Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > Entertainment Discussions > TV Talk
Reload this Page >

Writers Strike 2023

TV Talk Talk about Shows on TV

Writers Strike 2023

Old 08-17-23, 09:37 AM
  #776  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Formerly known as "GizmoDVD"/Southern CA
Posts: 31,779
Received 101 Likes on 87 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Jay G.
Nobody is saying that the residuals alone should provide a living wage. But why are people perfectly fine with movie and TV shows profiting off a work for 95 years until the copyright expires, but not fine with the writers, cast, etc. getting just a small part of that revenue? Like, as long as streamers are still charging for access to the work and/or showing ads with it, and the studios are making money off it, it makes sense for at least writers and actors to get some of that money too.
The studio took the risk and put the money up to make that movie or show exist, not the writer or cast. Why shouldn’t the studio profit off its risk it took? Maybe the writers and cast should give back some of their pay if a show does poorly? Seems fair, right? (We know it’s a big No from Jay)
Old 08-17-23, 09:40 AM
  #777  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 44,104
Received 1,915 Likes on 1,481 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Gizmo
The studio took the risk and put the money up to make that movie or show exist, not the writer or cast. Why shouldn’t the studio profit off its risk it took? Maybe the writers and cast should give back some of their pay if a show does poorly? Seems fair, right? (We know it’s a big No from Jay)
Isn't that kind of how residuals work? They get less if the show does poorly?
Old 08-17-23, 10:09 AM
  #778  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Rob V's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: On the lake
Posts: 12,675
Received 376 Likes on 303 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by fujishig
Isn't that kind of how residuals work? They get less if the show does poorly?
But to Gizmo's point, they already got paid once for the job they did. If 10 writers are in a room, is everyone of them due the same residual amount? What if a writer didn't have any of their ideas used? Allowing anybody who has ever worked on anything to get paid forever is a pretty silly premise. I know highly successful actors use back-end residuals to fatten up their wallets -- but it's not scalable in the real world where it takes MANY moving pieces to make that single actor so successful. I know this is a writer's strike and I don't know how far down the rabbit hole this strike goes; but imagine if the sound editors asked for residuals too. I could argue many of them are more valuable than a lot of writers.
Old 08-17-23, 10:13 AM
  #779  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 43,311
Received 1,635 Likes on 1,024 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Gizmo
Id prefer $1000 a day for 8 weeks instead. Thank you.

can I have 10 months off and the same pay? Please.
I dunno, are you a good enough writer to get that kind of gig? Or do you just not like it when people have different jobs and therefore different opportunities than you? If this whole thing is just that you are jealous of writers, that would make a lot more sense than your current "corporations deserve all the money" stance.

I'll use an example from my own career - I used to be a daytime talk show TV producer. I was a journalism major, spent time as a news photographer and then a corporate video producer which lead me to working almost 15 years a talk show producer, spending the last 2 1/2 years as the Executive Producer and manager of the show and its staff. We had someone else on staff who was a general office worker. They had come from working as a receptionist in a completely different field and was just hired to do the same kind of office work for the TV show. This person was continuously jealous and upset about the opportunities that we, as producers, received for our jobs. If there was a new restaurant opening in town, the producers might get an invitation to the grand opening. The office person sometimes did too, actually, but not as often. Because the restaurant wants the publicity that the producers could provide. It's completely transactional. And while I was a lot nicer about it when I had to address it, the bottom line is that if this person wanted the perks, then they could have done the things I did to get to the position I was in.

Here's another one. When I was deciding what I wanted to do with my career, I chose stability and to start a family relatively young. I have a friend at my first TV job (same age as me) who moved to California, slept on people's couches and scrapped her way into the TV business, ultimately working for shows like Scrubs and LOST (living on location for years in Hawaii). Was I a little jealous of what she accomplished? Absolutely. But I also knew that I wouldn't have been able to handle the uncertainty and unstable aspects of that life to get to that point. So I made my decisions and I don't begrudge her for a second for all of the incredible opportunities she has received because she put in the work.

Originally Posted by Rob V
But to Gizmo's point, they already got paid once for the job they did. If 10 writers are in a room, is everyone of them due the same residual amount? What if a writer didn't have any of their ideas used? Allowing anybody who has ever worked on anything to get paid forever is a pretty silly premise. I know highly successful actors use back-end residuals to fatten up their wallets -- but it's not scalable in the real world where it takes MANY moving pieces to make that single actor so successful. I know this is a writer's strike and I don't know how far down the rabbit hole this strike goes; but imagine if the sound editors asked for residuals too. I could argue many of them are more valuable than a lot of writers.
That gets back to how these roles are valued. And that's true in any business.

