feature length video (90 minutes) I would probably need about 500GB just to be safe. I use the ratio of 20:1 for raw footage to finished product even though I usually get closer to 12:1 because it takes into account the extra space needed for workspace. Hopefully soon I'll be setting up a RAID so I can work on longer videos. If you don't mind transferring video back and forth between your HD and DV tape you could get by with less space, but it's such a hassle to me.
Old 02-04-03, 12:25 PM
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Wow that is a lot of space. I guess I will sell the extra 40GB drive I had new and get a larger one. I mainly want to start by transferring some of my DV tapes to dvd. Eventually, I would like to edit and create compliations of video on one disc. Since I am trying to figure out how to pay for the stuff I just ordered I will keep my eyes open for a deal on a 120GB drive.
Old 02-04-03, 10:34 PM
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I forgot to mention offline editing because I'm not very familiar with it.

Here's what I think I know (someone correct me if I'm wrong):

Basically offline editing is capturing low-res footage from your tape to your hard drive. It takes up about 25MB per minute. You edit your footage and create an edit decision list. Then your editing program tells you which tapes to put in and it captures only the footage you need to make the final video. Don't ask me specifics because that's all I know about offline editing (if that's even what it is called).

I like working at full resolution so I can jump back and forth between Premiere and After Effects and not have to worry what my video will look like. Large hard drives dedicated to video are good.

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