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Will DVD-R with 960x540 resolution play in DVD-player?

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Will DVD-R with 960x540 resolution play in DVD-player?

Old 01-31-08, 07:28 AM
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Will DVD-R with 960x540 resolution play in DVD-player?

Maximum resolution for DVD-discs is 720x480 pixels (or 720x576 for PAL?). Can a DVD-R burned on a PC to 960x540 pixels be played on a DVD-player?
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Old 01-31-08, 07:44 AM
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Short answer: no.

Long answer: You can't expect to just slap a video file on a DVD-R and expect it to play. In order for a DVD-R to be playable in a DVD player, it has to be "authored" as a DVD-Video disc. DVD-Video has very specific resolutions and framerates it's capable of handling:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-Video#Resolution

Commonly, most DVD burning software will perform simple DVD-Video authoring, and will usually convert videos of different resolutions/framerates/codecs into a form compatible for DVD-Video automatically. So you may be able to convert the video file you have to a DVD-R that's playable on a DVD player, but it won't have a resolution of 960x540 anymore.
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Old 02-01-08, 04:01 AM
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Thanks. How do I choose the right DVD-R disc? My Pioneer DVD player manual says that it may or may not play DVD-R discs, and that it depends on compatibility. But when I read on the boxes of different brands of DVD-R discs there is no information, it just says the same, "check for compatibility".

I just ordered a VAIO laptop. Maybe the SONY brand DVD-R discs will work for the Pioneer DVD player? Or has it nothing to do with the brand of DVD-R disc, but only with the software in the VAIO?

Last edited by Terri; 02-01-08 at 04:03 AM.
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Old 02-01-08, 04:49 AM
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Strangely a few DVD discs seem to have much better resolution than most have. For example I watched a film called "Don't Come Knocking" by Wim Wenders the other night, and the colors were just astounding and the image incredibly sharp and stable.
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Old 02-01-08, 08:01 AM
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Choosing the right brand DVD-R media is a bit of a crap-shoot, as there's no easy way to tell what brand media works with what brand player. Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim often get cited as the best brands for DVD Recordable media, but there's no guarantee that they'll work in your player.

Go to this site and enter your DVD player's model number:
http://www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers
It'll show the types of media that others have tried in this player, and whether or not they have worked.

As for the apparent variable resolution of discs, the link I provided in my previous post points out that DVD-Video does support a variety of resolutions, just not the resolution you asked about. However, the elements you bring up (colors, sharpness, image stability) are not factors of resolution, but of transfer quality. Two different DVDs can have the same resolution but have wildly different picture quality depending on the quality of the original source, the time and care put into the transferring of that source to video, and the time and care put into compressing that source and authoring it on DVD.
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Old 02-01-08, 09:51 AM
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The simplest way to get a burned DVD to play (assuming it has the correct DVD resolution format) is to not use DVD-R. Use DVD+R and set the booktype to DVD-ROM when you burn it. Then it will appear to be a commercial DVD to your player and it almost certainly will play.
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Old 02-02-08, 06:22 AM
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Thanks so much. According to the link above my Pioneer player will handle just about any recordable DVD disc. Except maybe for double layer (DL).
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Old 02-05-08, 04:34 AM
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What are your experiences, will a burned DVD-R (or DVD+R) give as good picture as a professionally made DVD disc?

Last edited by Terri; 02-05-08 at 04:36 AM.
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Old 02-07-08, 01:27 PM
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A "professionally made" DVD like that bought in a store is a pressed disc, not a burned disc. This really only affects playback compatibility, which is why store-bought DVDs will play in any DVD player, while with DVD-/+R discs one has to check player compatibility. However, disc pressing is an expensive process and only feasible when making hundreds to thousands of copies so that the economy of scale makes the price per disc reasonable.

Another difference is that most movies on DVD nowadays use double-layer discs, while most home burning still uses single-layer discs. However, double-layer DVD-/+R discs are available, and may be usable depending on your disc burner. Also, some lower-profile professional discs are pressed on only a single-layer disc, so this difference is neither absolute nor insurmountable.

The only other difference between a "professional" and homemade DVD is the authoring involved. Professional authoring uses professional authoring tools and allows for a lot of supervision and tweaking of the encoding process. With DVD authoring on most home PCs, the software only offers limited authoring and encoding options. However, these options are still fairly good quality, and in most cases the quality difference wouldn't be that noticeable to an end viewer.

