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Technical Certifications?

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Technical Certifications?

Old 02-02-03, 03:31 AM
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Technical Certifications?

I'm interested in getting some techincal certifactions & I know we have some IT people here & wanted to get their thoughts. Are they worth it? What ones should I start with. I currently do technical support for a large ISP & with all the recent lay ff sI'm kind of looking for a new job, I'm also working on a degree but I won't have that for a couple years. Thanks.
Old 02-02-03, 10:09 AM
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Depends on what you do. Microsoft has a certification program for Windows admins. Cisco has their own program for their equipment. Other companies all have their own programs.
Old 02-02-03, 12:51 PM
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You could always start at the bottom of the certification ladder and work your way up. That meaning is get your A+ and Network+ certs and then go after all of the Microsoft ones. Certs don't guarantee anything though. I've got an A+ and a B.S. in Computer Science and I'm still looking for entry level work.
Old 02-02-03, 06:02 PM
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I have an associates in an IT-related discipline and 7 years of development experience. Last year, I decided to upgrade my skills, and obtained 3 premium Microsoft certifications comprised of 10 different subjects. It didn't make any difference; none of the resumes I sent out brought replies.

At one time, the Microsoft certifications were hot skills, but not anymore.

If you're going to invest money and time in skills, I'd suggest moving away from IT into a new major. Evidence suggests that over the next 10 years, there will be a massive outflow of IT-related positions to low-wage countries like India, totalling some 3.5 million positions with $135 billion in annual wages.

RD
Old 02-02-03, 06:24 PM
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It all depends upon what you want out of it. If you want to concentrate on a specific product/company then getting their certs wouldn't hurt (although most likely they may not help either, nothing beats "real world" experience). If you don't want to focus on a specific area then look at the more generic certifications (CISSP, Net+, A+, SANS, etc). Personally I think the biggest determining factors are:

- Why do want it (is it going to help you get to where you want to be or are you just collecting "feathers" for your cap)?

- Are you willing to put the effort into it (to get it and then maintain it)?

- Do you have to pay for it on your own or will your company pick it up?
Old 02-02-03, 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by DivxGuy
I have an associates in an IT-related discipline and 7 years of development experience. Last year, I decided to upgrade my skills, and obtained 3 premium Microsoft certifications comprised of 10 different subjects. It didn't make any difference; none of the resumes I sent out brought replies.

At one time, the Microsoft certifications were hot skills, but not anymore.

If you're going to invest money and time in skills, I'd suggest moving away from IT into a new major. Evidence suggests that over the next 10 years, there will be a massive outflow of IT-related positions to low-wage countries like India, totalling some 3.5 million positions with $135 billion in annual wages.

RD
I totally agree. CSR and programming is alread being sent to India and the Phillipines. I'm changing my major to accounting and will change my career within 4 years at the most. Unless you know niche stuff like UNix, Linux, EMC or some other really high end software I would suggest getting out of IT.
Old 02-03-03, 09:59 AM
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Here's a couple of links I dug about when looking into this myself. As others have mentioned though programming is moving overseas but hands-on tech support is here to stay IMHO.

http://www.newsfactor.com/perl/story/20600.html - Good article about the value of certifications

http://www.certmag.com/issues/dec02/...gabelhouse.cfm - Certification Magazine article on the same subject (gives some very specific stats on salaries and vendor programs)

http://www.tcpmag.com/salarysurveys/ - TCP Magazine's 2002 Cisco salary survey

http://www.crn.com/sections/special/...rticleID=35952 - CRN's 2002 salary survey focusing specifically on the impact of
certifications.

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