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Album by Album: Pink Floyd

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Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Old 10-03-10, 08:44 PM
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Album by Album: Pink Floyd

So after seeing Roger Waters: The Wall Live I'm getting back into Pink Floyd music. I've only listened to the hit albums and none of their early works. This should be a fun thread as i start my journey to listen to all of Pink Floyds work and discover a different side to the band.

One question ; Are we including the live albums?
Old 10-03-10, 09:03 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

The Piper at the Gates of Dawn



Track Listing:
Side One
1. "Astronomy Dominé"
2. "Lucifer Sam"
3. "Matilda Mother"
4. "Flaming"
5. "Pow R. Toc H."
6. "Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk"
Side two

1. "Interstellar Overdrive"
2. "The Gnome"
3. "Chapter 24"
4. "Scarecrow"
5. "Bike"

Pink Floyd

* Syd Barrett - vocals, guitar
* Roger Waters – bass guitar, vocals
* Richard Wright – farfisa and hammond organs, piano, vocals
* Nick Mason – drums, percussion

Production

* Peter Bown – engineer
* Jon Crossland – repackage design (1994 CD edition)
* James Guthrie – remastering (2007 deluxe edition)
* Peter Jenner – intro vocalisations on "Astronomy Domine"
* Vic Singh – cover photography
* Doug Sax – remastering (1994 CD edition)
* Norman Smith – production
* Storm Thorgerson – repackage design (1994 CD edition)


Spoiler:
Background

In January 1967, prior to recording The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the band had produced at Sound Techniques Studio in London a single titled "Arnold Layne", which was later released in March, and reached number 20 in the British charts. Also in January, the band had recorded a 16-minute version of "Interstellar Overdrive" and an improvised jam called "Nick's Boogie" for Peter Whitehead's documentary film Tonite Lets All Make Love in London.. (The latter track was released in 1991, on the CD reissue of the film's soundtrack). The band's live show consisted mainly of instrumental numbers and blues covers. However, it had started to introduce songs that were written primarily by guitarist and lead vocalist Syd Barrett.

Recording history


Recording of the album began on 21 February 1967 in studio three of EMI Studios, at the same time that The Beatles were recording Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The album was produced by Norman Smith, an EMI staff member who had previously engineered all of the Beatles' recordings up to 1965's Rubber Soul. Smith would go on to produce Pink Floyd's follow up album, A Saucerful of Secrets. "Interstellar Overdrive" and "Matilda Mother" were two of the first tracks recorded, as the latter was viewed as a potential single. An early, unoverdubbed, shortened mix of the album's "Interstellar Overdrive" was used for a French EP release that July. In April, the band recorded both "Percy the Rat Catcher" (this would later be called "Lucifer Sam"), and a currently unreleased track called "She Was a Millionaire." At some point during the album's creation, Nick Mason recalled that the group was ushered into Studio Two, where the Beatles were recording "Lovely Rita". Several conflicting views surround how efficiently the recording of the album actually went. In his book Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd, Nick Mason recalled that the sessions went smoothly and that the whole process was extremely efficient. Norman Smith, however, condemned both the album's recording and the band members' musical abilities. Smith later stated that the sessions were "sheer hell." Both "The Gnome" and "The Scarecrow" were recorded in one take. Indeed a large proportion of the album is credited solely to Barrett, with tracks such as "Bike" having been written in late 1966 before the album was even started. "Bike" was originally titled "The Bike Song," and it was recorded on 21 May 1967. The last recording session took place on 5 July 1967, with the track "Pow R. Toc H." being one of the last songs added to the album.
[edit] Album cover and title

Vic Singh photographed and designed the album cover. The back cover features a silhouette drawing of the band done by Barrett himself.

The album's title comes from the title of Chapter Seven, "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn", of Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows, where Rat and Mole, while searching for Portly, the lost son of Otter, are drawn to a place where the piper is playing on his reed flute. (The piper referred to is the Greek god Pan.)[1]
[edit] Release history

The original UK LP (with a monaural mix) was released on 5 August 1967, and one month later it was released in stereophonic mix. It reached #6 on the UK charts.[2]

The original US album appeared on the Tower Records division of Capitol Records in October 1967. This version (ST-5093, stereo; T-5093, mono) was officially titled simply Pink Floyd though the original album title did appear on the back cover as on the UK issue. The US album featured an abbreviated track listing and reached #131 on the Billboard charts. A UK single, "See Emily Play", was substituted for "Astronomy Dominé," "Flaming", and "Bike." The Tower Records vinyl issue also faded out "Interstellar Overdrive", and broke up the segue into "The Gnome", because the songs were re-sequenced. Later US issues on compact disc had the same title and track list as the UK version.