When I was in college, I worked at a video store and one of my roommates worked at a pizza delivery place. I got minimum wage, and he got minimum wage plus mileage plus tips. And he certainly didn't work harder than I did. When I was a news photographer, I found out that the photogs were the lowest paid people in the TV newsroom, when we were the one position you HAD to have to make TV. If the photogs don't shoot any video, there is nothing for the anchors to read over, the directors to call, the sound people to punch in, etc. But the industry just isn't built that way.

If we want to talk about people getting paid what they are truly worth, then we're going to have to start talking about teachers, elected officials, CEOs and every other job in this country.



Last edited by Draven; 08-17-23 at 10:23 AM.
The following users liked this post:
Jay G. (08-17-23)
Old 08-17-23, 10:44 AM
  #780  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 44,104
Received 1,915 Likes on 1,481 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Rob V
But to Gizmo's point, they already got paid once for the job they did. If 10 writers are in a room, is everyone of them due the same residual amount? What if a writer didn't have any of their ideas used? Allowing anybody who has ever worked on anything to get paid forever is a pretty silly premise. I know highly successful actors use back-end residuals to fatten up their wallets -- but it's not scalable in the real world where it takes MANY moving pieces to make that single actor so successful. I know this is a writer's strike and I don't know how far down the rabbit hole this strike goes; but imagine if the sound editors asked for residuals too. I could argue many of them are more valuable than a lot of writers.
Presumably they would have been paid more up front without residuals. Residuals are baked into their contract. If it was a terrible deal for the studios then this would have been revamped long ago, so my uneducated guess is that this was working out fine for the studios but streaming provided them an opportunity to make even more money by legally cutting back on what residuals they paid out.
Old 08-17-23, 10:58 AM
  #781  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,681
Received 646 Likes on 446 Posts
Originally Posted by Gizmo
Id prefer $1000 a day for 8 weeks instead. Thank you.

can I have 10 months off and the same pay? Please.
$40,000 annual salary isn't survivable in LA.

https://ktla.com/news/california/thi...in-california/
The 50/30/20 budgeting method separates one’s budget into three categories: basic living expenses, discretionary spending, and saving or paying off debt.

The budgeting method calls for 50% of the salary to be used to pay for basic living expenses, for example, rent and bills; 30% would be used for personal spending and 20% would be put into a savings account or used to pay down debt.

The data used in the study analyzed the cost of living in each city as of 2022.

For California cities like Los Angeles, Berkeley and San Diego, a single person must make more than $76,000 to “live comfortably,” the data shows.
https://www.movingwaldo.com/moving-t...g-los-angeles/
The average cost of living in Los Angeles is $3,886 per month.
https://livingcost.org/cost/united-s...ca/los-angeles
The average cost of living in Los Angeles is $3145, which is in the top 0.5% of the most expensive cities in the world, ranked 45th out of 9294 in our global list, 35th out of 2202 in the United States, and 26th out of 319 in California.
You'd stave/be homeless only earning $40,000 a year in LA.





Originally Posted by Rob V
But to Gizmo's point, they already got paid once for the job they did. If 10 writers are in a room, is everyone of them due the same residual amount?
Residuals are paid on a per-episode basis, based on the credited writers for that episode.

https://www.wga.org/members/finances...survival-guide
The credited writer(s) on a produced project receive(s) the residual compensation. Regardless of how much you are paid or what you contribute to the final shooting script on a project, you only receive MBA residuals if you receive writing credit.
If you want to argue against residuals, you should maybe read up about them and how they work, instead of complaining about an issue that doesn't actually exist.

Originally Posted by Rob V
I know highly successful actors use back-end residuals to fatten up their wallets...
"Highly Successful Actors" don't rely on guild-rate residuals, they're going to have their own revenue-sharing deals.

However, residuals can help sustain an actor until the point where they become highly successful. There's very few overnight successes in Hollywood.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainmen...s-cant-give-in
Before her Oscar, Jessica Chastain lived off residuals: 'I just know the actors can't give in'

....“I just know the actors can’t give in,” Chastain says. “They just can’t. If they do – especially what I’ve read about background artists – then they’re really writing themselves out of the industry in the future.”