The biggest thing that affects the end DVD quality is the quality of the source. A DVD can't improve a crummy source. Also, if the original source is already encoded in a different codec than MPEG2, it will have to be transcoded to MPEG2, which will cause more artifacts and quality issues than if you had started with an uncompressed source.
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Old 02-07-08, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay G.
A "professionally made" DVD like that bought in a store is a pressed disc, not a burned disc. This really only affects playback compatibility, which is why store-bought DVDs will play in any DVD player, while with DVD-/+R discs one has to check player compatibility. However, disc pressing is an expensive process and only feasible when making hundreds to thousands of copies so that the economy of scale makes the price per disc reasonable.
Player compatibility really has nothing to do with whether the disc is pressed or burned, but rather its flagging.

A DVD, pressed or burned, has a flag that tells the player whether it's DVD-ROM, DVD-R, or DVD+R. Early players had never heard of DVD+R so their firmware rejected any disc that wasn't flagged as DVD-ROM (a commercial DVD) or DVD-R. I believe there are even some players that reject anything that isn't flagged as DVD-ROM.

So when you booktype a DVD+R to be flagged as DVD-ROM you are telling the player that it is a DVD-ROM and the disc will be played in any player. DVD-R does not allow booktyping.
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Old 02-07-08, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by X
So when you booktype a DVD+R to be flagged as DVD-ROM you are telling the player that it is a DVD-ROM and the disc will be played in any player. DVD-R does not allow booktyping.
You can use the booktyping to trick a DVD player into thinking the disc is of a form that it should be able to play. However, that doesn't mean that it actually can.

Pressed DVDs, DVD-R, and DVD+R discs are all physically different, and as such have different playback requirements. Now, these requirements are close enough to each other that a player not specifically designed to play one type may still be able to, such as how certain CD players made before CD-R came out can handle them. However, no burnable disc format is as compatible as the pressed disc formats in terms of playability.
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Old 02-07-08, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay G.
You can use the booktyping to trick a DVD player into thinking the disc is of a form that it should be able to play. However, that doesn't mean that it actually can.

Pressed DVDs, DVD-R, and DVD+R discs are all physically different, and as such have different playback requirements. Now, these requirements are close enough to each other that a player not specifically designed to play one type may still be able to, such as how certain CD players made before CD-R came out can handle them. However, no burnable disc format is as compatible as the pressed disc formats in terms of playability.
Then I suppose you can tell us a player that won't play a DVD burned with decent authoring software and booktyped as DVD-ROM? And don't forget that there are pressed DVDs that don't play properly because they were authored incorrectly too.

I'm assuming the reading laser on that player is working properly and not on its last legs which could possibly give a problem with a burned DVD due to slightly lower reflectivity.
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Old 02-07-08, 04:56 PM
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Then I suppose you can tell us a player that won't play a DVD burned with decent authoring software and booktyped as DVD-ROM?
I can't name a player offhand, but then I can't name a CD player that can't play CD-R offhand either, and those certainly exist.

Again, altering the book type of the media via bitsetting certainly may increase computability, but it's not going to make it as compatible as a pressed disc. Contrary to your claims that "player compatibility really has nothing to do with whether the disc is pressed or burned," at the least recordable media relies heavily on the brand, while I've never heard of a pressed DVD being pressed on the wrong "brand" of media.

Even looking at sites that promote bitsetting, most make the distinction that it only increases the chances of computability with player, it doesn't make that compatibility absolute.
http://www.cdfreaks.com/reviews/Incr...DVD-bitsetting
"This results in an increased chance that the player is able to read the disc"

http://www.signvideo.com/btst-d.htm
"If you really want 98% or 100% compatibility for your DVD projects, the only sure way is to have the disks replicated"

That second link mentions a lot of other factors for increasing compatibility, such as setting the audio and video bitrates significantly below the maximum allowed by the DVD-Video standard. If the differences between pressed and burned DVDs were really such a non-issue, than these adjustments for burned DVDs shouldn't be necessary.

