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DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

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DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Old 10-04-10, 05:53 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by Alan Smithee View Post
If you can't sympathize with people who buy porn, maybe you'd be angry if you 'bought' a Disney movie online, then they decided to put that movie on moratorium for a decade, meaning you wouldn't have access to it anymore?

Stuff going offline is just too big a can of worms for me to deal with- if the quality improves I can see streaming taking the place of rentals, but not collecting.
Or even worse, you Purchase a Movie or TV Show, then someone associated with that Show comes forward with an objection, (Royalties, "Political Correctness", ect) so that show is then taken offline. No Thanks! I'd rather have the Physical Media. This way, I still have my Copy, and if anyone want's it, they can have it, AFTER THEY UNWRAP MY COLD, DEAD FINGERS FROM AROUND IT!
Old 10-04-10, 08:08 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by Drake View Post
Well there you go, then why would people want to stop owning titles?...There are no guarantees that all these titles would stay on a streaming network.

So you might be able to stream The Rockford Files now , BUT in 5/10 years someone may determine to pull it because there is no market for it?
Exactly, Netflix already pulls/expires streaming movies so you'd be screwed if you didn't have the DVD. You're at the whim of the provider. Not to mention download caps by internet providers.
Old 10-04-10, 08:09 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by orangerunner View Post
I grew up in the early 1980s with having to watch the Sunday Night Movie on ABC which premiered a "new" movie three years after it came out in theatres. The movie channel was grossly expensive and a VCR was $700 minimum and blank tapes for that VCR were $15 each.

Owning studio pre-recorded tapes was completely unheard of as they were made almost strictly for the rental market. I think Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom was the first new release "sell-through" priced title in 1986 at $29.95.

I placed a real sense of value on being able to watch a movie at home and owning the original copy of the movie.

Nowadays it's all seen as cheap and disposable. You can buy a DVD cheaper than you buy a National Enquirer magazine. A DVD player is the same price as a family meal at McDonald's. DVD-R blanks are $.20 a piece (same price as a stick of licorice?). Netflix is $7.99/month all-you-can-watch. 350 channels to choose from on satellite, youtube, web surfing etc.

Yet there's still only 24 hours in a day to take it all in.

I can no longer justify buying new dvds for my collection. For one thing, I already have enough dvds to keep me busy for years.

Also, I feel burned by the decimation of the used dvd market. I have a collection that I spend thousands on, and it is now practically worthless. Same thing happening with blu-rays already. Expensive tv on dvd seasons now average for $10 or less on the used market. I checked out Hastings sale last week, and was shocked to see Deadwood seasons going for $12 bucks! I certainly would not have gone hog wild on dvd purchases if I knew I couldn't resell them in the future.


Also, technology now has made it pointless for me to own the physical media. I can buy a 1T external hard drive for a $100 bucks and fill it up with hours of content. Programs like dvdfab allow me to make an exact copy of the dvd including menus. Then my media player plays the dvd just like a disc in the player. Certainly more convenient to have the content at my fingertips rather than shuffling through my shelves to find the physical media.
Old 10-04-10, 09:55 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by matome View Post
Exactly, Netflix already pulls/expires streaming movies so you'd be screwed if you didn't have the DVD. You're at the whim of the provider.
Netflix is a rental service, so it's kind of apples/oranges since you and the person you're quoting are talking about owning a disc.

I don't even know why people are fighting when physical media isn't going away. The only change is that now there's the option for online. They're both living next door to each other and neither one is moving away.
Old 10-04-10, 10:12 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by Mister Peepers View Post
Netflix is a rental service, so it's kind of apples/oranges since you and the person you're quoting are talking about owning a disc.

I don't even know why people are fighting when physical media isn't going away. The only change is that now there's the option for online. They're both living next door to each other and neither one is moving away.
We are not fighting ,we are discussing ........

Anyway the poster above your post is saying he is not buying any longer because he can just store on a hard drive.

I have a friend who just recently signed up for Netflix streaming and he loves it and told me he feels funny knowing he bought all these DVDs and they are sitting in a closet when now he can just stream them.

