Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Religion, Politics and World Events
Reload this Page >

Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Religion, Politics and World Events They make great dinner conversation, don't you think? plus Political Film

Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Old 05-06-18, 09:30 PM
  #26  
DVD Talk Legend
 
hdnmickey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Cygnus
Posts: 12,524
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Internships and volunteer work should be enough. Education should always be a priority. After school activities are great too. I didn't work in high school because I wanted fantastic grades, get scholarships and go to a good college. I did start working right after graduation, and I wish I focused more on college. I worked too much, and did not study as much as I should had. I honestly do not blame some kids for not rushing to their after school fast food job. Sometimes they drop out of school and stay at those jobs. There are many internships that greatly help when they relate to your major. Everyone is different. I think retail is better to work for then fast food.
That's pretty much what I was thinking as well. Unless a kid is thinking of going into food franchising, they will be far better off spending what time do have to hold a job/or work with a group, doing something that will translate far better down the line. Pretty much all jobs, and even structured group activates, have schedules and responsibilities that teach discipline and working with others. Plus I doubt most of the jobs in the FF restaurant industry will really be the same by the time my child is old enough to take one.

Last edited by hdnmickey; 05-06-18 at 09:50 PM.
Old 05-06-18, 09:39 PM
  #27  
DVD Talk Reviewer
 
Kurt D's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 8,004
Received 121 Likes on 95 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by ameme91 View Post
When you're a teenager, you need working permit right? As a minor you are also limited on the hours you can work. I see tons of teens working where I live.

Also, as someone who is in their 20s, I have worked with teenagers since I was a teenager. There is little difference I have notice in work ethic. Some work hard and some are very lazy, like most people. Regardless of age, if they do not show up or do a half done job, they remain employed. It pisses me off. I will say most fast food restaurants I have done too, had younger people. It has been a hit or miss in food quality. It depends on your state and area.

Internships and volunteer work should be enough. Education should always be a priority. After school activities are great too. I didn't work in high school because I wanted fantastic grades, get scholarships and go to a good college. I did start working right after graduation, and I wish I focused more on college. I worked too much, and did not study as much as I should had. I honestly do not blame some kids for not rushing to their after school fast food job. Sometimes they drop out of school and stay at those jobs. There are many internships that greatly help when they relate to your major. Everyone is different. I think retail is better to work for then fast food.

As a teenager, I had a friend who did landscaping during the summers. He would make fantastic money. He had 2 cars; a pick up truck for landscaping and a sedan for other personal use. He was able to get an actually landscaping job after that. Everyone is different. Everyone wants something different. College is not for everyone, and there are many other options that may be a better choice.

Personally, why would an employer pay more for someone with no experience or very little with no higher then a high school education? The wage is fine unless your a teenager living alone. My wage is not fine, and I have bills and student loans to pay. I work where I have to..

I guess I feel like this article is lacking in many areas..

PS: They should also be able to live as teenagers. There is only one life.
Get back to work, whipper-snapper!



Welcome to the forum and thanks for sharing some good wisdom.
Old 05-06-18, 09:49 PM
  #28  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 16,171
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

I have worked since I was 14 years old, but that was a different time and place It seemed every teen worked then.

Today kids don't work (unless their parents need them to have income), they are too into high school sports (and the sports commitments don' t leave any time for anything else)
Old 05-07-18, 12:22 AM
  #29  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Norm de Plume's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Toronto
Posts: 17,517
Received 208 Likes on 162 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Oh yeah? I started working by choice when I was 12 (a hefty paper route)... and stopped working when I was 25, when my depression and anxiety became overwhelming. I have been on disability for about 15 years. But I digress...

