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Need help connecting two computers (XP and 98) to the Internet (Road Runner)

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Need help connecting two computers (XP and 98) to the Internet (Road Runner)

Old 09-12-02, 10:29 PM
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Need help connecting two computers (XP and 98) to the Internet (Road Runner)

I'm trying to connect my family's laptop (some IBM ThinkPad with Windows 98) and my sister's laptop (some Compaq Presario with Windows XP) to the Internet (Road Runner cable modem). Both laptops have their own Ethernet network cards, and both are plugged into a simple 4-port hub, which in turn is connected to the cable modem.

I've been able to get each computer to connect to the Internet separately, but not simultaneously. Under the advice of a friend, I created an account on the Windows XP computer and have been using that login and password on the Windows 98 computer. That doesn't work, though.

Is the problem the hub? Should I be using a router instead? The Windows XP network troubleshooter suggests using the Network Setup feature on the Windows XP CD - should I do this? Or should I have one computer (e.g. the Windows XP computer) connected to the Internet as a host, and have the other computer connected to it as a client? If so, how would I physically connect the two computers? Via a USB cable?

Any help would be appreciated.
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Old 09-12-02, 10:43 PM
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hmmm...try a proxy server. i hooked up my laptop running '98 to my desktop running XP using a crossover cable, and had to use a proxy.

http://www.webattack.com/Freeware/network/fwproxy.shtml
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Old 09-12-02, 11:45 PM
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OK, I have no idea what you're talking about. How would I connect the two computers, and which one is connected to the 'net (or are both?), and what's a crossover cable?
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Old 09-12-02, 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by criptik28
OK, I have no idea what you're talking about. How would I connect the two computers, and which one is connected to the 'net (or are both?), and what's a crossover cable?
ok, well, a proxy helps computers with different OS share devices (usually internet). set up your XP computer as a server, and set up the '98 as the client. then install the proxy server on the XP computer. a crossover cable is for direct connection between two computers directly without a hub. it switches two pins of the cat 5 cable, IIRC.
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Old 09-13-02, 06:26 AM
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D. Phlowbee, since both these computers are laptops, I seriously doubt that one of them has two ethernet cards, which is needed to do proxy sharing. Considering that ethernet cards for laptops tend to be as expensive as a cheap router, this isn't a good solution in this case. Plus, since either one of these laptops may be travelling at any given time, it's a poor solution in this case.

criptik, you can do one of two things to get this up and running easily. One, you can call Time Warner and ask for an extra IP. This will probably cost about $15 a month. Or, you can buy a router and share the one IP you currently have. A cheap router shouldn't be more than $60, and a good one should be no more than $100.

Proxy serving can be a good thing, in the right situation, but it's generally overkill for a home network. Add in the fact that most users don't know enough to properly set up, maintain and secure a firewall and they typically use the proxy server as a 'main' computer and I just don't think it's a good solution for home networking.
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Old 09-13-02, 08:16 AM
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Damn, then what in the world did I buy a hub for? What's the difference between a hub and router?
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Old 09-13-02, 08:19 AM
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Definitely go with the cheap router (Linksys is my preference). It will generate internal IP addresses from the one IP address RR gives you. This will allow multiple computers access to the internet at the same time using one IP address. Plus it provides a nice little firewall to hinder hackers from having complete access to your PC.
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Old 09-13-02, 08:22 AM
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A hub just allows multiple computers to plug into the network, just think of it like a splitter. Your cable modem service only gives you one internet address (IP), so you can't plug 2 computers into the hub and expect it to work, you are 1 IP address short. A router takes that IP address, and then does it's magic and allows multiple computers to connect to the cable modem service.
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Originally posted by criptik28
Damn, then what in the world did I buy a hub for? What's the difference between a hub and router?
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Old 09-13-02, 08:23 AM
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Don't get rid of the hub though...if you end up getting more than 4 computers (I know, probably a stretch ), you can use your hub to connect the extra computers. Your router will then generate the new IP addresses for the extra computers and your hub will distribute them to the other PCs. The way I used my hub and router was that one PC was on one side of the room and my 2 other PCs were on the other side of the room. Rather than have 2 wires running across the room, I ran one wire around the room from the router to the hub, then connected the 2 computers to the hub (1 wire around the room, rather than 2).
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Old 09-13-02, 12:21 PM
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I'm trying to do the same thing to get a laptop with a wireless network card to use an existing desktop with a dsl connection. My friend with this setup already has a Linksys wireless rounter, but other than that I have no idea how to make it work. The desktop uses Windows 2000 Pro and the laptop uses Windows 98ME. The instructions with the Linksys router really blow.
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Old 09-13-02, 01:09 PM
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The operating systems shouldn't matter on a router-based system. The router doesn't care what computers are on the network, only that they either have static ip assigned or (preferably) they know how to ask for a DHCP server.

