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L2 Cache fix???

Old 06-18-02, 09:00 PM
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L2 Cache fix???

hey guys, how in the world can you screw around with level 2 cache??? currently i only have like 256kb in there while the level 1 has about 20kb. this was from a test at PCPITSTOP.com..
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Old 06-18-02, 09:01 PM
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You can't with modern CPUs. It's built into the chip.
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Old 06-18-02, 09:21 PM
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DOH!
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Old 06-18-02, 09:53 PM
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I though problem was the L1 cache not the L2 cache. I just remembered you said the pc still even froze up in the BIOS. That's a sign of a serious problem.

I just have a feeling that your problem is heat related.

IMHO, have a PC tech look at it, if you want to pay for that.

I'm wondering if some of your compoents like the CPU or mobo is fried.
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Old 06-18-02, 10:29 PM
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hmmm, i think im just going to fork over some $$ to grab a new MB. now that this has come into mind, which one is better? Asus or Abit? either one must have a socket 478....
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Old 06-18-02, 10:34 PM
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Asus is better IMO.
How many watts does your power supply have? 300? 350? Those should be enough
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Old 06-18-02, 11:12 PM
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I read through your other thread, but I figure I might as well respond to all the points here.

First, your problem likely isn't related to the CPU overheating. The P4's have integrated thermal management so when the core gets too hot, the CPU will actually slow down until it cools off. If you hunt around at tomshardware.com, you can probably find the video of a test they did where they pulled the heatsink off of a P4 that was running Quake. They had Quake running a demo in the background and when the CPU came off, the game slowed to a crawl, but did not stop. When they put the heatsink back on, after a little while, the frame rates picked right back up. Apparently, the stability of the system was not affected by the test.

A few things you might want to try before tossing your motherobard:

- reset your BIOS to factory or default settings.

- re-flash your BIOS

- test your system memory by using 1 stick at a time (2 if you're using RDRAM)

- if all the sticks of memory seem to work okay individually, we can go from there

Those are all fairly simple things to try and if they all fail to solve your stability problems then a motherboard swap may be the next best thing to try.
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Old 06-18-02, 11:42 PM
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is re-flashing the bios, just resetting the cmos?? you think it can be ram?? my MB has given my some bad times since the beginning.
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Old 06-19-02, 02:26 AM
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Not really, the BIOS is program code that resides in ROM (eeprom in modern computers). Among other things, it initializes the hardware devices in your system at power-on and configures them according to settings stored in CMOS. Most of these settings are configured automagically, others are controlled manually by the user through the setup menus. When you "clear CMOS," you're erasing all the stored settings so that the BIOS is forced to re-configure all those settings, defaulting to factory pre-sets for the settings that are user controlled.

It achieves a similar effect to choosing "reset BIOS to factory/default settings" from the BIOS setup menu, but it does so in a significantly different way. I have seen situations where "resetting the BIOS" didn't help, but "clearing the CMOS" did.

Re-flashing the BIOS is a real long shot to fix your problem because systems where the BIOS is corrupted usually won't even POST. However, it's quite easy to do so I often suggest it, though now that I think about it, with your system locking up while in the BIOS setup menus, it might be a bit risky.

Playing musical slots with the memory is definitely worth trying. A bad stick of memory will cause random problems like what you're experiencing, though it's rare to see memory "go bad" unless you're operating it out of spec. I've had problems where each stick worked fine indvidually, but would cause problems when used in certain combinations. This again, isn't something that usually crops up, though you mention now that you've always had problems with this system.
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Old 06-19-02, 11:12 AM
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hmm, thnx for that bit of advice, however belboz, would it be easy for you to tell me how to "flash the bios," if you were to write it up on here? i have nothing else to loose, if this MB goes then its onto a new one.
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Old 06-19-02, 07:27 PM
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If you want to try flashing your BIOS, you'll have to go to your board manufacturer's web site and get the appropriate file(s). There's two components that are needed, a BIOS flash utility and the BIOS image itself. Typically, these are packaged together in one zip file, but sometimes they make you download them separately. The BIOS image files are particular to each model of motherboard, so be sure to get the one that's meant for your model.

The flash utility is almost always designed to run from DOS, so you may need to make a boot disk. Basically, you boot to the floppy drive with the flash utility on it and then execute the utility from the command line. After it's done, you just reboot.

If the power goes out while the utility is in the midst of flashing your eeprom or if the utility fails for some reason, there's a good chance it'll hose your BIOS such that your board won't even POST. In such cases, if the eeprom on your board is socketed, you'll have to swap it out with one that's got a working program on it. Unless you happen to have an external eeprom programmer or another unit of that same model motherboard handy, you'll pretty much have to contact the motherboard's manufacturer to get a replacement chip.
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