I also think some people think Streaming means they own them or that they will be there forever in their queue...I don't know that's the feeling I get from listening to my friend.
Old 10-04-10, 11:07 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by dvdjunkie32 View Post
Also, I feel burned by the decimation of the used dvd market. I have a collection that I spend thousands on, and it is now practically worthless. [snip] I certainly would not have gone hog wild on dvd purchases if I knew I couldn't resell them in the future.
Someone really ought to compile a list of the most important lessons to be learned from this forum. Right after "Use the search feature!" would be, "DVDs are not investments." The up-shot is, even though you feel what you've already bought is de-valued, are you not aware that you can now continue your wanton buying ways at lower prices by being (gasp!) patient?

Also, technology now has made it pointless for me to own the physical media. I can buy a 1T external hard drive for a $100 bucks and fill it up with hours of content. Programs like dvdfab allow me to make an exact copy of the dvd including menus. Then my media player plays the dvd just like a disc in the player. Certainly more convenient to have the content at my fingertips rather than shuffling through my shelves to find the physical media.
Firstly, I'm not sure of the legality of this solution. I defer to others.
Secondly, you still have to have an actual physical disc from which to make your copy. Then, you have to hope that your hard drive does not become corrupted. (And yes, it can even happen to you and the specific model you buy.) I'm a fan of Digital Copy; I like knowing that I've got Batman on every format from the Digibook Blu-ray down to the original pan & scan VHS I got for my birthday in 1989. I can watch it on my iPod if I'm so inclined, because the aforementioned Blu-ray included a Digital Copy. (For most movies, though, I don't care enough to be concerned with such redundancy.)

But, I've had one external hard drive become corrupted already, and the only reason I was able to salvage all of my Digital Copy movies is that I keep them stored permanently on my iPod and was able to transfer them back to my restored library to replace the damaged and lost files. I'm paranoid and keep them all on my iPod now, but they eat up an awful lot of storage capacity. They can be backed up to disc, of course...except I don't have a DVD burner on my PC and they're too big to fit on a CD-R!

So, to borrow a line, "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed." I'm content to stream content from Netflix as an alternative to the hassle of the old video store system, but when it comes down to my actual favorites, I favor a format where, if something goes wrong, I'm personally to blame. Let it be that I misplaced a disc, or had the poor judgment to lend it to a family member; I'd hate to be at the mercy of whether or not a hard drive would stay operational.
Old 10-04-10, 11:25 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by Wannabe View Post
At some point in the future, the films you watch will no longer have a physical form. You'll either order them as "Video on Demand" or you'll download them to your computer/entertaiment system's hard drive.

Once any film is available to watch at any time, will people still cherish their DVD collections? Or will they view DVDs as "old space wasting technology"?

And if the film just resides on your hard drive, do you still feel like you own it?
The original poster bumped this thread after five-and-a-half years but I'd like to hear how he feels his original questions have been answered--or not answered--in that time. How close are we to what he speculated about, compared to 2005?

Me, I'm hanging on to my VHS/DVD collection. I don't rent or download or stream. I watched two films over the weekend on VHS, one 49 years old and one 79 years old, both first-time viewings. (The 79-year-old film is the more memorable and it's one of the most interesting American films I've seen in quite a few weeks.)

Last edited by Ash Ketchum; 10-04-10 at 01:15 PM.
Old 10-04-10, 11:36 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by MinLShaw View Post

So, to borrow a line, "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed." ...
The ability to stream a movie is insignificant compared to the power of physical media, I agree.
Old 10-04-10, 11:45 AM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

I really hope that Discs don't go "out of fasion", becuase I love the case and feeling that I have a collection. I love filling my walls with shelves of them, becuase they look so cool Going from that to some crappy files on an iTunes like computer progamme would be like swapping a chest of gold to a chest of sand.
Old 10-04-10, 12:07 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

