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Having 2 Ethernet Ports, one connected to a Laptop and one to the wall

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Having 2 Ethernet Ports, one connected to a Laptop and one to the wall

Old 09-04-05, 10:46 AM
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Having 2 Ethernet Ports, one connected to a Laptop and one to the wall

I was wondering if this was a possible setup, with 2 ethernet ports in a desktop, one leading to the wall to connect it to the internet, and the other leading to a laptop. I could not get the laptop to work, and I'm wondering if this is even possible. Any tips?
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Old 09-04-05, 10:59 AM
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Yep, Turn on Internet Connection Sharing (ICS).
http://www.annoyances.org/exec/show/ics
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Old 09-04-05, 05:02 PM
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Or bridge the two connections. That could work too, depending on what your network topology looks like.
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Old 09-04-05, 07:42 PM
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if it's going directly from the desktop to the laptop you need a crossover cable and not a normal ethernet cable
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Old 09-04-05, 09:12 PM
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What mikehunt said. Ethernet cards are expected to be connected to a hub or router of some kind - in fact, the pins on the port are wired that way. So if you just connect two cards with a normal cable, they won't be able to communicate. You can either put some kind of router or hub between them, or you can use a cable with the wiring reversed, which is called a crossover cable. Looks like a normal cable, but is marked differently.

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Old 09-04-05, 10:03 PM
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Actually, quite a lot of network cards nowadays have auto sensing capabilities to detect incorrectly crossed pairs. If it's a higher end card or motherboard (especially if the mobo has gigabit ethernet on the board), then a normal cable will usually work fine.
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Old 09-05-05, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Otto
Actually, quite a lot of network cards nowadays have auto sensing capabilities to detect incorrectly crossed pairs. If it's a higher end card or motherboard (especially if the mobo has gigabit ethernet on the board), then a normal cable will usually work fine.
Actually, I'm glad you posted this. A friend managed to network two computers with a regular cable a while back. I couldn't believe it when I saw the lights lit on each network card and the computers transferring files. Figured it was a miswired cable, or that, secondarily, one of the cards was just compensating (had never heard of it before.) Guess I have my answer now!

- David Stein
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