Tech Talk Discuss PC Hardware, Software, Internet and Other Technology

How do you learn to manage a network?

Old 05-07-04, 03:31 AM
  #1  
Uber Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Overlooking Pearl Harbor
Posts: 16,232
How do you learn to manage a network?

Our company is slowly being pulled into the computing age, and we've finally got a serious network setup here. We're currently relying on a guy in house who's pretty much learned this stuff on his own.

Is it still possible to learn this stuff on your own? And if so, how do you do this?

There are 5 servers involved...one's a file server, 2 primary and 2 backups. I believe they're all running Windows 2000 Server.

There are about 15 computers connected on this network and I believe 2 or 4 are still running W98, most are on WinXP pro, and a few arer running Windows 2000.

Besides wanting to understand how a network is designed and put together, I also want to know how to troubleshoot and maintain it. I'd also like to learn how to setup virtual private networking as I believe we're going to need to do it in the near future.

I'm not asking for anyone to explain this stuff to me, I'm just trying to figure out the best way to learn this stuff: classes (and if so, which ones)? books? the net? build a network at home and learn by doing?

Or is this just way more work than I want to do?
Blade is offline  
Old 05-07-04, 03:56 AM
  #2  
Video Gamer Reviewers
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 4,162
I'd do it with books... but lowcost training courses at a community college are generally a good way to go.

trial and error... is your company looking to have you take over some of the work?
jrobinson is offline  
Old 05-07-04, 04:05 AM
  #3  
Uber Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Overlooking Pearl Harbor
Posts: 16,232
Not necessarily. I'm just more concerned about having only one person who knows what to do when we have a problem with the network.

We're also having an odd software problem with an app that works over the network and our vendor told me that we might be "encountering network/connectivity problems. Your network administrator will need to monitor network activity to determine where the problems are occurring." It bothers me that I don't have the faintest idea how to "monitor network acitvity."

I was wondering if community college courses were really any good. Glad to hear that's a viable method.
Blade is offline  
Old 05-07-04, 04:52 AM
  #4  
Video Gamer Reviewers
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 4,162
Some people have a difference of opinion for community college standards... I mean, the community college I went too, Mr. Gates and Mr. Allen both seemed to contribute a good number of funds... as well, there were lots of industry professionals who taught night courses, because they enjoyed teaching. Anyways, in my opinion, community colleges can be great for IT training.

While some people can learn well out of a book, others need the dialogue, lectures, and interaction to learn. Since community college is usually cheap, it's a good solution. Of course, you're local community college may have an awful IT program... you'll just have to check around.
jrobinson is offline  
Old 05-07-04, 07:32 AM
  #5  
DVD Talk Legend
 
AGuyNamedMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: (formerly known as Inglenook Hampendick) Fairbanks, Alaska!
Posts: 15,218
Since you're looking for practical knowledge and skills to put to use right now, Community College coursework might be a good idea, since there will most likely be a lot of hands-on labwork. The commercial prepackaged courses taught in strip malls across America are a waste of cash, unless all you want to do is get paper certs. I'd recommend you look for a local users group and join it. Try to develop good relationships with nearby network professionals who have a similar network OS and structure (though probably much larger) who won't mind an email or phone call from time to time, or who might even mentor you a bit. Good luck!
AGuyNamedMike is offline  
Old 05-07-04, 07:40 AM
  #6  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Roswell
Posts: 2,345
Originally posted by Blade
Not necessarily. I'm just more concerned about having only one person who knows what to do when we have a problem with the network.

We're also having an odd software problem with an app that works over the network and our vendor told me that we might be "encountering network/connectivity problems. Your network administrator will need to monitor network activity to determine where the problems are occurring." It bothers me that I don't have the faintest idea how to "monitor network acitvity."
You can still pick it up by yourself. It's not easy, but it's not too bad. One thing though. While it's entirely possible that there is a network issue, the first excuse that always gets brought out with networked software is "network/connectivity problems" Most times, the sales/support people are full of crap and it's simply a network configuration that they didn't take into account while testing. Just my experience.
stp115 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.