And don't forget that there are pressed DVDs that don't play properly because they were authored incorrectly.
In the case of authoring, that's media independent, as it'd play at least as poorly on a burned disc, so it's not worth mentioning. I will say that an improperly authored pressed disc will at least be read by the player's drive, while the same material on a burned disc may not even get that far.
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Old 02-09-08, 07:36 AM
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If 960x540 or 1920x1080 resolution is burned onto a DVD-R disc, what will be required for it to be played on the PC? Must the PC have HD or BluRay drive?
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Old 02-10-08, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Terri
If 960x540 or 1920x1080 resolution is burned onto a DVD-R disc, what will be required for it to be played on the PC? Must the PC have HD or BluRay drive?
Assuming you already have the higher resolution video already on your hard drive as a video file, and you just straight burn that file to a DVD-R, you won't need anything to play it back from the DVD-R that you didn't need to play it back from your hard drive.

Of course, if you take that disc to a different PC, then there may be issues where the other PC doesn't have the required software or codecs already installed, or it may simply not be powerful enough to handle such high resolutions.
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Old 02-13-08, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by X
Use DVD+R and set the booktype to DVD-ROM when you burn it... and it almost certainly will play.
If the DVD player says that it plays DVD-R, should I not set the booktype to DVD-R when I burn a DVD-R disc? Or if the player says that it plays DVD+R, set the booktype to DVD+R when burning a DVD+R disc?
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Old 02-13-08, 12:14 PM
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You can't set the booktype of DVD-R. So it stays looking like DVD-R.

You don't need to do anything to keep a DVD+R looking like a DVD+R unless you have DVD-ROM booktyping turned permanently on for your burner. Turning it off leaves the DVD+R saying it's a DVD+R.

I would (and do) always set the booktype of DVD+R to DVD-ROM because players will all play DVD-ROM. You can't count on having that one player that says it supports DVD+R always being the player you'll use with that DVD.
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Old 03-07-08, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by X
...set the booktype to DVD-ROM when you burn it. ...and it almost certainly will play.
I can't choose such a setting in Windows DVD Maker. The only settings to choose between are aspect ratio, 4:3 or 16:9, and video format, NTSC or PAL.

I have used DVD-R discs with good results. The discs will burn HD resolution files and play them in a DVD-player. BUT, they will not capture the high resolution, but only present the file in full best looking DVD resolution (720x480?). I compared the resolution when playing a file directly in the computor (which gave full HD resolution) and the same file from the burned DVD disc. The DVD disc was not as sharp.


Anyone famliar with IZArc? How do you make it convert files into a choosen format? It converted a .RAR file into .AVI file (which doesn't give any picture), but I can't convert it into MPG or WMV.

Last edited by Terri; 03-07-08 at 12:56 PM.
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Old 03-07-08, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Terri
I have used DVD-R discs with good results. The discs will burn HD resolution files and play them in a DVD-player. BUT, they will not capture the high resolution, but only present the file in full best looking DVD resolution (720x480?). I compared the resolution when playing a file directly in the computor (which gave full HD resolution) and the same file from the burned DVD disc. The DVD disc was not as sharp.
This is completely normal if you're recording it as a video DVD to be watched on a DVD player.

Anyone famliar with IZArc? How do you make it convert files into a choosen format? It converted a .RAR file into .AVI file (which doesn't give any picture), but I can't convert it into MPG or WMV.
IZarc is an archive maker/extractor. As such, it only works with archive file formats like RAR and ZIP. It didn't "convert" the RAR into an AVI, it extracted the AVI file that was contained within the RAR.
http://www.izarc.org/

If you want something that converts between the various video container files and various codecs, then you'll need a video converter program. You should probably check out this link for guidance:
http://www.videohelp.com/convert

Also, the reason why the AVI isn't showing a picture is likely because it uses a video codec your PC doesn't have a decoder for.

Last edited by Jay G.; 03-07-08 at 07:23 PM.
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Old 03-08-08, 03:59 AM
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Thanks for the info.


Originally Posted by Jay G.
This is completely normal if you're recording it as a video DVD to be watched on a DVD player.
I burned the DVD-R in my computor which can play HD resolution files. But the disc will not show in HD resolution on the computor (that it doesn't show in HD resolution on my regular DVD player and TV I can fully understand). So I think DVD-R discs are unable to register all of the resolution details. It takes HD or BluRay discs to do that.

