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Component Input?

Old 11-12-01, 12:23 PM
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Component Input?

Hey guys and girls...

I've been searching the net and these groups to find out exactly WHAT a component input is and haven't had very much luck. Please don't flame for asking such a simple question. Any care to extoll the value of a component hookup and what the purpose is? Looking for some information here.
digitalfreaknyc is offline  
Old 11-12-01, 12:51 PM
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Basically:

The video cable (the yellow one) carries the video signal.

S-Video splits the "components" of the video signal into three parts although the cable is still one piece

Component Video splits the video into three parts Red, Blue and Green each on a seperate cable.

Progressive DVD players sending a progressive signal use component video to pass the signal.

If your TV cannot accept component video, don't worry about it.


http://www.cnet.com/electronics/0-63...7008129-1.html
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Old 11-12-01, 12:52 PM
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I'm sure there are some websites that have test charts, etc. on Componet Input comparisions compared to S-Video & Composite RCA Inputs but I'm too lazy to search for them. The biggest deal about them is you have to use these connections for any resolution 480p or higher.
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Old 11-12-01, 01:13 PM
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Originally posted by Brian Shannon
Basically:

The video cable (the yellow one) carries the video signal.

S-Video splits the "components" of the video signal into three parts although the cable is still one piece

Component Video splits the video into three parts Red, Blue and Green each on a seperate cable.

Progressive DVD players sending a progressive signal use component video to pass the signal.

If your TV cannot accept component video, don't worry about it.


http://www.cnet.com/electronics/0-63...7008129-1.html

Straight from the (very helpful) cnet link:

Component video improves the picture quality even more by not only separating the color from the black-and-white portions of the picture but by further splitting the color information into two color-difference signals.
Not exactly how you explained it above.
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Old 11-12-01, 01:18 PM
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Originally posted by Brian Shannon

S-Video splits the "components" of the video signal into three parts although the cable is still one piece

Component Video splits the video into three parts Red, Blue and Green each on a seperate cable.
Not quite but close.

S-Video keeps the chrominance (C, color) and luminance (Y, brightness) separate.

What you are refering is an RGB signal. Component video takes S-Video one step further by separating the chrominance into two signals (Y/B and Y/R, or Pb and Pr) while keeping the separate Y signal.
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