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Difference between 28mm and 35mm camera lens

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Difference between 28mm and 35mm camera lens

Old 10-16-07, 02:11 PM
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Difference between 28mm and 35mm camera lens

I'm between two cameras

Canon SD870 IS and Canon SD 950 IS

The 870 is an 8MP with 28mm lens
The 950 is 12MP 36mm lens

I don't have enough experience with cameras to make a smart decision between these two. I would use the camera as a point and shoot mostly for pics of my kids, and family. Most would say you don't need 12MP, but I could definately see my wife wanting poster sized prints. Maybe I should wait, and hope Canon eventually puts the 28mm lens in a 12MP package. What do you think. Thanks.

The 950: http://thedigitalnerds.com/product.a...2083B001&tab=1

The 870: http://www.amazon.com/Canon-PowerSho...2558281&sr=8-1
Old 10-16-07, 05:10 PM
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If you like to shoot wide photography, then the SD870 is a better fit. If you want more reach and know you shot more often at maximum optical zoom, then the SD950 is a better choice.

As for the MP deal, 8MP is moe than enough and even crop and still print out poster size. The 12MP in consumer cameras is just a marketing BS.
Old 10-16-07, 05:18 PM
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Thanks Zuffy.
Old 10-16-07, 09:03 PM
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Scroll down to near the bottom of this page: http://www.kenrockwell.com/canon/sd800.htm and see a "How long" and "How wide" comparison between the Canon SD800 (28-105 mm lens, like the SD870) and SD700 (35-140 mm lens, somewhat like the SD950).
Old 10-17-07, 10:18 AM
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I guess I'd be better off with the wide lens. If 8MP is enough, as zuffy stated then I could always digitally zoom in using PhotoShop. But I can't use PhotoShop to add an image that was never captured. Thanks. Great link.
Old 10-17-07, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by parrotheads4
I guess I'd be better off with the wide lens. If 8MP is enough, as zuffy stated then I could always digitally zoom in using PhotoShop. But I can't use PhotoShop to add an image that was never captured. Thanks. Great link.
I much prefer the wide lens versus the more telephoto lens. Most point-and-shoot pics are taken at less than 6 feet from the subject. The wider lens is much more practical. Imaging trying to fit a dozen people while standing just a few feet away, or trying to get 4 people into a pic while holding the camera yourself. Much, much easier with a wider lens.

And like you said, if you need to zoom in more than the camera allows, you can always zoom on the computer.
Old 11-23-07, 11:05 AM
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I went with the Canon SD870 IS. This is the one with the wide angle lens. I took it to Disney World, and took lots of pics and AVIs. Wide angle was the way to go.
My kids wanted pics with the Disney characters. Many people were lined up for these character photos - but with cameras lacking the wide angle lens. I noticed they were stepping back - making their kids smaller in the frame to fit everything in - while I was stepping closer. Great!
I should comment on the camera performance a bit. This camera has recieved rave reviews. My experience was mixed. I mostly used "Auto" shooting mode. Daytime shots are amazing. I can't imagine them being any better. In "Auto" the camera struggled with back lit shots, but other than that it was great.
Night shots are a whole different story. Noise. This is mentioned in reviews, but it needs to be mentioned again. Noise. Also, the flash is week. You need to be close to your target to capture it well.
One more knock. My son is studying Mandarin, and was very interested in visiting China at Epcot. I took a picture of him in the restaurant trying to capture him, and the surroundings. In auto mode the camera flashed, and captured him, but not the background. It might as well have been a pic of him at home. Switching the camera setting to "Indoor" mode fixed this to an acceptable level, but not perfect.
Now the positives. The video mode is knocked in a lot of reviews, but I found it to be great. It is so convenient to have. Sometimes a pic can't capture the emotion of an experience. I used it on a ride called "Test Track". The movie clip really captures the intensity of the acceleration. A nice feature to have, and the video is pretty good. This really is a pocket camera too. I carried it in my front pocket ready to be pulled out for a quick snap at a moments notice. The image stabilization works great. Pull the camera out of your pocket, snap, done. I love it.
Old 11-24-07, 07:04 AM
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Well the thing you describe just sounds like any pocket camera made nowadays. Don't worry, experiment with manual function when you take night pictures. With a correct exposure setting, you can avoid the problem you just mention above (taking picture with flash but nothing on the background, back lit shots, or some other things). The IS will definitely help in this condition.
Old 11-26-07, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by eedoon
Well the thing you describe just sounds like any pocket camera made nowadays. Don't worry, experiment with manual function when you take night pictures. With a correct exposure setting, you can avoid the problem you just mention above (taking picture with flash but nothing on the background, back lit shots, or some other things). The IS will definitely help in this condition.
Absolutely.

Unless you have a really powerful flash, the flash will generally capture the subjects but not the background. Pretty much every point-and-shoot digital camera will have a weak flash. Even on DSLRs with a built-in flash, you will run into same problems. DSLRs with an external flash, it only gets marginally better. Flash photography is really meant for subjects 6-12 feet.

As for the noise, try changing the ISO from Auto or High to something lower like 200 or 400 for night shots. This will result in a lower shutter speed, but it will also reduce the noise significantly. Of course, lower shutter speed may also mean increased blurriness due to shake, and this is where the IS will help. If not, a tripod will definitely help.

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