The concept of streaming media to my computer (or any other device) doesn't appeal to me in the slightest. I purchase the movies I like on physical media, I pay for them once, I can watch them whenever I want, however many times I want to, forever. I like having my DVD collection, it's something I can look at, be proud of, I can peruse and choose any movie I want to, anytime I want, I OWN it. I can do with it anything I want to do with it, any time I want to do it. I can show it off to friends or family, I can check out the special features if I want to, watch "making of's", as long as I take care of it I can keep it for as long as I want to and watch it as many times as I want to. Owning the physical media puts a smile on my face, I'd rather own the movie than rent it (or stream it) any day of the week. -kd5-
Old 10-04-10, 12:19 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by kd5 View Post
The concept of streaming media to my computer (or any other device) doesn't appeal to me in the slightest. I purchase the movies I like on physical media, I pay for them once, I can watch them whenever I want, however many times I want to, forever. I like having my DVD collection, it's something I can look at, be proud of, I can peruse and choose any movie I want to, anytime I want, I OWN it. I can do with it anything I want to do with it, any time I want to do it. I can show it off to friends or family, I can check out the special features if I want to, watch "making of's", as long as I take care of it I can keep it for as long as I want to and watch it as many times as I want to. Owning the physical media puts a smile on my face, I'd rather own the movie than rent it (or stream it) any day of the week. -kd5-

What will you do when they stop making dvd players, and your player bites the dust?
Old 10-04-10, 12:19 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by kd5 View Post
The concept of streaming media to my computer (or any other device) doesn't appeal to me in the slightest. I purchase the movies I like on physical media, I pay for them once, I can watch them whenever I want, however many times I want to, forever. I like having my DVD collection, it's something I can look at, be proud of, I can peruse and choose any movie I want to, anytime I want, I OWN it. I can do with it anything I want to do with it, any time I want to do it. I can show it off to friends or family, I can check out the special features if I want to, watch "making of's", as long as I take care of it I can keep it for as long as I want to and watch it as many times as I want to. Owning the physical media puts a smile on my face, I'd rather own the movie than rent it (or stream it) any day of the week. -kd5-
I can appreciate these arguments, but for the price of a pair of $5 blind buys I can stream unlimited content from Netflix, maximizing my exposure to features I would ordinarily not see. For instance, last month I partook in the Criterion Challenge despite only actually owning two Criterion DVDs. Those things aren't cheap, and rarely turn up used around here. Thanks to Netflix, I was able to stream more than 20 Criterion titles for much less than it would have cost to have bought one--even during Barnes & Noble's famed 50% off sale in August.

If you've got the money to justify outright buying any title you think you may ever want to see, then more power to ya. Our entertainment budget has diminished dramatically, and while there are still some occasional titles I or my wife will really want to own on Blu-ray or DVD, we've found ourselves rather contented with the streaming option. No commercials interruptions (though our router sabotages the stream periodically), most titles are in their proper aspect ratio and there are some titles that haven't been released on disc at all.

I agree it makes no sense to rely exclusively on digital streams or downloads for one's library, but I also think that refusing to enter the digital world on principle is an act of short-sighted pettiness.
Old 10-04-10, 12:31 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by dvdjunkie32 View Post
What will you do when they stop making dvd players, and your player bites the dust?
This is a concept I don't understand...they are still making turntables !!!!!!!!

Jeez you can still play vinyl from the 40's and 50's all of a sudden you won't be able to buy a player to play DVDs or Blu Rays ??????


In fact a few years ago I almost bought a 1915 Victor Victrola.
Old 10-04-10, 12:54 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by Drake View Post
This is a concept I don't understand...they are still making turntables !!!!!!!!

Jeez you can still play vinyl from the 40's and 50's all of a sudden you won't be able to buy a player to play DVDs or Blu Rays ??????


In fact a few years ago I almost bought a 1915 Victor Victrola.
Actually, this inadvertently brings up an interesting point. Consider all the music that was released on vinyl or cassette that has never seen the light of day on CD. There are a lot of Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings albums that have only ever existed on vinyl, and if I want to hear them, that's the format I have to use.

But to think that retaining these physical formats somehow means that streaming or downloading don't have a role to play in one's entertainment library is a non sequitar. When I wanted to hear the single remix of Norah Jones's "Chasing Pirates," I had to download it digitally because there was no physical counterpart. Is it ideal? Maybe not. But why should I not have access to the material that interests me because of the format on which it exists?
Old 10-04-10, 01:20 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by dvdjunkie32 View Post
What will you do when they stop making dvd players, and your player bites the dust?
I have four working DVD players in my apartment (3 of them code-free) and three working VCRs. Plus two new/unused SONY DVD/VCR combos packed away in my basement storage unit. Plus an unused 13-inch TV/VCR combo in the basement also. All for back-up when my current machines break down. I plan to buy another code-free DVD player soon for further back-up. I'd like to have more--just for that day when it will be impossible to buy another player.