The Canadian LP (Capitol/EMI ST-6242) had the same title and track listing as the UK version.

In 1973, the album, along with A Saucerful of Secrets, was released as a double disc set on Capitol/EMI's Harvest Records label, titled A Nice Pair. (On the American version of that compilation, the original four-minute studio version of "Astronomy Dominé" was replaced with the eight-minute live version found on "Ummagumma"). The American edition of A Nice Pair also failed to properly restore the segue between "Interstellar Overdrive" and "The Gnome."

The stereo mix of the album was first released on Compact Disc in 1987, and re-released as a digitally re-mastered CD in 1994 and then in June 1995 in the US. In 1997 EMI released a re-mastered, limited-run mono mix version in a hefty digipak with 3-D box art for continental Europe and the world outside the United States. This mono CD included a slightly edited version of "Flaming." A six-track bonus CD, 1967: The First Three Singles, was given away alongside the 1997 30th-anniversary edition of the album.

* 1999 CD Capitol 59857
* 1987 CD Capitol C2-46384
* 1967 LP Tower ST-5093
* 1995 CD EMI 7243 8 31261 2 0
* 1994 CD Capitol 46384
* 2001 CD EMI 65731
* 1994 CD Capitol 1073

Reception
At the time of its release, the album was received positively. In subsequent years, the record has been recognised as one of the seminal psychedelic rock albums of the 1960s. In 1967, both Record Mirror and NME gave the album four stars out of five. Record Mirror commented that "the psychedelic image of the group really comes to life on this LP, which is a fine showcase for both their talent and the recording technique. Plenty of mindblowing sound." Cash Box called it a "striking collection of driving, up to date rock ventures." Paul McCartney and Pink Floyd's past producer Joe Boyd, both rated the album highly. Some, notably Pete Townshend, voiced the opinion of the underground fans, by suggesting that the album did not reflect the band's live performances. In recent years the album has gained even more recognition. In 1999 Rolling Stone Magazine gave the album 4.5 stars out of 5, calling it "the golden achievement of Syd Barrett". Q Magazine described the album as "indispensable," and included it in their best psychedelic albums of all time. It was also ranked fortieth in Mojo magazines, The 50 Most Out There Albums of all Time. In 2000 Q magazine placed The Piper at the Gates of Dawn at number 55 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. In 2003, the album was ranked number 347 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.[7] Digital Dream Door also ranked The Piper at the Gates of Dawn number 2 on the "100 Greatest Psychedelic Albums" list.[8] The album was named as one of Classic Rock magazine's "50 Albums That Built Prog Rock".[9]
[edit] Fortieth anniversary edition

A two-disc fortieth anniversary edition was released on 4 September 2007, and a three-disc set was released on 11 September 2007. The packaging, designed by Storm Thorgerson, resembles a cloth-covered book, along with a twelve page reproduction of a Syd Barrett notebook. Discs one and two contain the full 'Piper' album in the original mono mix (disc one), as well as the alternate stereo version (disc two). Both have been newly remastered by James Guthrie.

The third disc includes several Piper-era outtakes from the Abbey Road vaults, along with the band's first three mono singles. Unreleased material includes a shorter take of "Interstellar Overdrive" that was previously thought lost, the pre-overdubbed abridged mix of "Interstellar Overdrive" previously only available on an EP in France, an alternative mix of "Matilda Mother" as it appeared early in the sessions, and also the 1967 stereo mix of "Apples and Oranges," which features extra untrimmed material at the beginning and end.[citation needed]


I just finished listening to this for the first time. I only listened to the British release as i currently do not have the American release.

