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DSL on two computers?

Old 02-09-04, 09:51 AM
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DSL on two computers?

My soon to be inlaws are finally dropping AOL and getting Verizon DSL.

They have 2 computers. Can I just hook up each one with its own modem or is a router necessary?
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Old 02-09-04, 10:03 AM
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You'd get a router and plug the DSL into it and then each PC plugs into the router, sharing the connection.

Otherwise, you have to pay for 2 DSL accounts and 2 DSL modems.
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Old 02-09-04, 10:12 AM
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^ What he said. Get a router. You could go wireless. Check out www.newegg.com they seem to have the best prices and free shipping most of the time. I'd go with Netgear or D-Link. Lots of people say Linksys but I've had two Linksys and they didn't stay working for more than 10 min.
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Old 02-09-04, 12:33 PM
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Of course you can use one computer as a home-made router, if you know how to do it.
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Old 02-09-04, 01:01 PM
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Routers for dummies!

Can you offer more help on this? For instance, what would be a cheap router to accomplish this? I have SBC DSL that I'd like to access with a notebook and a desktop computer. Is there a guide for dummies like myself to follow? Ha ha! Thanks!
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Old 02-09-04, 01:17 PM
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Most routers for home use come right out of the box ready to work. The setup I have at home is basically, a coax cable coming out of the wall. This goes into the cable modem. There's another jack on the cable modem for a network cable. The network cable plugs into that jack on the modem, then the other end of the cable plugs in the router on a port labeled "WAN." Then there will be other ports on the router for you to plug your PC's into. Mine are labeled 1 through 4 (since I have a 4 port router). Network cables go in there and the other end is hooked to the PC's.

The router I had was already programed to grab an IP address from my ISP and to hand out its own IP's to all of my PC's hooked up to it. Plug everything in and it should work. There are ways to tweak the router, but if all you want is to get more than one PC on the internet, there's not much to it.

PS - DSL is same principle as cable, except instead of coax, you have a phone line plugging into the modem.
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Old 02-09-04, 01:36 PM
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Router preference?

Thanks for the reply VinVega. Do you have any recommendations for the router? Four ports should be enough for now. Also, is there any specific software that must be installed on each pc to access the signal from the router? As you can tell, I am new to this whole dsl/cable-router area!
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Old 02-09-04, 01:42 PM
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Re: Router preference?

Originally posted by IndyDVDGuru
Thanks for the reply VinVega. Do you have any recommendations for the router? Four ports should be enough for now. Also, is there any specific software that must be installed on each pc to access the signal from the router? As you can tell, I am new to this whole dsl/cable-router area!

No software unless you go wireless and then it depends on what you buy. To set up your router you just open up internet explorer and put in the router's IP address. Of course all of this is explained in the setup guide that comes with it. It should take you all of 5 min to set it all up. I'd go with D-Link or Netgear but others will suggest Linksys which I've had problems with.
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Old 02-09-04, 01:47 PM
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Thanks Mopower! It looks like its time to search the net for D-Link or NetGear deals!

Thanks for everyone's help.
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Old 02-09-04, 01:54 PM
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Get a wireless router. You can get the netgear wireless 802.11b router for about $25 AR

Here is the link:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...onics&n=507846

FYI: This has a 4 port wired router and also supports wireless. Some people don't realize that wireless routers also have wired ports.

Last edited by breaux124; 02-09-04 at 01:56 PM.
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Old 02-09-04, 02:00 PM
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I setup a network this weekend for my aunt.

NOTES:
Some Modems must be unplugged for extended periods of time to release and renew IPs. I was having trouble getting the modem to sync and get an IP for the router.

1. Unplugged everything for 2+minutes (Modem, router, powered down computers).
2. Plugged in Modem, wait until sync'd (status lights usually let you know)
3. Plugged in router (network cables already hooked up)
4. Turned on computers, and everything worked.

When I was just unplugging the modem for a few seconds it wasn't working, so if you run into problems try this.
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Old 02-09-04, 02:16 PM
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FYI, you can't use a router if it's dial-up DSL. If it's always on DSL/Cable, then router's the easiest way. Dial-up DSL will require 2 NICs on the computer playing the router role, and turn on net sharing.
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Old 02-10-04, 09:07 AM
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Thanks for the replies.....guess I will have to get the router. I was hoping to avoid it as I already have a spare DSL modem and one computer is upstairs and the other downstairs.

I suppose wireless is the way to go but I know they will complain about the cost.
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Old 02-10-04, 01:15 PM
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Would a D-Link DSS-8+ switch work for this or is a router the preferred method?

Thanks.
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Old 02-10-04, 01:22 PM
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Yes a switch will work, but it doesn't have firewall. The advantage of a dsl/cable router is built-in firewall, DHCP for auto assigning IP, and a bunch of other stuff. It's basically plug n play.
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Old 02-10-04, 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by FuzzyBallz
FYI, you can't use a router if it's dial-up DSL. If it's always on DSL/Cable, then router's the easiest way. Dial-up DSL will require 2 NICs on the computer playing the router role, and turn on net sharing.
If you get a router with the PPPoE client onboard then your DSL connection becomes an always on connection. If your DSL connection requires PPPoE, make sure you get a router that has it on board and then all is well.
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Old 05-02-04, 09:19 PM
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I'll be moving into an apartment with 2 other people in September, and we'll be getting SBC Yahoo DSL (the only broadband service in town.. no cable ). Anyway, from your guys' responses, it looks like I'll get that Netgear wireless router 802.11b, unless someone else can recommend a better one.

I'm a n00b when it comes to wireless routers, so can someone tell me the differences between 802.11b and 802.11g? Which one is better? Also, what can I do so that no one else can piggyback off our connection?
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Old 05-03-04, 12:42 AM
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Originally posted by Lethal Nemesis
I'm a n00b when it comes to wireless routers, so can someone tell me the differences between 802.11b and 802.11g? Which one is better? Also, what can I do so that no one else can piggyback off our connection?
802.11b was the first widespread wireless technology, introduced in 1999. 802.11g is the next-generation one, widely introduced in early 2003. 802.11b runs at 11 Mbps, 802.11g runs at 54 Mbps. 802.11g equipment is backwards compatible with 802.11b equipment.

For security and encryption, most 802.11b equipment only has WEP, a proven weak and problematic encryption scheme. A few of the newest 802.11b devices have WPA, which fixes almost all the problems of WEP. WPA is implemented almost universally on 802.11g equipment.

Because the price difference between 802.11b and 802.11g equipment is on the order of tens of dollars, I would definitely recommend going with 802.11g, and implement WPA on your network when you set it up for security.
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Old 05-03-04, 02:38 AM
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Thanks Todd B.! Your response is greatly appreciated.
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