Last edited by Ash Ketchum; 10-04-10 at 01:31 PM.
Old 10-04-10, 01:28 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by MinLShaw View Post
I can appreciate these arguments, but for the price of a pair of $5 blind buys I can stream unlimited content from Netflix, maximizing my exposure to features I would ordinarily not see. For instance, last month I partook in the Criterion Challenge despite only actually owning two Criterion DVDs. Those things aren't cheap, and rarely turn up used around here. Thanks to Netflix, I was able to stream more than 20 Criterion titles for much less than it would have cost to have bought one--even during Barnes & Noble's famed 50% off sale in August.

If you've got the money to justify outright buying any title you think you may ever want to see, then more power to ya. Our entertainment budget has diminished dramatically, and while there are still some occasional titles I or my wife will really want to own on Blu-ray or DVD, we've found ourselves rather contented with the streaming option. No commercials interruptions (though our router sabotages the stream periodically), most titles are in their proper aspect ratio and there are some titles that haven't been released on disc at all.

I agree it makes no sense to rely exclusively on digital streams or downloads for one's library, but I also think that refusing to enter the digital world on principle is an act of short-sighted pettiness.
What you say makes perfect sense. I have enough tapes and DVDs to last me the rest of my life and I keep making vows not to buy anymore. But there are always new things I feel I need to see that I'm not going to want to buy but that I really ought to see--for one reason or another. I hate to rent, so streaming might be a suitable option for me. At some point, after I get a new computer capable of streaming (to replace my current 11-year-old home model), I'll probably have to explore that option.
Old 10-04-10, 01:28 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum View Post
I have four working DVD players in my apartment (3 of them code-free) and three working VCRs. Plus two new/unused SONY DVD/VCR combos packed away in my basement storage unit. Plus an unused 13-inch TV/VCR combo in the basement also. All for back-up. I plan to buy another code-free DVD player soon for further back-up. I'd like to have more--just in case.
How much Tang did you drink in your basement on 12/31/1999? I kid, I kid.
Old 10-04-10, 01:58 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum View Post
What you say makes perfect sense. I have enough tapes and DVDs to last me the rest of my life and I keep making vows not to buy anymore. But there are always new things I feel I need to see that I'm not going to want to buy but that I really ought to see--for one reason or another. I hate to rent, so streaming might be a suitable option for me. At some point, after I get a new computer capable of streaming (to replace my current 11-year-old home model), I'll probably have to explore that option.
It's entirely up to you, but as long as you've got a wireless router, you don't even need a newer PC. For $99, the new AppleTV unit will stream content from Netflix. And if you're so inclined, you can also rent or buy digital content from iTunes to view through the AppleTV unit, as well, and a lot of it is now available in HD. I've practically filled a 320 GB hard drive just with free video content from iTunes; they're constantly offering pilot episodes of new shows, and the occasional documentary film. I don't have an AppleTV unit, but if I did, I'd be thrilled to watch this content in HD on my TV.
Old 10-04-10, 02:14 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by kd5 View Post
The concept of streaming media to my computer (or any other device) doesn't appeal to me in the slightest. I purchase the movies I like on physical media, I pay for them once, I can watch them whenever I want, however many times I want to, forever. I like having my DVD collection, it's something I can look at, be proud of, I can peruse and choose any movie I want to, anytime I want, I OWN it. I can do with it anything I want to do with it, any time I want to do it. I can show it off to friends or family, I can check out the special features if I want to, watch "making of's", as long as I take care of it I can keep it for as long as I want to and watch it as many times as I want to. Owning the physical media puts a smile on my face, I'd rather own the movie than rent it (or stream it) any day of the week. -kd5-
There are a lot of guys who LOVE their record collection but ever since the mass public moved on in the late 1980s to the next technology, those record collectors had a tough time finding anything new.

Even today with the mild resurgence of LP records, you're still paying $25-$30 a piece because the volume of sales isn't very high.

