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"No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

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"No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Old 12-21-18, 05:07 PM
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"No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

The waiter asked me if I wanted fresh ground pepper on my salad. I said, "Please." After enough pepper was dispensed I said, "Thank you."
The waiter said, "No problem." Is this the same as "You're welcome?"
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Old 12-21-18, 05:11 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

I had a bad habit of doing this. A friend of mine posted on Facebook about this, saying that he thought we should be saying "you're welcome" because "no problem" makes it sound dismissive of the thanks you received - like it wasn't a big deal so no thanks are needed. Which I decided I 100% agree with. I've made a conscious effort to answer with "you're welcome" and it's felt really good. It also drives home how many people around me say "no problem".
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Old 12-21-18, 05:18 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

I avoid saying "no problem" for fear of verbal retaliation like "Who said we had one?" or "You want a problem?"
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Old 12-21-18, 05:42 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by parrotheads4 View Post
The waiter asked me if I wanted fresh ground pepper on my salad. I said, "Please." After enough pepper was dispensed I said, "Thank you."
The waiter said, "No problem." Is this the same as "You're welcome?"
Depends on the person so you'll never know.
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Old 12-21-18, 05:52 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Shit, I just realized I do this. Now that I think about it more, it does come off as dismissive instead of casual.

Thank you.
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Old 12-21-18, 05:55 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Thank you. I think I once mentioned it in the Pet Peeve thread. I HATE when waiters say "No Problem" when I thank them for doing their job.

I didn't think it was going to be a problem to refill my water glass, but glad to hear you agree.
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Old 12-21-18, 05:57 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by parrotheads4 View Post
The waiter asked me if I wanted fresh ground pepper on my salad. I said, "Please." After enough pepper was dispensed I said, "Thank you."
The waiter said, "No problem." Is this the same as "You're welcome?"
Also to a response of "No worries" ?




.

I guess it could work if you were at Outback.
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Old 12-21-18, 06:31 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by parrotheads4 View Post
The waiter asked me if I wanted fresh ground pepper on my salad. I said, "Please." After enough pepper was dispensed I said, "Thank you."
The waiter said, "No problem." Is this the same as "You're welcome?"
I thin it is the customary and idiomatic response in some languages. In Portuguese, it is "de nada," literally for nothing. In English, it might be better translated as "it was nothing," but yes it minimizes what you thanked the person for.
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Old 12-21-18, 06:34 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

I say “No problem” almost all the time. I understand the argument for not saying it but, frankly, I think it’s stupid so I’m in no hurry to change my current habit.
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Old 12-21-18, 06:35 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by OldDude View Post
I thin it is the customary and idiomatic response in some languages. In Portuguese, it is "de nada," literally for nothing. In English, it might be better translated as "it was nothing," but yes it minimizes what you thanked the person for.
You thin?
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Old 12-21-18, 06:53 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by Decker View Post
Thank you. I think I once mentioned it in the Pet Peeve thread. I HATE when waiters say "No Problem" when I thank them for doing their job.

I didn't think it was going to be a problem to refill my water glass, but glad to hear you agree.
No problem.


Seriously though, somewhere along the way I picked up “No worries”. I understand thinking either one is “dismissive”. However, I would caution you to realize it is a cultural difference rather than think somebody is being dismissive.

What about “my pleasure”? I find it very hard to believe that the underage girl at the Chick Filet counter really derives personal gratification from giving me extra packs of Polynesian sauce.
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Old 12-21-18, 07:30 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by Abob Teff View Post
No problem.


Seriously though, somewhere along the way I picked up “No worries”. I understand thinking either one is “dismissive”. However, I would caution you to realize it is a cultural difference rather than think somebody is being dismissive.

What about “my pleasure”? I find it very hard to believe that the underage girl at the Chick Filet counter really derives personal gratification from giving me extra packs of Polynesian sauce.
Chick-fil-A has some of the best customer service I have ever seen. I just read this at Forbes today, probably off topic so I spoilerized:

Spoiler:

Chick-fil-A Is Now McDonald's Biggest Threat


Happy employees equal happy customers. Being closed on Sundays is a perk for employees who can carry on with their personal lives without the possibility of getting called in or scheduled. Many Chick-fil-A operators also pay well above the minimum wage, including a California operator who pays $17 an hour. At the corporate level, Chick-fil-A was just named one of the best large companies for women based on compensation and culture.