It wasn’t all that long ago, Chastain remembers, that she was driving around Los Angeles in her beat-up Honda Civic, reading for every role she could find and living off the residuals she’d get from doing TV pilots or a guest spot on Law & Order.

“I don’t know what I’d have done without that residual money,” she says....
Originally Posted by Gizmo
The studio took the risk and put the money up to make that movie or show exist, not the writer or cast. Why shouldn’t the studio profit off its risk it took?
The writers and cast take a risk on every movie and show as well, since they're taking that job over other possible ones, having to turn down other job opportunities because of scheduling conflicts, etc. They also take a risk by taking less upfront pay in exchange for residuals down the line. They also sometimes have to move away from friends and family for weeks to months to years at a time to do the job (such as a British actor working on multiple seasons of a US show), so it's not without sacrifice.

Studios deserve to earn money on a show, but they're not the only ones, and arguably give the least contribution in terms of how well the final product turns out. Why are you begrudging writers and actors simply wanting a bigger piece of the pie, especially when it's still relatively a sliver of a slice?


Last edited by Adam Tyner; 08-18-23 at 04:30 PM. Reason: Merging a few consecutive posts
Old 08-17-23, 12:35 PM
  #782  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 43,311
Received 1,635 Likes on 1,024 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Boy, that pie chart should be the end of the discussion but I am sure it won't be.
Old 08-17-23, 02:29 PM
  #783  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Rob V's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: On the lake
Posts: 12,675
Received 376 Likes on 303 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

I'm 99.97% sure that pie chart is created with data to make it look like something it's not.
The following users liked this post:
Gizmo (08-17-23)
Old 08-17-23, 02:36 PM
  #784  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Rob V's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: On the lake
Posts: 12,675
Received 376 Likes on 303 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

I wonder how you all would feel if the United Auto Workers (UAW which is prominent here in Detroit) would feel if the line workers got $2 every time a car was sold... and then sold again and again and again. It's the same thing. You were paid up front to do a job and your transaction is now complete. Because a Studio or Streaming Service or Network took a chance on you is the important thing. No company is going to let the most important cog in the machine go... but an upcoming writer or an average writer - like everybody else - either keeps plugging away until they earn their status or they find another gig.

Personally, I want the working man to get the money. I am a firm believer that a strong middle class is waaaaaay more important that a few rich guys and corporate execs getting multi-million dollar bonuses and tax breaks. That said, I get that not all things are equal and certainly not every person should get money into perpetuity for doing their job. If you want that, you'll need to create your own IP and own the rights, distribution, marketing, financing, etc. Studios take the gamble because they can -- and they reap the rewards.
The following users liked this post:
Gizmo (08-17-23)
Old 08-17-23, 02:53 PM
  #785  
DVD Talk Godfather & 2020 TOTY Winner
Thread Starter
 
Decker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Vegas, Baby!
Posts: 75,563
Received 6,145 Likes on 4,180 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Producing art isn't the same thing as producing a product. Look at music recording. The artist and the songwriter might get paid for recording the song, maybe paid per album or single sold. But since there are entire businesses built around playing that music in perpetuity, like Radio and Streaming Music services, wouldn't you agree that the songwriter and artist should continue to receive compensation if their work is continuing to generate new revenue? That is a completely different business model to a car which someone owns outright and then can resell to recoup any remaining value in the owned product.
The following users liked this post:
Jay G. (08-17-23)
Old 08-17-23, 03:50 PM
  #786  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 43,311
Received 1,635 Likes on 1,024 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Rob V
I wonder how you all would feel if the United Auto Workers (UAW which is prominent here in Detroit) would feel if the line workers got $2 every time a car was sold... and then sold again and again and again. It's the same thing. You were paid up front to do a job and your transaction is now complete. Because a Studio or Streaming Service or Network took a chance on you is the important thing. No company is going to let the most important cog in the machine go... but an upcoming writer or an average writer - like everybody else - either keeps plugging away until they earn their status or they find another gig.

Personally, I want the working man to get the money. I am a firm believer that a strong middle class is waaaaaay more important that a few rich guys and corporate execs getting multi-million dollar bonuses and tax breaks. That said, I get that not all things are equal and certainly not every person should get money into perpetuity for doing their job. If you want that, you'll need to create your own IP and own the rights, distribution, marketing, financing, etc. Studios take the gamble because they can -- and they reap the rewards.
If you think that line workers deserve profit sharing...then I agree with you. As would many people. But of course companies aren't going to do that. To quote "Office Space": It's a problem of motivation, all right? Now if I work my ass off and Initech ships a few extra units, I don't see another dime, so where's the motivation?