I don't feel the mass public really feels the need to "show-off" their DVD collection. Since they're so de-valued now, there really isn't any glory in it when everyone else has access to more titles on a little hard drive or access to it via Netflix.

For most people collecting is becoming obsolete. There is so much content out there competing for our attention that there is little reason to own anymore.

Personally I like owning the DVD because I like the extras and the package artwork, but I'm in the minority. I have several friends who tossed out the DVD cases and just kept the disc because they have no attachment to the "product", just the content they watch.
Old 10-04-10, 02:26 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by MinLShaw View Post
It's entirely up to you, but as long as you've got a wireless router, you don't even need a newer PC. For $99, the new AppleTV unit will stream content from Netflix. And if you're so inclined, you can also rent or buy digital content from iTunes to view through the AppleTV unit, as well, and a lot of it is now available in HD. I've practically filled a 320 GB hard drive just with free video content from iTunes; they're constantly offering pilot episodes of new shows, and the occasional documentary film. I don't have an AppleTV unit, but if I did, I'd be thrilled to watch this content in HD on my TV.
No, my household isn't nearly that high-tech. (You should have guessed that from the "11-year-old computer" and the "3 working VCRs.") I don't have a wireless router (I don't even know what that IS). And I don't have an AppleTV unit (I don't know what that is either).
Old 10-04-10, 02:39 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by orangerunner View Post
I don't feel the mass public really feels the need to "show-off" their DVD collection. Since they're so de-valued now, there really isn't any glory in it when everyone else has access to more titles on a little hard drive or access to it via Netflix.
This is definitely a YMMV thing. My friends pay little regard to our library, but on the rare occurrence when someone sees our shelves for the first time it almost always elicits some fascination and awe. (And our library is but a fraction of most of the ones touted by other DVD Talkers!) I think it really comes down to 1) how your library is presented and 2) whether the person seeing it cares about movies enough to be impressed, or to at least be able to comprehend the effort, time and money you've put into it.

For most people collecting is becoming obsolete. There is so much content out there competing for our attention that there is little reason to own anymore.
Source? I hate to be this way, but that strikes me as mere generalization. I would caution against citing the dwindling stock of merchandise in brick & mortar stores as evidence of a declining trend in ownership, as more consumers have begun turning to online sales for their wants and needs. You might not see Criterion discs flying off the local shelves, but that doesn't mean that your neighbors aren't buying them.

Personally I like owning the DVD because I like the extras and the package artwork, but I'm in the minority. I have several friends who tossed out the DVD cases and just kept the disc because they have no attachment to the "product", just the content they watch.
I've known some people who would readily toss out their cassette or CD cases and inserts, and throw the media itself into a box or a binder, but not enough that I consider them the majority by a long shot. For 20 years, my family owned and operated a consignment business and rarely did anyone bring us media without its corresponding packaging. Granted, we had to reject about half of the discs that were brought to us because they were scuffed all to hell, but they did have the packaging and inserts. The average person may not be as fastidious about such things as you or I, but he isn't the destructive heathen you seem to believe he is, either.
Old 10-04-10, 02:40 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

I agree with some of you, I don't want to replace my physical media collection. I spent tons of money and time gathering and enjoying my collection.

There are folks that collect salt shakers and spoons from all over in all shapes and sizes. If it's special to them, so be it. I don't see the reason why it should be of any less value to them just because you can go down to Sam's and pick up a 5 gallon jug of salt and a crate of plastic spoons for 72 cents.
Old 10-04-10, 03:00 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by MinLShaw View Post
I can appreciate these arguments, but for the price of a pair of $5 blind buys I can stream unlimited content from Netflix, maximizing my exposure to features I would ordinarily not see. For instance, last month I partook in the Criterion Challenge despite only actually owning two Criterion DVDs. Those things aren't cheap, and rarely turn up used around here. Thanks to Netflix, I was able to stream more than 20 Criterion titles for much less than it would have cost to have bought one--even during Barnes & Noble's famed 50% off sale in August.

If you've got the money to justify outright buying any title you think you may ever want to see, then more power to ya. Our entertainment budget has diminished dramatically, and while there are still some occasional titles I or my wife will really want to own on Blu-ray or DVD, we've found ourselves rather contented with the streaming option. No commercials interruptions (though our router sabotages the stream periodically), most titles are in their proper aspect ratio and there are some titles that haven't been released on disc at all.

