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-   -   Little Leaguer gets injured sliding into 2nd base. Mom sues the coach. (https://forum.dvdtalk.com/sports-talk/501292-little-leaguer-gets-injured-sliding-into-2nd-base-mom-sues-coach.html)

chrisih8u 05-22-07 09:11 AM

Little Leaguer gets injured sliding into 2nd base. Mom sues the coach.
 
Mom sues baseball coach for bad coaching
NEW SPRINGVILLE, N.Y., May 20 (UPI) -- A New York mother is suing her son's baseball coach for not teaching him to properly slide into a base.

The lawsuit, filed May 4, stems from an episode three years ago when the woman's son, Martin, attempted to slide onto a base and suffered "serious bodily injury" that resulted in "permanent scarring and disability," according to the suit she filed in Staten Island Supreme Court.

The New York Post reported the woman as saying her son was encouraged by his coach to run from first base to second, where the injury allegedly occurred. The lawsuit did not specify the dollar amount the coach is being sued for.

News of the lawsuit shocked the local Little League community, with some parents calling the action frivolous and unnecessary, the Post reported.

http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Quirks/...coaching/1926/


-ohbfrank- Are there any coaches here? I can't imagine why anyone would volunteer. Doesnt seem worth it between dealing with parents bitching and the threat of a lawsuit.

And permanent scarring and disability? I wish they explained that a little better.

wildcatlh 05-22-07 09:18 AM

Here's the original article from the New York Post


May 20, 2007 -- She won't let it slide.

A Staten Island mom is blaming her son's injury during a Little League game on a bum education in base-running.

In a new twist on an old rite of passage, Jean Gonzalez is suing a beloved veteran coach for not teaching her son Martin how to slide properly, according to a lawsuit filed on May 4.

The litigation stems from an ill-fated play exactly three years earlier, when Martin, then 12, whacked his first hit of the season and was told to go for second by his first-base coach.

When he slid into second base, he suffered "serious bodily injury" that required multiple surgeries and caused "permanent scarring and disability," according to the suit filed in Staten Island Supreme Court. The suit did not specify the dollar amount of damages.

Martin's coach, Leigh Bernstein, the New Springville Little League, and its international umbrella organization, Little League Baseball and Softball Inc., are all named as defendants in the suit, which charges them with never teaching him "skills needed to avoid and/or minimize the risks of injury," specifically how to run bases and slide.

News of the suit shocked the league, with some parents calling it frivolous and saying injuries are part of the game.

"I think it's kind of funny," Tricia Gregoretti said last week at New Springville's ball field while watching her 6-year-old son play. "It just doesn't make sense."

New Springville league President Luis Mojica expressed dismay that a lawsuit would target a program that introduces youngsters to the national pastime.

"All we do is provide a place for kids to play," said Mojica. "We're a community service."

He added that New Springville meets Little League safety standards, including the required foam bases that lessen the risk of injuries to players.

Bernstein was also surprised by the suit.

"I've been coaching for over 20 years, and have instructed players in the various skills required to play baseball, including sliding," he said. "Unfortunately, injuries happen. That's part of the game."

Despite the exhaustive training, injuries do occur, said Little League Baseball spokesman Chris Downs.

"You can instruct players thoroughly on techniques. That does not necessarily mean that the proper technique will be used in a game," he said.

Downs stressed the low number of Little League injuries. An average of 10,000 games are played each night and less than 1 percent of injuries that occur require medical treatment at a hospital, Downs said.
http://www.nypost.com/seven/05202007...ike_scholl.htm

dx23 05-22-07 09:37 AM

I coach little league basketball and for lawsuits like this, we have insurance. We have like four different insurance policies to cover all our asses from frivolous lawsuits like these. Still, for our insurance to cover us completely, all the coaches must be certified by FIBA Puerto Rico.

Jericho 05-22-07 11:00 AM

I wonder if she got the idea from watching Friday Night Lights...

pinata242 05-22-07 11:01 AM

I remember sliding into 2nd base around the age of 12 too. Good times.

Deftones 05-22-07 11:02 AM

Ridiculous. Absolutely ridiculous.

TheNightFlier 05-22-07 11:10 AM

Wow. -ohbfrank-

Linn1 05-22-07 11:34 AM

Talk about a mother that just ruined a kids life. I can see the teasing starting now and never letting up until college.

deadlax 05-22-07 11:45 AM

I'd like to know how long this kid has played baseball. Every kid knows how to slide by 12. I remember many a day of sliding (and baserunning drills). Kid was probably the last one off the bench, didn't pay attention, etc. It said he got his first hit of the season 3 years to the day the suit was filed, and it sounds like the suit was filed on May 4. That's almost the end of the season, since most little league seasons start sometime in March.

DVD Josh 05-22-07 11:49 AM

I don't necessarily disagree with this lawsuit. It's not frivolous. If you are going to tell a kid to slide, instruct him to do it the right way. However, if they did, and he did, and this was just a freak injury, then it's frivolous, but it doesn't sound that way.

starman9000 05-22-07 11:56 AM


Originally Posted by Linn1
Talk about a mother that just ruined a kids life. I can see the teasing starting now and never letting up until college.