But I'll go back to my earlier example - who should get the most money for the sale of a book, the writer or the publisher? That's the simplest distillation of this fight.
The following users liked this post:
majorjoe23 (08-18-23)
Old 08-17-23, 03:56 PM
  #787  
DVD Talk Godfather & 2020 TOTY Winner
Thread Starter
 
Decker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Vegas, Baby!
Posts: 75,563
Received 6,145 Likes on 4,180 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

I don't even think your question of "Who deserves more" is the right question to ask. The publisher, and the studio, absorbs all the risk of failure, so I have no problem with them realizing the lions share of the reward for success. That said, the writer is certainly entitled to a fair share of revenue. And while the writer might have recieved a nice check for writing their book, I think they would still deserve some share of the continued income going forward. However much Harper Lee saw when she sold To Kill a Mockingbird, her estate should still be seeing dividends because that book sells lots of copies every single year.
Old 08-17-23, 03:56 PM
  #788  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Formerly known as "GizmoDVD"/Southern CA
Posts: 31,779
Received 101 Likes on 87 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Jay G.
$40,000 annual salary isn't survivable in LA.

https://ktla.com/news/california/thi...in-california/


https://www.movingwaldo.com/moving-t...g-los-angeles/


https://livingcost.org/cost/united-s...ca/los-angeles


You'd stave/be homeless only earning $40,000 a year in LA.
So they need to find something else since their gig job is just a gig job. Amazing how that works out when you are not a great writer and no one wants you on their show. In any other industry they would just leave and find something else. But not being a writer, apparently.
Old 08-17-23, 04:45 PM
  #789  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 43,311
Received 1,635 Likes on 1,024 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Gizmo
So they need to find something else since their gig job is just a gig job. Amazing how that works out when you are not a great writer and no one wants you on their show. In any other industry they would just leave and find something else. But not being a writer, apparently.
They do go and find other jobs. Do you know how much the average member of the union makes a year? It's been said dozens of times but you still seem to think they are millionaires.
The following users liked this post:
Jay G. (08-17-23)
Old 08-17-23, 05:10 PM
  #790  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Formerly known as "GizmoDVD"/Southern CA
Posts: 31,779
Received 101 Likes on 87 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

https://deadline.com/2023/08/writers...ix-1235521671/

The anti-competitive union is trying to get the Government involved in what they deem to be anti-competitive. Meanwhile the WGA has told TikTokers, YouTuber and anyone else they won’t be allowed in the WGA in the future if they “scab”.

WGA has been handling this terrible. How have they not tossed leadership yet?
Old 08-17-23, 05:43 PM
  #791  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Twin Cities, US of A
Posts: 14,169
Received 171 Likes on 136 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Gizmo
https://deadline.com/2023/08/writers...ix-1235521671/

The anti-competitive union is trying to get the Government involved in what they deem to be anti-competitive. Meanwhile the WGA has told TikTokers, YouTuber and anyone else they won’t be allowed in the WGA in the future if they “scab”.

WGA has been handling this terrible. How have they not tossed leadership yet?
Only a truly benevolent organization operating from a position of strength is compelled to make membership (and accompanying payments to them) compulsory and issues tyrannical threats to those who defy them.
Old 08-17-23, 06:03 PM
  #792  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,681
Received 646 Likes on 446 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Bill Needle
Only a truly benevolent organization operating from a position of strength is compelled to make membership (and accompanying payments to them) compulsory and issues tyrannical threats to those who defy them.
Unions only work if the workers are, you know, united. They only ever form if a majority of workers vote to have one, and all their actions are predicated on votes from the members. It's a democracy. "Right to work" is a scam industrialists use as a wedge to try and break unions, so they can better exploit their workers.
The following users liked this post:
spainlinx0 (08-17-23)
Old 08-17-23, 06:20 PM
  #793  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,681
Received 646 Likes on 446 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Rob V
I wonder how you all would feel if the United Auto Workers (UAW which is prominent here in Detroit) would feel if the line workers got $2 every time a car was sold... and then sold again and again and again. It's the same thing.
It's literally not. The line workers didn't design the car, merely produced a copy of it. Something analogous for movies/TV would be a person working on a DVD/Blu-ray disc production line. And for both line workers, they get paid for the amount of work it makes to produce a copy, which isn't all that much. But for car designs, car manufacturers pour millions to billions of dollars into R&D and such, and Ford would be in dire straights if they designed a new car model, and every other car manufacturer was free to just take the design for no cost and start producing their own copies.