Since i've only listened to 'Dark Side Of The Moon', 'Wish you were here', 'The Wall', 'Animals' and 'A momentary lapse of reason' This was a bit of a different sounding Floyd. Not many songs were memorable except for "Pow R. Toc H." "Interstellar Overdrive" and "Bike" Those had the trippy Floyd feel to them. The others just sound a bit off. Maybe it';s from listening to the other albums so many times I'm used to one kind of Pink Floyd. As of now I'd rank this as my least favorite.
Old 10-03-10, 09:06 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

If you have never heard these (which it seems from your list above) you are in for a treat:



Old 10-03-10, 10:11 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Piper at the Gates of Dawn and Meddle are my two favorite Floyd albums.

There's nothing I can say about Piper that hasn't been said a billion times before, and by people more expressive than myself. All I can say is that it is simply one of the best, if not THE best psychedelic albums ever released. Floyd's patented "space rock" has never been better presented or more engagingly. SO much to love, it's unbelievable.

"Lucifer Sam" is the greatest theme song to a 60s spy movie that was never made, even if it was written about a ginger cat. And "Interstellar Overdrive", as messy as it gets, has one of the greatest, chunkiest riffs ever.

I probably prefer the mono mix to the stereo overall, but my perfect mix would be a combination of the two. "Bike" is perfect in mono, but "Interstellar Overdrive" sounds much fuller in stereo.
Old 10-04-10, 12:46 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by mhg83 View Post
Since i've only listened to 'Dark Side Of The Moon', 'Wish you were here', 'The Wall', 'Animals' and 'A momentary lapse of reason' This was a bit of a different sounding Floyd. Not many songs were memorable except for "Pow R. Toc H." "Interstellar Overdrive" and "Bike" Those had the trippy Floyd feel to them. The others just sound a bit off. Maybe it';s from listening to the other albums so many times I'm used to one kind of Pink Floyd. As of now I'd rank this as my least favorite.
Listen to it five or six more times. Astronomy Domine is up there with the best of Floyd (though the live version from Ummagumma is better) and Lucifer Sam and Chapter 24 are the very model of trippy.
Old 10-04-10, 01:55 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Hokeyboy View Post

"Lucifer Sam" is the greatest theme song to a 60s spy movie that was never made, even if it was written about a ginger cat. And "Interstellar Overdrive", as messy as it gets, has one of the greatest, chunkiest riffs ever.
I'm pretty sure this song is about a girlfriend of Barrett. He refers to her Jennifer Gentle you're a witch and he's using the cat to possibly represent her. Then again his song meanings aren't exactly completely explainable but that is what I always figured judging by lyrics.

what can I say about this album. It's the best thing they ever released and the most important album to me that took my musical tastes to 60s music. It's like a different band and it shouldn't even really be compared to the other albums except for Saucerful of Secrets.

Last edited by statcat; 10-04-10 at 02:26 AM.
Old 10-04-10, 03:44 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

I love this album. Easily Floyd's best until Dark Side of the Moon (although I do enjoy Meddle and Obscured By Clouds quite a bit), and is possibly the best album the band ever recorded. Barrett was a brilliantly twisted pop songwriter, and I wish we could have seen what would have happened had he not gone over the deep end.

There was a reason Paul McCartney championed this album and this band when Piper came out: It is, in my opinion, the single best psychedelic album ever recorded. For all the dated cultural artifacts that came out of psychedelia, this album shows what potential that movement had in it. I wouldn't say it's all downhill from here, but Pink Floyd were never this good at being this weird, while still being accessible, ever again.
Old 10-04-10, 03:58 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Suprmallet View Post
Barrett was a brilliantly twisted pop songwriter, and I wish we could have seen what would have happened had he not gone over the deep end.
well his solo stuff is pretty cool as well but kind of depressing at the same time
Old 10-04-10, 04:47 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Yeah, but his solo albums are all from after he got blitzed on drugs. I would love to have heard what he could have done had he kept his mind together if this is the first album we got from him.
Old 10-04-10, 11:37 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Lemmy View Post
I equate the Syd-era PF to the Peter-Gabriel-era Genesis; waaaayyy too artsy-fartsy for my tastes. Just unlistenable for me.

As such, I'll refrain from further comments until we get to DSOTM.
so you're not a fan of anything up to DSOTM? Meddle reminds me of it a bit and I actually prefer it as I'm kind of sick of DSOTM.
Old 10-04-10, 11:54 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Lemmy View Post
I equate the Syd-era PF to the Peter-Gabriel-era Genesis; waaaayyy too artsy-fartsy for my tastes. Just unlistenable for me.

