Movie Talk A Discussion area for everything movie related including films In The Theaters

The Seventh Seal

Old 01-19-04, 02:28 AM
  #1  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Boulder, CO / Lemont, IL
Posts: 161
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The Seventh Seal

After hearing so much about Ingmar Bergman, I was really excited to see this. But I couldn't even stay awake through the whole thing. Maybe it's considered such a great film because it was ahead of its time? I'm really hoping that it's different than some of Bergman's later work.
Old 01-19-04, 06:01 AM
  #2  
Banned by request
 
Supermallet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Termite Terrace
Posts: 54,150
Likes: 0
Received 5 Likes on 5 Posts
In my opinion, it's still a gripping, powerful film. Not Bergman's best, but way up there. I would say most of Bergman's stuff is like this, but, in fact, this is more active than a lot of his work. Most of his films are about characters in emotional turmoil. The only film of his with more action would be The Magic Flute, I would say, but then, does that really count?

Thinking over it again, the film is really varied. There's the philosophical musings of the knight, the almost surreal sequence with the religious fanatics who whip themselves, the horror of watching someone burned alive for being a heretic, and it's all counterbalanced with the antics of the jesters. Maybe you should give it another view.
Old 01-19-04, 07:52 AM
  #3  
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 3,220
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I dont find the film slow or anything...even has a kid I could make it through the film...that was when I originally watched it...at the age of around 11 or 12 I think...and I thought it was great back then and it held a grip on me...still one of the best movies ever made...
Old 01-19-04, 08:54 AM
  #4  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Lakewood,OH,USA
Posts: 1,927
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If you can't stay awake for The Seventh Seal, you better steer clear of the rest of Bergman's films. It's one of the most "interesting" in terms of action.
Old 01-19-04, 09:53 AM
  #5  
MrN
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: B.W.I.
Posts: 3,699
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Re: The Seventh Seal

Originally posted by CUBuffsMike41
After hearing so much about Ingmar Bergman (snip)
Makes me wonder if all you heard were superficial reviews.

Bergman films are more about philosophies and emotions than anything else. If you've never felt like living in a world without a God, then I'm sure The Seventh Seal is sleep inducing.

Reminds me of an anecdote I heard about how Bergman visited a Hollywood set. Bergman had never seen a 'squib' and so when Charles Bronson heard about this he asked, "So how do you use machine guns in your films?"
Old 01-19-04, 11:19 AM
  #6  
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 994
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally posted by bdots48
If you can't stay awake for The Seventh Seal, you better steer clear of the rest of Bergman's films. It's one of the most "interesting" in terms of action.
He could give Cries and Whispers a shot. Its cerebral, but still accessible to the lay person.
Old 01-19-04, 11:34 AM
  #7  
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Mouthweathercity, IL.
Posts: 3,521
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
From your DVD collection, you have a lot of Woody Allen (good for you). Did you know that Woody Allen’s favorite directors are Bergman and Fellini. This is apparent in September, which is a Bergmanesque film.

IMHO, Seventh Seal is one of the best films ever, and as François Truffaut stated in his film 400 Blows, "The film had depth." Not referring to Seventh Seal, but it is the point that he makes. Seventh Seal has depth, and it is not a film that comes to you. You have to actively participate in the film as if you read a book or view some art at the Louvre. As you peel away the different layers you find something anew and eventually you breathe the film as you view it.

MrN - the Charles Bronson quote was great.
Old 01-19-04, 04:13 PM
  #8  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Boulder, CO / Lemont, IL
Posts: 161
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally posted by DVD Smurf
From your DVD collection, you have a lot of Woody Allen (good for you). Did you know that Woody Allen’s favorite directors are Bergman and Fellini. This is apparent in September, which is a Bergmanesque film.
The thing is, September is by far my favorite Woody Allen film. Another similar one I love is Interiors. Each about pretty extensive emotional turmoil, and pretty cerebral. Allen's dramas/serious works are by far my favorite, and I expected to have the same immediate love for Bergman (I was aware of Allen's influence from Bergman). I'm also pretty into existentialist philosophy, so I don't think it was necessarily my poor taste or being a "laymen" or themes going over my head that kept me from enjoying Seventh Seal. Perhaps I wasn't in the appropriate mindset to really enjoy it, and I'll watch it again with a more active approach. But I felt like the philosophical musings were a little sophomoric, and the plot kind of dragged. Both Cries and Whispers and the other Bermang film called "problems in Marriage" or something to that effect looked really really interesting to me, so I'll give those a try also.
Old 01-19-04, 04:15 PM
  #9  
Moderator
 
