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Best Vid Capture Box?

Old 05-24-04, 11:00 AM
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Best Vid Capture Box?

What is the best Breakout box for capturing video from VHS and Hi-8? I was thinking about Pinnacle, but I read some bad reviews.
I'd appreciate any and all suggestions.
Thanks.
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Old 05-24-04, 11:33 AM
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As was suggested in your other thread (http://www.dvdtalk.com/forum/showthr...hreadid=352887) the Canopus ADVC-100 is a good choice. I've also looked into another product (whose name escapes me at the moment) that is less expensive and was reported to have better picture quality. The Canopus was superior if you had lip sync problems (which seemed to be pretty rare).

However these boxes feed AVI into the computer and you still need to convert to MPEG-2 before burning to DVD. That can be a very slow process. So I was also looking at this http://www.adstech.com/products/USBA...p?pid=USBAV702 but I ended up getting this http://www.adstech.com/products/USBA...p?pid=USBAV701 since it was on sale for $50. These boxes do the MPEG-2 conversion in hardware and pass it on to the computer so it's faster to disc.
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Old 05-24-04, 12:10 PM
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I use the Datavideo DAC-100.
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Old 05-24-04, 12:37 PM
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Originally posted by Patman
I use the Datavideo DAC-100.
That's the one I was trying to think of.

How long does it take you to convert the AVI to a DVD?
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Old 05-24-04, 01:16 PM
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It depends on the quality mode chosen on TMPGEnc.

On the low quality (non-VBR) CBR (bitrate around 4500) with no other filtering, you can do a 2 hours AVI file in 150-180 minutes.

Then as you go up in quality, the encoding times goes up as well.

If you do a 2-pass VBR on a 2 hour AVI file, it's around 4 hours, I think. If you throw in noise reduction, double the time again (and it can get outrageous if you chose "High Quality" on the noise reduction filter, 37-45 hours, or 8-12 hours without the HQ with noise reduction).
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Old 05-24-04, 03:13 PM
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I just used my ADS box to convert a 27 minute movie from VHS.

It took 27 minutes to record in 8 mbps DVD format (plus a few minutes to set up and edit the endpoints) and about 5 minutes to render to a DVD image. A couple more minutes to burn it and I have a DVD.
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Old 05-24-04, 05:51 PM
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re: capture to MPEG 2 vs. DV (AVI).

DV is the better editing format. It was designed for such, so it doesn't do any inter-frame compression (ie in MPEG speak, there's no B or P frames, just I frames). This means there aren't any issues at all as to which frames you can cut on.

Also, encoding from DV, you can do a lot more tweaking to the MPEG 2 encoding to improve its quality. Typically, recording MPEG 2 in real time (hardware or software), you're limited to single-pass, constant bit rate encodes. Converting from DV, you can do multi-pass, variable bit rate encodes with pre-processing and filtering.

If you use a high bitrate, real-time MPEG 2 encodes can look pretty good, but if you want to be able to squeeze more than 1 hr on a DVD-R without the video looking horrible, you need to do more sophisticated encoding.
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Old 05-24-04, 06:09 PM
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The ADS box I used has variable bit rate encoding but I haven't tried it yet. I used the highest bitrate compatible with DVD which is 8 mbps (9 mbps might work but I haven't tried it) and has temporal and spatial pre-processing filters which I'm still experimenting with.

The 27 minute video is 1.7GB which looks like I can get around 1.25 hours on a DVD at that bitrate.

Here are the features of the box:

USB 2.0 connection to the PC, backward compatible to USB 1.1
Capture audio and video via the USB port with “Audio-Lock” technology for perfect lip synch
Use temporal and spatial video pre-processing filters to help reduce noise on old VHS tapes or TV signals.
Supports MPEG 1 Layer 2 compressed and LPCM Audio
Capture from any analog video source in MPEG-1 or MPEG-2 video formats
including VCD, SVCD and DVD formats via RCA (Composite) or S-VHS video inputs.
Capture DVD (MPEG-2) at video bit rates from 1 Mb/sec. up to 15 Mb/sec. (up to 4 Mb/sec. for USB 1.1 connections)
Capture using Constant or Variable bit rates and other custom settings.
Features a 9 bit video digitizer with 2x oversampling and 4 line comb filter
Brightness, Contrast, Chroma, Saturation and Hue controls
Use Video Studio 7 SE DVD to capture and then burn to disk in quick, simple steps.
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Old 05-24-04, 06:37 PM
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It's not impossible to do VBR in real-time. It's just not as good because they have to limit the scene analysis to a narrow time window.
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