Plus, he wont be able to run away from the bullies.

pinata242 05-22-07 11:56 AM


Originally Posted by DVD Josh
If you are going to tell a kid to slide, instruct him to do it the right way. However, if they did, and he did, and this was just a freak injury, then it's frivolous, but it doesn't sound that way.

What if they did instruct him to do it properly but he didn't execute it properly?

How do you prove now, 3 years later, how a non-professional kid slid into 2nd base? Good thing I'm not on the jury because the plaintiff is going to have a hard time convincing me that anyone is to blame but bad luck.

Red Dog 05-22-07 12:07 PM


Originally Posted by pinata242
How do you prove now, 3 years later, how a non-professional kid slid into 2nd base? Good thing I'm not on the jury because the plaintiff is going to have a hard time convincing me that anyone is to blame but bad luck.


Believe me - the plaintiff isn't looking to get this in front of a jury.

LurkerDan 05-22-07 12:49 PM


Originally Posted by DVD Josh
I don't necessarily disagree with this lawsuit. It's not frivolous. If you are going to tell a kid to slide, instruct him to do it the right way. However, if they did, and he did, and this was just a freak injury, then it's frivolous, but it doesn't sound that way.

I'm sure his parents signed a waiver. You don't think sliding into second base, and any resultant injury, was covered by the waiver? Do you think the failure to teach the kid the right way to slide into the base (even if they did fail to teach) was anything but simple negligence (which presumably they waived any claims for)? Surely you don't think it rose to the level of gross negligence!

I will withhold final judgment until I hear all the facts, but based upon common sense and what we know so far, this seems rather frivolous.

devilshalo 05-22-07 02:17 PM

I don't know how to slide feet first. :(

MrX 05-22-07 03:08 PM


Originally Posted by Jericho
I wonder if she got the idea from watching Friday Night Lights...

I thought the same thing:lol:

DVD Josh 05-22-07 03:10 PM


Originally Posted by pinata242
What if they did instruct him to do it properly but he didn't execute it properly?

You mean exactly the situation I wrote in my post? See above.

pinata242 05-22-07 03:26 PM


Originally Posted by DVD Josh
You mean exactly the situation I wrote in my post? See above.

Not exactly, but the other side. You assumed he was instructed properly AND executed properly. I'm suggesting what if he was instructed properly BUT did not execute properly.

Maybe I'm not reading your "and he did" right. I'm reading it as "he the kid", not "he the coach".

DVD Josh 05-22-07 03:29 PM


Originally Posted by pinata242
Not exactly, but the other side. You assumed he was instructed properly AND executed properly. I'm suggesting what if he was instructed properly BUT did not execute properly.

Maybe I'm not reading your "and he did" right. I'm reading it as "he the kid", not "he the coach".

No, you are correct, I did not say that. Sorry. My opinion wouldn't change, it would still be frivolous. Well, I might change my mind if I found out that the coaches had actually knowledge he sucked at sliding.

I know that when I played LL, we had a no sliding rule for this very reason.

matta 05-22-07 04:18 PM


Originally Posted by devilshalo
I don't know how to slide feet first. :(

Run as fast as you can at something, then about 5 feet away, throw all your weight backwards, push out your arms and tuck one leg. When you hit the bag, plant your lead foot and pop up, using your tucked foot to prevent overshooting the bag (though most kids don't do the pop-up step, they just lay there and call for time -- also, you can't do the pop-up at home or if you can I've never been able to figure it out).

If it's a double-play situation and you're going into second, aim wide of the bag and at the crotch of the guy covering the base.

IMRICKJAMES 05-22-07 05:17 PM

Welcome to 21st century America

Nothing is your fault. If something happens sue someone else.

Coffee too hot? Sue

Slip and fall? Sue

Have an unathletic son that should just be playing baseball on XBox? Sue

El Scorcho 05-22-07 05:47 PM


Originally Posted by matta
also, you can't do the pop-up at home or if you can I've never been able to figure it out).

You can do the pop-up side anywhere at any time, base or not. It's simple after you practice a few times.

of course, I play softball now which means I don't slide anymore.

MovieMaster11 05-22-07 05:53 PM

my little league coach would get mad when I slid into 1st. What can I say I was a very cocky 8 year old.

devilshalo 05-22-07 06:16 PM


Originally Posted by matta
Run as fast as you can at something, then about 5 feet away, throw all your weight backwards, push out your arms and tuck one leg. When you hit the bag, plant your lead foot and pop up, using your tucked foot to prevent overshooting the bag (though most kids don't do the pop-up step, they just lay there and call for time -- also, you can't do the pop-up at home or if you can I've never been able to figure it out).

If it's a double-play situation and you're going into second, aim wide of the bag and at the crotch of the guy covering the base.

Well, I slide head first. 20+ years of playing volleyball and knowing how to hit the floor for a ball taught me the proper way to go head first. I can pop up just as quick and be on my feet running if need be. I don't pull that Willie Mays Hays crap and end up short of the bag.

TheNightFlier 05-22-07 06:17 PM


Originally Posted by MovieMaster11
my little league coach would get mad when I slid into 1st. What can I say I was a very cocky 8 year old.

:lol:

I did that as well, think I was 10. Coach didn't appreciate it.

I remember doing sliding drills every year after tee ball, every practice. Every coach I had made sure we knew how to slide properly. It sounds like this kid just muffed it and hurt himself.


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