I think Mabuse has the correct answer to this conundrum. Pay well and provide good benefits, and people will flock to you; and in turn, you as an employer can expect more of your employees. Better loyalty, punctuality, more flexibility, longevity, and exactitude in carrying out the job. A living income at minimum is what everyone needs.
Old 05-07-18, 01:31 AM
  #30  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Hazel Motes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 6,785
Received 116 Likes on 85 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

These days, even kids are wise to the fact that big corporate chains generally don't give a fuck about their employees. I'm not surprised that the teens they do find don't care about the job, where's the incentive? Why would they care? McDonalds is a shitty, go nowhere job that pays their employees in bread crumbs. They would rather see an employee go on welfare than give them a decent wage. I live in Vancouver B.C. I don't know what fast food places pay their employees here (I assume minimum wage), but I do know that for awhile, in Alberta, fast food employees were making 20 dollars an hour in oil towns that were popping up. They had NO ONE to work the jobs because the only people who lived there were working the oil rigs, so they had to create an incentive. The sad reality of all this, in higher populated places, its the older people and immigrants who need the jobs to live, who basically act as their own worst enemy. If they were telling the big corporate chains to fuck off like the teenagers seem to be doing, they would see their wages increase too, because the chains would have no choice but to incentivize. The only problem being, most people who need the jobs, can't go even a month without them, and the corporations know this. Thats why they have their workers by the balls. Hence why minimum wage exists.

Anyways I know I'm going off on a bit of a tangent here, but one more point I'd like to make. If you look up and read online about what its like to work at Walmart and then do a seperate search about what its like to work at Costco its pretty astounding. Like anything, im sure its not perfect, but by most accounts, Costco is a really good place to work. The average wage at Costco is 20 dollars an hour and they have company sponsored healthcare with only a 12% out of pocket premium for benefits. I have a friend who works there, and he told me point blank that people don't really quit Costco. Compare that to Walmart and the Waldens basically employ slave labor. And its the same damn job. It can be done. It's possible to pay a good wage with benefits. But most corporations don't give a fuck. Which is why I whole heartedly support kids not giving a fuck about a job that doesn't give a fuck about them.
Old 05-07-18, 04:07 AM
  #31  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Mike86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 21,475
Received 383 Likes on 296 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

I don’t think most teenagers that I knew or myself worked jobs like that because we need to make a ton of money. When I was that age I basically used what I made for car things (gas, insurance, etc.) and maybe entertainment like going to a movie or buying DVDs or video games and maybe a bit of savings. Jobs like that aren’t really intended to be lifetime positions for most people they’re more getting yourself in the workforce to gain some basic skills.
Old 05-07-18, 04:42 AM
  #32  
DVD Talk Hero
 
jfoobar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 38,675
Likes: 0
Received 68 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by Mike86 View Post
I don’t think most teenagers that I knew or myself worked jobs like that because we need to make a ton of money. When I was that age I basically used what I made for car things (gas, insurance, etc.) and maybe entertainment like going to a movie or buying DVDs or video games and maybe a bit of savings. Jobs like that aren’t really intended to be lifetime positions for most people they’re more getting yourself in the workforce to gain some basic skills.
100%, except the main reason why I got my first real job at 16 was because I was told I pretty much had to. My father, who was a successful engineer, told me he would either buy me a used car or pay for my car insurance but not both. He worked at a gas station in high school and in his eyes my brother and I were going to at least hold down a weekend job in high school also, so we both did. I plan on making the same bargain with my daughter when she is old enough.

Originally Posted by Hazel Motes View Post
These days, even kids are wise to the fact that big corporate chains generally don't give a fuck about their employees. I'm not surprised that the teens they do find don't care about the job, where's the incentive? Why would they care?
I doubt very, very seriously that most teenagers think in such grandiose terms. You either work because your family is poor and needs the help or, for the fortunate rest of us that grew up in better off families, because you need extra spending money while in school.

My dad certainly did not tell me I had to work at McDonalds or for any corporate giant at all. He just told me I had to work and make a little money to pay for my car insurance (and most other luxuries I wanted since my allowance was a pittance). And while I did work some fast food, I also worked for a construction site one summer and delivered newspapers during another. At no point during college did I not have a job, even during my internship. There were a couple of semesters there where I did pretty poorly in school but I can assure you that it had nothing to do with working. It had to do with my simply fucking off in school.