Also, nobody gets paid for the same copy being sold a second time. Not car manufacturers, not studios, not writers or actors. They're asking to be paid for each copy made, or at least the revenue from the initial sales of that copy, or for each broadcast (effectively a new copy) or each stream (again, effectively a new copy). If the copy is permanent, like a DVD, they're not asking for money when it's resold.

Originally Posted by Rob V
You were paid up front to do a job and your transaction is now complete.
Well then actors and writers would have to ask for much more money upfront then, and studios will take a bigger bath on projects that don't perform well, as well as not being able to produce as much at one time since they have to pay for everything as a single, upfront fee, instead of defraying costs across the marketable lifespan of the product.

Originally Posted by Rob V
That said, I get that not all things are equal and certainly not every person should get money into perpetuity for doing their job. If you want that, you'll need to create your own IP and own the rights, distribution, marketing, financing, etc. Studios take the gamble because they can -- and they reap the rewards.
This is a very capitalist viewpoint, in the sense that you give extraordinary weight and power to the person with the capital. It's a massive power imbalance that only means the rich get richer, and gives them justification to exploit their workforce, which is plentiful but lacking in capital. It leads to a new aristocracy, where the wealthy get wealthier because they have the money to spare to spend on people to create new works. Why should people gambling with money make money for decades on something other people worked hard at making, while the people most responsible for the work, the writers, actors, etc. have to settle for merely an upfront payment? Also, do you think that will actually produce better works? Writers, actors, musicians, etc. all quitting shortly after starting and having to find a different job, because they can't support themselves, and then the industries just throwing new, inexperienced creatives into the meat grinder?

Like, when a new TV show or movie is announced, do you ignore the writer, director, actor, etc. and just look for what studio is making it? "Oh, a Universal film! That'll be good!" For me, the studio name is almost meaningless. What matters is the actual talent. And sure, the studios should get a return on their monetary investment, but not to the detriment of everyone that worked on it.
Old 08-17-23, 06:27 PM
  #794  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Formerly known as "GizmoDVD"/Southern CA
Posts: 31,779
Received 101 Likes on 87 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Jay G.
Unions only work if the workers are, you know, united. They only ever form if a majority of workers vote to have one, and all their actions are predicated on votes from the members. It's a democracy. "Right to work" is a scam industrialists use as a wedge to try and break unions, so they can better exploit their workers.
I'd love to write for THE ROOKIE, can I do so without joining the WGA? It's pretty anti-competitive I can't write for the majority of scripted TV unless I join a Union and pay them money to do whatever they do (which currently is keeping writers out of work for 4 months and hundreds of thousands of others for much, much longer).

WGA is going to lose control pretty quickly if they don't get things resolved, and doing what they are currently doing isn't helping.
Old 08-17-23, 06:29 PM
  #795  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,681
Received 646 Likes on 446 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Gizmo
So they need to find something else since their gig job is just a gig job.
You realize you're basically arguing that nobody should write, act, direct anything, because you don't want it to be a sustainable career, right? Like, you either don't want movies and TV shows to exist, or you want to punish those that make movies and TV shows by denying them the money that's readily available and only a small percentage of the amount generated from the work they do. Like, I'd understand if their demands were unreasonable due to movies and TV shows not making that much money, but it's a $275 billion a year industry, and growing. The studios rake in so much money, over decades, for the work produced, and the writers and actors are merely asking for amounts that mean they can continue to afford to live and work in the industry, have health insurance, and maybe be able to retire at some point.
Old 08-17-23, 06:34 PM
  #796  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,681
Received 646 Likes on 446 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Gizmo
I'd love to write for THE ROOKIE, can I do so without joining the WGA? It's pretty anti-competitive I can't write for the majority of scripted TV unless I join a Union....
That's not how it works. You actually have to do get hired first before the WGA will let you join. So you actually have to convince the studios to hire you, not the WGA.

https://www.reddit.com/r/Screenwriti...to_membership/
There appears to be this misconception floating around (perhaps intentionally) that, in order to get hired to write for TV/film, you have to be a WGA member and it’s all this impossibly complicated catch 22.

THAT IS FALSE.

In contrast other union processes, writers become eligible/must-joins for WGA membership AFTER they’ve been hired to write for signatories.