Last edited by Terri; 03-08-08 at 04:02 AM.
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Old 03-08-08, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Terri
I burned the DVD-R in my computor which can play HD resolution files. But the disc will not show in HD resolution on the computor (that it doesn't show in HD resolution on my regular DVD player and TV I can fully understand). So I think DVD-R discs are unable to register all of the resolution details. It takes HD or BluRay discs to do that.
It's not the disc that's the problem; the HD DVD spec actually allows for authoring on recordable DVDs. The problem is that you're burning the disc in the DVD-Video format. If you just burned the original video file straight to a DVD-R as a DVD data disc, than the only issue would be storage space: whether the file is small enough to fit on the disc. The simplest way to do that is to not use Windows DVD Maker, but to put a blank DVD in the drive and then drag-and-drop the file onto the DVD like you would for moving the file to any other drive.
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Old 03-08-08, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay G.
It's not the disc that's the problem; the HD DVD spec actually allows for authoring on recordable DVDs. The problem is that you're burning the disc in the DVD-Video format. If you just burned the original video file straight to a DVD-R as a DVD data disc, than the only issue would be storage space: whether the file is small enough to fit on the disc. The simplest way to do that is to not use Windows DVD Maker, but to put a blank DVD in the drive and then drag-and-drop the file onto the DVD like you would for moving the file to any other drive.
Hmm... I wonder if that is possible on my computor. I will give it a try. Maybe it is a similar procedure as when you burn information onto a CD-R disc in Windows Media Player, which I haven't tried yet.
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Old 03-08-08, 04:48 PM
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Which is really preferable of WMV and MPG for DVD resolution? MPG seems to have more color. WMV is perhaps slightly sharper, but muddier in fast picture movement. Although this isn't always consistent.
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Old 03-08-08, 10:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Terri
Hmm... I wonder if that is possible on my computor. I will give it a try.
If you have Vista, dragging and dropping the file straight to the disc should work fine. XP doesn't have drag-and-drop for DVDs, so you'll need a third party software to make a data DVD, like this one:
http://cdburnerxp.se/

Maybe it is a similar procedure as when you burn information onto a CD-R disc in Windows Media Player, which I haven't tried yet.
That's a different procedure, as you're making an audio CD, not a data CD with that procedure. Go here for more info:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...ptember16.mspx

Which is really preferable of WMV and MPG for DVD resolution? MPG seems to have more color. WMV is perhaps slightly sharper, but muddier in fast picture movement. Although this isn't always consistent.
Well, that depends. WMV has had several different versions over the years. WMV 9 is essentially the same codec as VC-1, which is used in HD DVD and BD, so it should work fine. Even earlier WMV codecs were based off of MPEG-4 Part 2, which was at least on par with MPEG 2.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Media_Video

MPG is usually the file extension for MPEG 1, which is a codec that's several decades old at this point.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPEG-1

It may also be used as a file extension for MPEG 2, which is a better codec.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPEG-2

I'm assuming your comparisons of the video extensions have been of different sources at different bitrates. You'd be best served by comparing codecs by compressing the same source into the different formats using the same bitrates and resolution.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_video_codecs

However, if you're burning SD video to a DVD-R, it'd probably be best in terms of compatibility to just burn it as a DVD Video disc.

Last edited by Jay G.; 03-11-08 at 08:15 PM.
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Old 03-11-08, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay G.
...the HD DVD spec actually allows for authoring on recordable DVDs. ... The simplest way to do that is to not use Windows DVD Maker, but to put a blank DVD in the drive and then drag-and-drop the file onto the DVD like you would for moving the file to any other drive.
Thanks.

Yepp, it worked with the DVD-R. Burned much faster than a DVD-burning, and you can add more afterwards (it's not sealed or finalized after burning). Looks like the DVD-R disc grasped the full HD resolution. Of course, the disc will not play in a DVD player, but the computor plays it. Seems like it has to work hard for it, because it makes humming noice during play.

It's not convenient like a DVD-disc with menue, where you just play and easily pick chapters. This works more like a raw storage disc, you open the disc folder in the computor and choose files.

A DVD-R disc will fit about half the time HD material compared to DVD material. Some 75 minutes. So a full feature movie will not fit.
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