As such, I'll refrain from further comments until we get to DSOTM.
Too bad Gabriel era Genesis is the ONLY good Genesis (well, the one album before Hackett left is OK, too). But, seriously, the Phil Collins experience Sucks. He should have stayed behind the drums...
Old 10-04-10, 12:43 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

I think Floyd was recording Piper down the hall from where the Beatles were recording Sgt Pepper. Piper is the superior album IMO.
Old 10-04-10, 01:25 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd is by far my all-time favorite band, but this album is difficult for me to assess in relation to the rest of their catalog. I admit that I'm not as familiar with it as I am their other albums, and I didn't even own a copy until a couple of years ago when the anniversary set came out (I've been a fan for 15 or so years). I always treated it like kind of a one-off curiosity. I respected it and understood the love for it (Syd really was special. How could anyone listen to Bike and not smile?), but it really didn't sound anything like "my" Floyd. However I don't think it's as much of an odd duck as it appears upon first listen. Sure they dropped the psychadelic pop stuff almost immediately after Syd left the band (or should I say after the band left Syd), but Astronomy Domine, Interstellar Overdrive and Pow R. Toc H. are quite indicative of the direction they would go in the next few years.

I think one of the most interesting aspects of the album is that while Syd is clearly the driving force, Rick's presence is felt all over. And although Rick is essential to the post-Syd Floyd sound, I'd argue that he is never more essential than he is on Piper. He really was the musical backbone of the group during this period. Despite some huge contributions to later works, I think this is the only album where Rick is operating completely free of the shadow of Roger and/or David. Syd's departure certainly opened the door for Roger and David to blossom into the artists they became, but I feel like Rick might have been a much bigger creative influence had Syd never left. Almost like Ray Manzarek to Syd's Jim Morrison.

All that said, I think you can look at this album in two ways. You can take it on it's own as a shining beacon of 60's psychedelia; the singular triumph in the career of a one-of-a-kind talent. Or you can look at it as the early seeds of a band that would go on to bigger and better things. I have a hard time seeing it as both simultaneously. Does that even make sense?
Old 10-04-10, 04:55 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Lemmy View Post
I equate the Syd-era PF to the Peter-Gabriel-era Genesis; waaaayyy too artsy-fartsy for my tastes. Just unlistenable for me.

As such, I'll refrain from further comments until we get to DSOTM.
You realize Barrett was only around for the first two albums, right?
Old 10-04-10, 05:22 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

That wasn't my point. You said you weren't going to rejoin the conversation until Dark Side of the Moon. Barrett was only around for the first two albums, and was only the driving force behind Piper. If it's Barrett you can't stand, why are you ignoring all the albums between Piper/Saucerful and Dark Side?
Old 10-04-10, 05:25 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by mhg83 View Post
I just finished listening to this for the first time. I only listened to the British release as i currently do not have the American release.

Since i've only listened to 'Dark Side Of The Moon', 'Wish you were here', 'The Wall', 'Animals' and 'A momentary lapse of reason' This was a bit of a different sounding Floyd. Not many songs were memorable except for "Pow R. Toc H." "Interstellar Overdrive" and "Bike" Those had the trippy Floyd feel to them. The others just sound a bit off. Maybe it';s from listening to the other albums so many times I'm used to one kind of Pink Floyd. As of now I'd rank this as my least favorite.
It makes for an easier transition if you work your way back gradually. I imagine my reaction would have been much the same had I gone from "classic" Floyd to the early stuff, but after buying everything from Meddle on up I turned around and went from Atom Heart backwards through to Piper.
Old 10-04-10, 08:36 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

A Saucerful of Secrets




Track listing:


1. Let There Be More Light
2. Remember A Day
3. Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun
4. Corporal Clegg
5. A Saucerful Of Secrets
6. See Saw
7. Jugband Blues

* Roger Waters – bass guitar, percussion, vocals
* Richard Wright – piano, organ, mellotron, vibraphone, vocals
* David Gilmour – guitar, vocals, kazoo
* Nick Mason – drums, percussion, vocals
* Syd Barrett – guitar, acoustic guitar, vocals

* Norman Smith – drums and backing vocals on "Remember a Day"
* The Salvation Army (The International Staff Band) on "Jugband Blues":

* Ray Bowes (cornet)
* Terry Camsey (cornet)
* Mac Carter (trombone)
* Les Condon (E♭ bass)
* Maurice Cooper (euphonium)
* Ian Hankey (trombone)
* George Whittingham (B♭ bass)
* One other uncredited musician

Spoiler:
A Saucerful of Secrets is the second studio album by English rock group Pink Floyd. It was recorded at EMI's Abbey Road Studios on various dates from August 1967 to April 1968. It is both the last Pink Floyd album on which Syd Barrett would appear and the only studio album in which all 5 band members contributed.