I agree it makes no sense to rely exclusively on digital streams or downloads for one's library, but I also think that refusing to enter the digital world on principle is an act of short-sighted pettiness.

In answer to your first paragraph, I have absolutely no desire to stream movies to my computer or any other portable device. I have a 53" WS HDTV I watch my movies and TV series on, with my wife, sitting hand in hand on a comfortable sofa. I have no want or need to watch a 2 hr. movie sitting at my computer or on a little 1" to 3" screen. Also, that you participated in the Criterion Challege was commendable, but it was a personal choice to participate that you made, and that I did not. Nothing more, nothing less.

In answer to your second paragraph, my entertainment budget is limited as well, I purchase DVDs I want for normally well under $10, sometimes for $5 or less. I don't have an insatiable appetite to own the latest and greatest movies as soon as they're released, I have plenty of movies I can watch until I can pick them up at a reasonable price if I choose to pick them up at all. I have most of the DVDs I've wanted, I'll gather the remainder as time, money, and desire permits.

In answer to your third paragraph, contrary to what you may think, entering the digital world with streaming media downloads does NOT make you a superior human being, nor does it give you the right to insult me because I don't share your view. -kd5-
Old 10-04-10, 03:27 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

Originally Posted by kd5 View Post
In answer to your first paragraph, I have absolutely no desire to stream movies to my computer or any other portable device. I have a 53" WS HDTV I watch my movies and TV series on, with my wife, sitting hand in hand on a comfortable sofa. I have no want or need to watch a 2 hr. movie sitting at my computer or on a little 1" to 3" screen. Also, that you participated in the Criterion Challege was commendable, but it was a personal choice to participate that you made, and that I did not. Nothing more, nothing less.
There's no reason you have to restrict yourself to a lesser screen. My wife's laptop connects easily to our HDTV. So does our Wii, through which we stream the aforementioned Netflix content. I don't know why so many people thing that digital content can "only" be viewed on handheld devices, but it's a misconception.

As for the Criterion Challenge, I don't think it's "commendable" in the least. I merely mentioned it to illustrate how the streaming options really opened up an avenue that would otherwise have been much more severely closed off to me. I suspect that, regardless of the theme or genre, streaming content can offer a lot more viewing options than relying on discs exclusively.

In answer to your third paragraph, contrary to what you may think, entering the digital world with streaming media downloads does NOT make you a superior human being, nor does it give you the right to insult me because I don't share your view. -kd5-
Easy, hoss! I never intended to claim any kind of superiority or to insult you or anyone else. If that's how you took any of my remarks, I sincerely apologize because it never crossed my mind that any of what I typed might be construed that way. I've just been trying to explore the topic of what role streaming rentals can play in one's library.

I just don't understand refusing to use a given format on principle. Cost, I could understand. Many have said they won't go to Blu-ray because they can't justify buying an HDTV or 7.1 surround sound system to really make full use of the format.

For me, it's an affordable way to maximize my exposure to content I might otherwise have missed. I can stream several movies in the time it takes to receive, watch and return a disc from Netflix, and for the price of a pair of $5.00 Walmart bin blind buys. If that scheme makes sense to you, great. If not, that's fine, too; you don't need my approval any more than I need yours.
Old 10-04-10, 03:47 PM
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Re: DVDs, Materialism, & the Concept of Ownership

I've dabbled in Netflix instant, but as of yet I'm unwilling to pay for internet that's capable of giving me the quality I'd be happy with. Renting discs through Netflix/BB is still a no-brainer though because video stores are dead in my area. I don't even have a Redbox machine closer than ~11mi (the crap selection doesn't even make it worth renting from them more than once every 2-3 months anyways).

So, as silly as it may seem, a big priority of whether I should buy a physical copy of a title is (other than actually liking it): If I feel a need to support the distributor/studio.

By this I mean that there are companies out there that I try to support as they generally bust their butts, on limited budgets, to release on dvd/blu-ray all kinds of films I enjoy (Criterion, MoC, plus some other small labels). Then a close second is catalog titles of classics from bigger studios/distributors. So I try to make sure my movie money (mostly) goes towards these niche companies.

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