Efficiency and accuracy. According to QSR Magazine’s annual drive-thru study, Chick-fil-A’s drive-thru time is the 11th-fastest in the segment. Its accuracy is more of an asset, with a score of 93.4%. To ensure speed and accuracy standards are met, Chick-fil-A continuously tests designs and processes within a full-scale drive-thru mock-up (indoors) at its Atlanta headquarters.
Employees also walk the drive-thru line with tablets to expedite orders. According to Jared Solid, who leads the company’s drive-thru innovation, this “is a great way for us to get really high volumes of cars through the drive-thru extremely efficiently. It’s also a way for us to give customers personalized service in a place they may not expect it.”

Speaking of customer service ... In a time of haste and automation, Chick-fil-A’s signature customer service is a hot commodity. In QSR’s drive-thru study, the chain was first for employees saying “please,” “thank you” and smiling. The company consistently outperforms all other chains across the industry in customer satisfaction surveys, including the most recent American Customer Satisfaction Index. In addition to ingraining pleasantries in its employees, the company is also focused on personalized communication through its newly revamped email program.
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Old 12-21-18, 07:41 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by Sonic View Post
I avoid saying "no problem" for fear of verbal retaliation like "Who said we had one?" or "You want a problem?"
I'd recommend that you stop hanging around street toughs.
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Old 12-21-18, 07:41 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by OldDude View Post
I thin it is the customary and idiomatic response in some languages. In Portuguese, it is "de nada," literally for nothing. In English, it might be better translated as "it was nothing," but yes it minimizes what you thanked the person for.
Same with French: "De rien," for "it's nothing."

At some point I started saying "no problem" because "you're welcome" seemed too formal or something. "No worries" has always seemed too cutesy to me.
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Old 12-21-18, 08:06 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by cultshock View Post
I'd recommend that you stop hanging around street toughs.
You mean move out of my state. We're known for being rude.
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Old 12-21-18, 08:55 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

My theory is that many people are hesitant to say "You're welcome" because it's too formal-sounding for most situations, whereas one can toss out a "No problem" or "Sure thing" without seeming pedantic.
I use "You're welcome" with my 5-year-old niece because I'm trying to help teach her good manners, but I hardly ever use it otherwise.
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Old 12-21-18, 08:59 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

I always say "no problem, pal" (or buddy, boss, chief) whenever someone thanks me for anything. It lets them know who's really boss.

Also, I do go with "no worries" with people who aren't soon going to get a knee to the groin, but I think that's just a fad.
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Old 12-21-18, 09:30 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Have a good one.
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Old 12-21-18, 09:32 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

I say "No Problem" because "You're Welcome" just sounds weird to me (or I just naturally say it in a snide manner). It does seem to be generational, though I did say You're Welcome when I was a kid.
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Old 12-21-18, 10:37 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by Kurt D View Post
I always say "no problem, pal" (or buddy, boss, chief) whenever someone thanks me for anything. It lets them know who's really boss.
Ahh a New Yorker I see
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Old 12-21-18, 11:00 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

I make a conscious effort not to say "no problem." Usually "you're welcome." Sometimes with patients, I'll say it was "my pleasure" or some other phrase meaning I was glad to be able to help them.
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Old 12-21-18, 11:14 PM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

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Old 12-22-18, 05:21 AM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

This guy at work always says "no problem" or "sure" and sounds like a dick, but that could be because he is one
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Old 12-22-18, 07:38 AM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum View Post
Have a good one.
In all my years of living, I have never understood what that means when people say that. I want to say, have a good what?
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Old 12-22-18, 07:44 AM
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Re: "No Problem" vs "You're welcome" are they the same?

afternoon/day/evening/night/cigarette/beer/pasta dish
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