Recording and structure

During its difficult recording sessions, Barrett became increasingly unstable and in January 1968 David Gilmour was brought in. Barrett was finally ousted from the band in early March, leaving the new incarnation of Pink Floyd to finish the album. As a result, A Saucerful of Secrets is the only non-compilation Pink Floyd album on which all five band members appear, with Gilmour appearing on four songs ("Let There Be More Light", "Corporal Clegg", "A Saucerful of Secrets", and "See-Saw") and Barrett on three ("Remember a Day", "Jugband Blues" and "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun").

As well as "Jugband Blues", the album was to include "Vegetable Man," another Syd Barrett song. However, the band believed "Vegetable Man", with its autobiographical lyrics, was unsuitable for inclusion and so it was left off the album. The song was to appear on a single as the b-side to another unreleased track, "Scream Thy Last Scream". Two additional Syd Barrett songs "In The Beechwoods" and "No Title" were also recorded early in the sessions for the album.

Keyboardist Richard Wright sings lead vocals on four of the album's seven songs, and backing vocals on Saucerful of Secrets (song) making this the only Pink Floyd album where Wright's vocal contributions outnumber those of the rest of the band. This was also the only album to contain lead vocals by all five Pink Floyd members (Mason sings lead parts on "Corporal Clegg").

Album cover

This is the first of several Pink Floyd album covers designed by Hipgnosis, and was only the second time that an EMI group (The Beatles were the first) was permitted to hire outside designers for an album jacket.[1] Certain elements of the collage are taken from page 25 of Marvel Comics' Strange Tales #158 (1967), including the face of the Living Tribunal in the upper left, Doctor Strange along the right edge and the image of a string of planets entering a whirlpool that runs through the center of the design.

The title track was David Gilmour's first professional songwriting credit. His name is incorrectly spelled "Gilmore", an error that would persist on all pressings until finally being corrected with the 1994 remastered version.
[edit] Songs from the album

Like The Piper at the Gates of Dawn before it, the album contains space rock and psychedelic rock songs.[citation needed] But unlike Piper, which was dominated by Syd Barrett's compositions, A Saucerful of Secrets contains only one original Barrett song, "Jugband Blues".

With Barrett seemingly detached from proceedings,[citation needed] it came down to Roger Waters and Richard Wright to provide adequate material. The opening "Let There Be More Light" penned by Waters, continues the space rock approach established by Barrett. Both "Remember a Day" and "See-Saw" use the child-like approach that was established on their debut. Wright remained critical of his early contributions to the band.[2]

"Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun" (another Waters' composition) is a space rock number which was first performed with Barrett in 1967. The success of the track was such that it remained in their live set-list until 1973 where it appeared in a greatly extended form. Waters later performed the track during solo concerts from 1984 and later. Waters borrowed the lyrics from a book of Chinese Poetry from the Tang Dynasty, like Barrett had used in "Chapter 24".

"Corporal Clegg," written by Roger Waters, is the first Pink Floyd song to address issues of war, a theme which would endure throughout the career of Waters as a songwriter for the band, culminating in the 1983 album The Final Cut. This song also features Nick Mason on lead vocals, marking the first official release in which use is made of Mason's vocals..
Release history

In the UK the album was released on 29 June 1968 on EMI's Columbia label as both mono (SX 6258) and stereo (SCX 6258) LPs. It reached number nine in the charts.[citation needed] In the US it was released by the Tower Records division of Capitol, where it remains the only Pink Floyd album to not chart.[citation needed] However, when reissued as A Nice Pair, with the original version of The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn after the success of The Dark Side of the Moon, the album did chart at number 39 on the Billboard Hot 200.

The CD stereo mix of the album was first released in 1987, and in 1992 was digitally remastered and reissued as part of the Shine On box-set. The remastered stereo CD was released on its own in 1994 in the UK, and then in April 1995 in the US. The mono mix version of the album has never been officially released on CD.