There’s a points system. Selling one screenplay or being staffed for 12 weeks are two straight-forward ways to garner enough credits, but there are a number of ways to earn the units, further laid out here:

https://www.wga.org/the-guild/going-...join-the-guild

I personally know writers assistants and script coordinators who earned membership by being assigned enough scripts over the course of their support staff careers.

While there are some cool groups, programs, and events, the true value in WGA membership comes when you are WORKING. There are protections, minimum pay, healthcare, and other standards guaranteed in the minimum basic agreement that ensure current and incoming members are compensated fairly by signatories.

Those are the protections we are fighting for today. So when the WGA says that this fight is also for future members, they mean it. They truly want more people to qualify for the guild; it ensures the longevity of the profession, makes the WGA stronger, and keeps the pension funded.

All this is to say that, if a showrunner or studio exec really likes your script, there is no union barrier in hiring you. They can conduct their business as they please - in accordance with the MBA (yes, you get WGA pay before even joining) - and the guild will come calling once you’ve earned the appropriate number of credits.

Joining the WGA should not be the goal, WORK should be the goal.
You keep being wrong about everything. Keep that streak going.
The following 2 users liked this post by Jay G.:
DJariya (08-17-23), majorjoe23 (08-18-23)
Old 08-17-23, 08:00 PM
  #797  
DVD Talk God
 
DJariya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: La Palma, CA
Posts: 78,867
Received 3,617 Likes on 2,596 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by Gizmo
I'd love to write for THE ROOKIE, can I do so without joining the WGA? It's pretty anti-competitive I can't write for the majority of scripted TV unless I join a Union and pay them money to do whatever they do (which currently is keeping writers out of work for 4 months and hundreds of thousands of others for much, much longer).

WGA is going to lose control pretty quickly if they don't get things resolved, and doing what they are currently doing isn't helping.
It literally does not work like that. You can't just send Alexi Hawley a blind resume and writing samples and hopes he hires you. You literally have to start from the bottom as a PA and maybe get lucky and be given a chance as a Assistant to a writer to start out. But you should know that you'll likely need a connection to get in on a show as a lowly PA. They don't advertise these kind of jobs.
Old 08-17-23, 10:02 PM
  #798  
DVD Talk Legend
 
spainlinx0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: NJ
Posts: 18,676
Received 487 Likes on 286 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

I don't know why we bother talking to these people. There's a fundamental lack of understanding on their part. Propaganda is a hell of a drug. Keep simping for corpos.
The following users liked this post:
majorjoe23 (08-18-23)
Old 08-18-23, 12:06 AM
  #799  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 43,311
Received 1,635 Likes on 1,024 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

And once again, Gizmo fails to understand that the UNION isn’t forcing WRITERS to strike because THE WRITERS ARE THE UNION. It is a union of WRITERS.
The following users liked this post:
Jay G. (08-18-23)
Old 08-18-23, 05:13 AM
  #800  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 8,983
Likes: 0
Received 246 Likes on 175 Posts
Re: Writers Strike 2023

Originally Posted by spainlinx0
I don't know why we bother talking to these people. There's a fundamental lack of understanding on their part. Propaganda is a hell of a drug. Keep simping for corpos.
To be fair, the WGA is using propaganda too. They parade the the 2 cent residual checks and writers making only $25K per year as examples of what they are fighting for, yet nothing they are proposing or asking for will change these people's situations. A 1000% increase in residuals will give them a $2 check. A 10% increase in pay will give them $27.5K per year.
It's the equivalent of using Wal-Mart employees who qualify for food stamps as a reason for increasing the minimum wage, yet if the minimum does increase, these employees will still be broke and getting food stamps. That's propaganda.
WGA is negotiating in bad faith also. They're asking for the ability to solidarity strike. That will never happen. It's unreasonable and prolongs the strike for no reason. No company, of any kind ever agrees to that. In most cases it's illegal in the U.S., and when it is legal the contract will always have language forbidding it.

1. Get the biggest raise you can. Every bit helps.
2. Get everybody covered by health insurance regardless of income
3. Don't allow any A.I. shit
4. No matter how little it is, get the streaming residuals started. Work out the kinks next time
5. Don't agree to more than 3 years. Industry is changing too fast. If I were the union I'd already be working on strategy for next contract in 2026-27 to build upon this one.
6. If presented with "take it or leave it", leave it. If you take it, live with it

Last edited by rw2516; 08-18-23 at 05:26 AM.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.