Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > DVD Discussions > DVD Talk
Reload this Page >

Anyone else afraid of the format changes? (format threads merged)

DVD Talk Talk about DVDs and Movies on DVD including Covers and Cases

Anyone else afraid of the format changes? (format threads merged)

Old 03-15-05, 10:16 AM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 53
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Anyone else afraid of the format changes and possibly losing all their DVDs?

I've got a record collection numbering in the 1000s, and before I inherited it, was kept in probably the worst condition possible... a damp, dark closet of a room just stacked on top of each other. I can take out any of those records, give it a quick clean, and they still sound beautiful on my turntable.

This wont be the case with DVDs, will it? My DVDs have been kept in the utmost care... I am very careful about protecting against scratches, ETC. They are stored in two huge bookcases in my room..

Now.. what is the expected shelf life of DVDs? I doubt that my kids gonna be able to pick out a DVD and just watch it like I can pick out my fathers records from the 60s and give it a listen... Do you all think it will be possible to back up DVDs completely (extras and all) on the new format so that our collections may be preserved?
Old 03-15-05, 10:31 AM
  #2  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: CANADA
Posts: 2,020
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I have a collection of about 560 DVDs.

I am concerned that if the new "standard" becomes Blu-Ray, and that gets universally adopted that I will reach a point where my $8500 investment is useless.
Old 03-15-05, 10:31 AM
  #3  
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: 'cuse, NY
Posts: 153
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
if you can still buy new record players I think in 30 years you'll still find a way to play a DVD. Sure there are people who will convert their collections to the newest format, but many more that will not rebuy what they already own. Companies would be stupid to not offer at least some way offering backwards compatability. Besides its not like blu-ray or the other new HD DVD formats are a completely different format, they are still discs read by a laser....
Old 03-15-05, 10:33 AM
  #4  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 53
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
True, SRot, but I thought I had read somewhere that DVDs last at best 10 years under the best care... is this the case?
Old 03-15-05, 10:36 AM
  #5  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: CANADA
Posts: 2,020
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I think you're referring to the infamous "DVD rot". Some people swear there is no such thing, others swear there is. I have yet to read anything that absolutely proves one side of the argument or the other.
Old 03-15-05, 10:55 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 610
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If a pressed DVD is going to deteriorate, it will probably do so within a couple of years of manufacture; the sorts of defects that lead to oxydation aren't something that lies fallow for 10 years and then suddenly manifests.

This is still a problem for people with big collections. I have discs that I bought in 1998 that I haven't watched since. They were fine when they were new. Are they fine now? I don't have time to play every disc in my collection every two years.

Yet "DVD rot" can affect only one part of a disc, randomly, and it's not usually detectable without actually playing the disc.

I don't think there will be problems finding equipment to play DVDs in 20 or 30 years. And I don't really think anything will prevent copying multiple DVDs onto higher-capacity storage in the future, as long as hackers thrive. But I personally worry that I might have several DVDs that have oxydized without my knowing it.

Although it's only actually happened to me once, with "A Bridge Too Far." Every other one of my older discs that I've revisited has been fine.

RichC
Old 03-15-05, 11:09 AM
  #7  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Hollywood
Posts: 1,021
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
DVDs contain data files read by a laser. This data will always be retrievable within your lifetime. It's as simple as that.
Old 03-15-05, 11:32 AM
  #8  
Moderator
 
nemein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: 1bit away from total disaster
Posts: 34,150
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
WRT the change to HD/blu-ray I'm not too concerned, sure the movies might not look as good but they'll still play. Once they pick something besides the 5" disc then it'll be a concern. It will happen eventually (how many 8 tracks do you see these days ) but in the meantime I'm going to enjoy my collection.
Old 03-15-05, 11:41 AM
  #9  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Triangle, NC, USA
Posts: 8,810
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
DVD's aren't an investment like the stock market, except in very rare collectible-type instances. Virtually every tangible item except land or homes decreases in value, especially electronics.
They're an investment for you and your family, if you like them [the dvd's, not your family]. I definitely plan to share some favorites with my boy when he gets a little older; not everything will be converted to HDDVD on release day or even in the near future.
I would definitely think the DVD format will be playable for years. They're still making record players, after all [have to hunt for an 8-track player though]. And as big a DvD is, people will have players to sell second hand for years as well.
I think I found a study that showed DVD rot did occur, but it was only on a very select group of DVD disks that basically had 'defects' and are no longer in production. I've had cassettes go bad as well.
Old 03-15-05, 11:47 AM
  #10  
DVD Talk Legend
 
asianxcore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 16,390
Likes: 0
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
no worries here. I doubt they will re-release everything I've bought in the new format. what I do have a question about is if there is a new DVD format, do you think it will drive down the prices of regular DVD format DVD (ala DVD driving down prices of VHS')?
Old 03-15-05, 12:06 PM
  #11  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: City of the lakers.. riots.. and drug dealing cops.. los(t) Angel(e)s. ca.
Posts: 54,199
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I'm not worried. I've done plenty of format changes before. Just have to go with what you like.
Old 03-15-05, 12:26 PM
  #12  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Marina Del Rey, California
Posts: 9,918
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
It's the natural progression of technology that declares DVD's will soon be an inferior format. However, like VHS & Beta before it...there will still be a way to enjoy the medium. Will our investments / collections become worthless? Only if we think of them that way.
Old 03-15-05, 12:38 PM
  #13  
Fok
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Fok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Canada, BC
Posts: 6,689
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yeah this has crossed my mind as well, but I guess that's the way it is. I'm more worried about double dipping when the new format comes out.
Old 03-15-05, 01:36 PM
  #14  
Needs to contact an admin about multiple accounts
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 475
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally there was a concern because it looked like HD-DVD was the only format which would have backwards compatibility to play regular DVDs, but since then the Sony company has stated that BR will indeed be able to play regular DVD as well...so not an issue.

