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Theatrical 3D: Are All Polarized 3D Glasses the Same?

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Theatrical 3D: Are All Polarized 3D Glasses the Same?

Old 12-19-08, 03:29 PM
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DRG
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Theatrical 3D: Are All Polarized 3D Glasses the Same?

Our local theater is equipped with Digital projection and has been getting most of the big 3d releases. I've enjoyed these, and know that the 3d theatrical trend is just going to get bigger, with things like My Bloody Valentine and James Cameron's Avatar next year.

My question is: are all polarized 3d glasses the same? My theater uses RealD glasses, which work fine, but I wear glasses and it's a bit of a nuisance to wear overlapping pairs.

Then I found this: http://www.rainbowsymphonystore.com/plpo3dglclon.html

Basically they are Clip-On Style 3D Polarized Glasses, which would be perfect for glasses-wearers like myself. But is there only one 'type' of polarized 3d glasses technology? Also, I notice they offer two different angles: mounted at 45/135 & 0/90 degree angles. What's the difference?
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Old 12-19-08, 06:09 PM
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Nope, the Real D glasses use circular polarization, while the tradional type used for older 3-D movies have linear polarized lenses.

The circular type are better because they cut down on ghosting and allow moviegoers a greater degree of head movement.

Keep in mind a smaller number of digital theaters are using the Dolby 3-D system, which uses a completely different type of glasses.
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Old 12-19-08, 06:39 PM
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Theatrical film 3D is different from the DVD 3D, right? In the theater, are they using some special 3D projector? In other words, what are the reasons why the 3D movies in the theater are better than their DVD home theater counterparts?
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Old 12-20-08, 06:31 PM
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I want to see My Bloody Valentine next month in 3D,but I also wear glasses. Are the realD glasses easy to wear with regular glasses? The realD website claims so. But I don't even know what the glasses look like. I don't want to pay extra money to see a 3D movie and find out the glasses don't work well over my prescription pair.
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Old 12-23-08, 12:14 PM
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The Polarized glasses you get when seeing a Real D presentation are very comfortable, and will easily fit over eyeglasses. They resemble a pair of sunglasses, with plastic frames.
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Old 12-25-08, 09:03 PM
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Try this 3D Glasses

Scroll down and find the 3D Circular Polarized glasses. They have clip-ons among others.

Last edited by caligulathegod; 12-25-08 at 09:08 PM.
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Old 12-25-08, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Julie Walker View Post
Are the realD glasses easy to wear with regular glasses? The realD website claims so. But I don't even know what the glasses look like.
They look like this:
http://www.ultimate3dheaven.com/re3dglpo.html

Maybe the next time you go see a movie at that theater, you can ask to see a pair of the glasses and test them.
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Old 12-25-08, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by toddly6666 View Post
Theatrical film 3D is different from the DVD 3D, right? In the theater, are they using some special 3D projector? In other words, what are the reasons why the 3D movies in the theater are better than their DVD home theater counterparts?
In 3D theaters, they use polarized lenses to polarize the images for each eye, and the screen is a special type, usually silver-coated, that properly reflects polarized light.

For Home Theater, the vast majority of TVs cannot output polarized light. Therefore, they're left with two other options:

1) The red-blue "anaglyph" glasses. These glasses don't work very well.

2) Alternating "shutter" glasses. These work OK, but are fairly cumbersome and require synchronization between the glasses and the TV.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3-D_film
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