If it's wireless, and the wireless card can't find it, try checking the router settings to see that wireless is enabled, and that it will accept any wireless card in the area (unsecure). You might also want to see if the wireless laptop can see other wireless networks. Once you get the laptop on the network, try fiddling with the router to secure the network by allowing only cards with specific MAC addresses.
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Old 09-13-02, 01:18 PM
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Looks like a few of you need routers

This is a very good deal.

http://www.jandr.com/JRProductPage.p...618&showcase=t
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Old 09-13-02, 10:58 PM
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Nice! Thanks, I had no idea that a router was so different from a hub. No wonder they were so much more expensive.
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Old 09-17-02, 08:19 AM
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Originally posted by einTier
The operating systems shouldn't matter on a router-based system. The router doesn't care what computers are on the network, only that they either have static ip assigned or (preferably) they know how to ask for a DHCP server.

If it's wireless, and the wireless card can't find it, try checking the router settings to see that wireless is enabled, and that it will accept any wireless card in the area (unsecure). You might also want to see if the wireless laptop can see other wireless networks. Once you get the laptop on the network, try fiddling with the router to secure the network by allowing only cards with specific MAC addresses.

Actually I think it's a dynamic IP address. But I can't even get the desktop to work all my itself through the router so I can't even get to the aprt where I test out the laptop.
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Old 09-17-02, 03:14 PM
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Just to update...I simply replaced the hub with the router, and everything works fine. I even connected a printer to the router (via a parallel port connection), so now both laptops can print easily.
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Old 09-17-02, 05:24 PM
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so, the network doesn't work at all with the router in place?

When you type "ipconfig/all" in a command prompt, what response do you get? Can you see the router's configuration screen in a web browser? It's 192.168.123.254 on mine (SMC), but will be different on yours. I think linksys uses 192.168.1.1, but I could be mistaken.

If you can see the configuration screen, is the router leasing an IP? If it is not, you may need to do a hard reset on your DSL modem. Unplugging it for several minutes will probably do the trick.
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Old 09-17-02, 05:25 PM
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Here's a good page for configuring a Linksys router: http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...administration
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Old 09-17-02, 09:18 PM
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It's all set up now, thanks!
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Old 09-18-02, 03:47 AM
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criptik28, congratulations, but the instructions were more for icondude, who still seems to be having trouble with his linksys.
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Old 09-18-02, 04:09 AM
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I know. Thanks anyway.
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Old 09-18-02, 08:52 AM
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Originally posted by einTier
criptik28, congratulations, but the instructions were more for icondude, who still seems to be having trouble with his linksys.
Actually I think I may have found my answer in the other similiar thread:
http://www.dvdtalk.com/forum/showthr...hreadid=236441

Where it says to delete all the existing software that kinds of puts me off as I'd like to be able to easily go back. And einTier is correct about me not getting the login box when I go to 192.168.1.1. Anyway, this whole setup is at a friends house so I might not be able to report back for a while.
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Old 09-19-02, 09:11 AM
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Linksys Router

Network Card for each

I dont know if its the cheapest way, but its the easy way.
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