Groucho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 71,383
Received 120 Likes on 82 Posts
I've found Wild Strawberries to be Bergman's most "accessable" film. Although, looking at the plot summary one might never guess it.
Old 01-19-04, 07:14 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
Posts: 883
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
My personal favorite is Bergman's 1983 masterpiece "Fanny and Alexander," an almost Dickensian fable about a Swedish family. It's very long. And every minute is just wonderful. I think this is by far his most accessible film. It was nominated for something like six Oscars, winning something like three). Alas, it's not available on DVD yet. You'll have to scrounge-up a VHS copy.
Old 01-19-04, 07:18 PM
  #11  
Banned by request
 
Supermallet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Termite Terrace
Posts: 54,150
Likes: 0
Received 5 Likes on 5 Posts
Originally posted by Grouch094820 & 5/17
I've found Wild Strawberries to be Bergman's most "accessable" film. Although, looking at the plot summary one might never guess it.
I agree with you on this one. For the money, I think Wild Strawberries is his best film.

If you liked Interiors, perhaps you should try Through A Glass Darkly.
Old 01-19-04, 08:20 PM
  #12  
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Mouthweathercity, IL.
Posts: 3,521
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally posted by Suprmallet
If you liked Interiors, perhaps you should try Through A Glass Darkly.
Very true... I saw this a month ago for the first time, what was I thinking? Waiting so long for such a good movie...
Old 01-19-04, 09:04 PM
  #13  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 45
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
You should see Winter Light and The Silence.
Old 01-20-04, 06:40 AM
  #14  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 5,919
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally posted by CUBuffsMike41
The thing is, September is by far my favorite Woody Allen film. Another similar one I love is Interiors. Each about pretty extensive emotional turmoil, and pretty cerebral.
Well in that case I would say if you stick with Bergman you'll find things you like. In my opinion, Allen never imitated Bergman more than he did in Interiors. Sure, several of Allen's films have qualities of Bergman, but Interiors always stuck out in my mind as being the most obvious one. I can see how The Seventh Seal may have been not what you were expecting then.

Scenes From A Marriage may be more of what you are looking for, but Criterion's dvd set does not come out until March.
http://www.criterionco.com/asp/release.asp?id=229 I am very excited about this release because I have never seen the 5 hour television version before.

Otherwise, I think I would first recommend either the box set containing Through A Glass Darkly/Winter Light/The Silence http://www.criterionco.com/asp/boxed_set.asp?id=208 or Cries and Whispers http://www.criterionco.com/asp/release.asp?id=101
Old 12-31-05, 12:24 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 294
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I thought this film was incredibly boring. The only interesting interactions are between the knight and Death and those are far between and few. Even with the philosophical musings it isn't all that thought-provoking when you consider that any ordinary man has deliberated whether or not god exists, if there is emptiness after death, the terror of that notion, etc...
actually, the musings are quite shallow.

I just don't see how this film is hailed as one of the greatest.
Old 12-31-05, 04:42 AM
  #16  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Dark City
Posts: 4,218
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
I didn't really like it either. It actually scared me off of Bergman for a while. I haven't seen much by him beside Virgin Spring and the Criterion box set (Through a Glass Darkly, The Silence, Winter Light). I enjoyed the box set very much, particularly Winter Light and Through a Glass...)

I'm looking forward to viewing Virgin Spring again. I saw it during my college years in the late 80's and remember liking it.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.