I enjoyed this album more than Pipers. It sounded trippier and had a good feel to it and was soaking in the music. I enjoyed every song especially 'A saucerful of Secrets' felt like i was in another place mentally and mellowed me out more than the other songs. That's what i love most about Floyds music. I can have a crappy day at work, come home, pop in a Floyd CD and just unwind and relax.

Great Album!
Old 10-04-10, 08:54 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Jeez, only one day to discuss an album? This one is going to go by quick, and people are going to be jumping around in their discussion.

Anyway, I feel about the same as Rocket1312 about Piper. There are some good tracks, but several are just a bit too out there for me. I like odd music, but I started out with later-era Floyd, so this one came as an unwelcome surprise. I've come to enjoy and appreciate it more over the past couple of years, though.


Saucer has one of my favorite songs in Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun. I love that track.
Old 10-05-10, 01:52 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

it's a good album but nowhere near piper at the gates of dawn. My favorite track is Remember a Day then maybe Let There Be More Light. Jugband Blues is a sad farewell from Barrett. It makes me wonder why Vegetable Man and Scream Thy Last Scream were never officially released to this day.
Old 10-05-10, 02:55 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Saucerful definitely suffers from Barrett's quick disintegration, although some of the tracks, such as "Set The Controls For The Heart of The Sun," are classic Floyd. It's not one I listen to often.
Old 10-05-10, 09:18 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

A decent album but a big step down from Piper. It's much less consistent, although there are some good songs and one great one.
Old 10-05-10, 10:33 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Lemmy View Post
Because they wore that Syd-influence (whether he was there or not) a bit too much until DSOTM. They were too inaccessable to many listeners (myself included) until they got a bit more tangible, song-wise, if you will.
tangible as in making songs about Barrett like Shine on You Crazy Diamond, Wish You Were Here, Brain Damage, Nobody Home, Empty Spaces, etc? They wore that influence their whole career but it's not like anything they released after saucerful of secrets sounds a lot like piper at the gates of dawn.

Last edited by statcat; 10-05-10 at 10:40 AM.
Old 10-05-10, 11:17 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Lemmy View Post
Because they wore that Syd-influence (whether he was there or not) a bit too much until DSOTM. They were too inaccessable to many listeners (myself included) until they got a bit more tangible, song-wise, if you will.
Gotta disagree there. Obscured By Clouds and Meddle are far closer to the style and sound of DSOTM than they are to Piper, Saucerful, or Umma Gumma. Most people think "One Of These Days" is a DSOTM song, and "Childhood's End" and "Free Four" are about as accessible as Floyd ever got.
Old 10-05-10, 11:59 AM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Originally Posted by Hokeyboy View Post
Gotta disagree there. Obscured By Clouds and Meddle are far closer to the style and sound of DSOTM than they are to Piper, Saucerful, or Umma Gumma. Most people think "One Of These Days" is a DSOTM song, and "Childhood's End" and "Free Four" are about as accessible as Floyd ever got.
"See Emily Play" is probably the most commercial/mainstream/pop song they recorded.
Old 10-05-10, 12:37 PM
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Re: Album by Album: Pink Floyd

Yah, I gotta disagree with Lemmy. He may find the pre-DSOTM albums inaccessible (and that's fine), but I think the stuff they did after Syd left had nothing to do with Syd. Syd wrote these whimisical little pop songs (which were a bit strange mind you), but the band started doing all of this long form instrumental, spacey, freak out stuff because they knew they couldn't replicate Syd's style. All you have to do is listen to Syd's solo stuff to get an idea of what Pink Floyd may have been had Syd not left. It sounds nothing like what they were doing during the 68-72 period. If you think the pre-DSOTM stuff is inaccessible, it's mostly because the guys were trying to find their niche as they developed as musicians and songwriters.

As far as Saucerful goes, it's definitely an album by a band in transistion. It's a mish-mash of varying quality that's nowhere near as cohesive as Piper. That being said, this album sees Roger starting to develop as a songwriter, features one of Rick's better songs (Remember a Day), and while it's not high on my list of all-time favorites, you can't deny the haunting prescience of the lyrics to Jugband Blues. Oh, I also kind of like Let There Be More Light. It's goofy sci-fi, but it has a certain charm that I really like.

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