DVD Rot is most likely like CD Rot. I have well over 2000 CDs, many of which are over 2 decades old (we stopped buying CDs when we started buying DVDs instead) and have yet to experience CD Rot.

We don't really consider our CDs or DVDs as investments. Many of the records or CDs we have are still in production today, which devalues the older copies bought years ago. The same will undoubtably be true with today's DVDs. We didn't buy them hoping they will increase in value, they are for family entertainment. For those who do want to buy things for value purposes...there are always antiques, old comic books, books & toys or basically anything with low production runs or something most people throw away which may have nostalgic value long after their day!
Old 03-15-05, 01:42 PM
  #15  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Docking Bay 94
Posts: 14,259
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
DVD is the most successful electronic product in history. There are hundreds of millions of players out there, with millions more shipping monthly, and no end in sight.

There's really no reason to worry that you (or your heirs) will not be able to watch DVDs. You'll be able to play these discs for your entire lifetime, and well beyond...
Old 03-16-05, 01:19 PM
  #16  
DVD Talk Reviewer
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: NY
Posts: 3,364
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This has worried me a lot as well. This and the idea of some DVD's 'rotting'. But, VHS had a very long life, a couple of decades. I don't think there's really reason to be too concerned about upgrading your collection if you don't want to feel like you own a 'wasted investment', for quite a long time. So, that provides me SOME comfort, but I know eventually, EVENTUALLY, someday it will be time to say good-bye to my DVD collection. BUT, if you're REALLY concerned, I suggest when DVD players are just about to become obsolete in the distant future, and companies decide to stop making DVD players, just buy three or four to last you for the rest of your life to be safe if it makes you feel better. They'll be insanely cheap by then.
Old 03-16-05, 01:33 PM
  #17  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,616
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The tricky balance in introducing a new format is making you WANT to replace your old collection. CD's did it. DVD's did it. And no doubt when a new format is (sucessfully) introduced, we'll still be able to play our current DVD's on it but won't want to. I've owned several audio and video formats and never once felt ripped off that I'm not still listening to 8 tracks or watching a Betamax.

The day Titanic came out on VHS, I saw a lady buying two copies because 'it might be worth something someday'.
Old 03-16-05, 01:59 PM
  #18  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Docking Bay 94
Posts: 14,259
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Eddie W
The day Titanic came out on VHS, I saw a lady buying two copies because 'it might be worth something someday'.
Argument #1 against letting people invest their own Social Security money.
Old 03-16-05, 02:42 PM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 324
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Eddie W
The tricky balance in introducing a new format is making you WANT to replace your old collection. CD's did it. DVD's did it.
That's because the old technology had obvious flaws (like vulnerable to scratching, large size, having to rewind, etc) and the new technology fixed these flaws, and was noticably better in quality than the old one.

It takes both components to cause a technology change. The lack of flaws fixed is why none of the audio formats have caught on, and why plain cd's are still the standard. Essentially, it's the "Good Enough" principle, and cd's are "Good Enough".

The same thing is going to happen to DVD. It's going to be the standard for at least 10 more years. Blu-Ray et al will not push DVD aside.
Old 03-16-05, 02:59 PM
  #20  
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Stockton, CA
Posts: 127
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
in 10 or so years (maybe sooner ;-) I'll probably have all my dvds and cds backed up onto my 10 terabyte media server streaming movies and music throughout my house. I'll keep the media around of course but prolly won't use 'em again =)

Seriously... it'll probably happen. Media servers today are just too expensive and not large enough for OUR collections.
Old 03-17-05, 01:58 PM
  #21  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: I have always been here.
Posts: 1,917
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I disposed of my record collection around 1987 (about 300 items) by copying them on to cassettes. I was moving from NJ to SF and didn't care to move something as heavy as an album. The next year I started buying CDs (about $10 each, used for about $8). Albums were going for that much new at the time. I used the cassettes for my car for years to come and my CD collection grew past my original album totals. I was never into VHS so only had about 20 of them and half were copied off TV. DVD has been the first media I was attracted to for collecting movies. One way to get me to rebuy into a new format is to get more information on a smaller disc, like a mini-disc that can hold an entire season. I would start over for that . Of course the quality would have to be better also. I don't even look at my VCD and MovieCD collections. I gave most away and only have a few left.

Last edited by pagansoul; 03-17-05 at 02:00 PM.
Old 03-17-05, 02:08 PM
  #22  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 2,934
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
As long as you take care of them and don't play them constantly every day they should last fine.

Also, if you want to backup there are already DL DVD-R discs.
Old 03-17-05, 03:58 PM
  #23  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 4,389
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Damed
I have a collection of about 560 DVDs.

I am concerned that if the new "standard" becomes Blu-Ray, and that gets universally adopted that I will reach a point where my $8500 investment is useless.
Mutual funds real estate and certificates of deposit are investments. DVDs are not. They lose their value the second you open them.
Old 03-17-05, 04:52 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 844
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I buy movies I like to watch repeatedly. Sure, I get upset thinking about replacing current dvd's with High Definition DVD but the upcoming newer format has also helped keep my current purchases to a minimum.
Old 03-17-05, 05:18 PM
  #25  
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Talent, OR
Posts: 1,053
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Qui Gon Jim
DVDs are not. They lose their value the second you open them.
So did the Criterion version of Salo cost about $1,000 when it came out?

That's the only way I could explain the prices it's going for on eBay with what you just said.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.