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OK, is MP3 or Appler's AAC better?

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OK, is MP3 or Appler's AAC better?

Old 12-30-03, 12:25 PM
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OK, is MP3 or Appler's AAC better?

What do you guys think?
Old 12-30-03, 12:27 PM
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AAC is proven better. Mp3s have more soft/hardware that play them.
Old 12-30-03, 06:23 PM
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If you encode with the Lame mp3 encoder (--alt preset -standard), you'll be hard pressed to find a better compression scheme.
Old 12-31-03, 03:32 PM
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Almost every sound format is better than MP3.

MP3 is just the most popular.

That being said.. when encoded properly (LAME, listed above).. you'll need good equipment and/or ears to really tell the difference in sound quality. For some formats, all you need is some common sense to see the difference in filesize.
Old 12-31-03, 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by PixyJunket
Almost every sound format is better than MP3.

MP3 is just the most popular.

That being said.. when encoded properly (LAME, listed above).. you'll need good equipment and/or ears to really tell the difference in sound quality. For some formats, all you need is some common sense to see the difference in filesize.
Well I can tell the different between 128 kbs vs. 192 kbs. Just wondering if AAC would be better in the long run.
Old 12-31-03, 05:46 PM
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AAC is good. The LAME method (http://www.chrismyden.com/nuke/modul...&file=painless) is also good and compatible with any MP3 player
Old 12-31-03, 07:12 PM
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The mp3 standard is fairly old and was designed not to require too much processing power. Newer coders have the benefit of having higher baseline processor targets and as such can employ more aggressive data reduction techniques. AAC is an example of such a newer coder and as such it can produce the same audio quality as MP3 at a much smaller file size or noticeably better sound quality at the same file size.

However, you really shouldn't think of MP3 or any of the newer coders as an archival format. That is, you should always keep the original source around and then use that to produce whatever type of data reduced files you need as the technology changes.
Old 12-31-03, 07:38 PM
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Lately I've been encoding new rips using iTunes AAC at 160 kbps and I'm hard pressed to tell the difference between that and LAME --aps. I also encoded some comedy albums using AAC at 64 kbps and it works fantastically.

I've pretty much switched to AAC, although I still don't like iTunes ripper, and still use EAC for that.

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