My experiences are just that: my experiences. However, I am of the opinion that not compelling a teenager to work somewhere is doing them a disservice. There are experiences to be had and values to be learned there and your kid will be better off having learned them before they start their adult life, degree in hand, rather than after.
Old 05-07-18, 06:02 AM
  #33  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
Michael Corvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 60,838
Received 371 Likes on 270 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by creekdipper View Post
I know many young "professionals" who worked minimum wage jobs and developed characteristic s such as punctuality, courtesy, perseverance, dedication, cooperation, adaptation, commitment, etc. Those stood them in good stead in their later careers. They also learned to budget their time and the value of earned money.


Education is the ultimate goal but all of these traits are for more important in the real world than most of the bullshit classes you have to take the first couple of years in college.

Both of my kids will be getting jobs at 16.
Old 05-07-18, 07:47 AM
  #34  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Home again, Big D
Posts: 31,653
Received 49 Likes on 43 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by Mike86 View Post
I think the point of a part time job for a kid in high school or college isn’t how much money you’re making or how great the job is. It’s more the idea of getting experience in the real world and interacting with people (co-workers and customers). Extra curricular activities in my opinion should be just that but now there’s a lot of emphasis on them that it takes any time away from having a job. Also the work force needs those kinds of positions filled or businesses just start suffering. No wonder so many places are going out of business, half it is probably not having the needed help. I get that other factors are involved too but if you don’t have people running your business it’s going to hurt you in the long run. A lot of places relied on their younger part time help to keep things flowing smoothly. Now everyone thinks that they should just go to college and be making big money right off the bat and anything else isn’t worthwhile. It’s a very entitled mentality that a lot of people have now days.
OH I agree. I just felt there were other ways to develope those attributes. For example, she became an Ambassador for her school. She would give tours talk about the college, answer questions to prospective students and their family. Can't remember if she got paid or not.

My point was more that I've heard other parents say "you have to work to at least pay for gas and books" or something like that. And if that's the purpose, that doesn't seem like a good return on investment considering the cost of tuition room/board.

Now I want to be clear. I was fortunate. I know that. I do think the student should work if the family can't afford it. The student should do the research and work for every grant they can get. But the student should not expect to family to go into significant debit, and I'd really question if the student should go into much debit at all. I worry about today's kids coming out with $60,000, $80,000+ debit and taking $30,000 a year job on graduation.
Old 05-07-18, 10:25 AM
  #35  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Mike86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 21,475
Received 383 Likes on 296 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Personal opinion but I feel like for a lot of people college is really sort of a waste. Unless you go in with something very specific in mind that you’ll be able to find a job in afterwards it’s just a way to get yourself in a lot of debt. Society has convinced us it’s so needed but I look at myself and so many others not even using our degrees. Luckily I didn’t wind up with debt but it’s rare. I think for a lot of people they’d be better off going to like a tech school or something because that puts you in a more specific field and they help place you in a job afterwards.
Old 05-07-18, 11:23 AM
  #36  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
GreenMonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 5,545
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by Mike86 View Post
Personal opinion but I feel like for a lot of people college is really sort of a waste. Unless you go in with something very specific in mind that you’ll be able to find a job in afterwards it’s just a way to get yourself in a lot of debt. Society has convinced us it’s so needed but I look at myself and so many others not even using our degrees. Luckily I didn’t wind up with debt but it’s rare. I think for a lot of people they’d be better off going to like a tech school or something because that puts you in a more specific field and they help place you in a job afterwards.
There are a ton of jobs that are very hard to get without checking the degree box. A lot of HR systems just kick you out without something.

It's hard to get started in a field without them.

There aren't a lot of decent paying jobs without a degree. There are some fields (like I.T.) that you can work your way up without a degree, but it is slower, and harder to move up, without something. Even a 2-yr degree helps a lot.

Trades are a good option, but then again, they're also hard on the body. My dad was a steelworker until he hurt his back, in his early 20s. My grandpa was a GM factory worker until he retired, but those kind of jobs have mostly vanished, at least at the decent payrates and nice benefits that he received.
Old 05-07-18, 11:59 AM
  #37  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Mike86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 21,475
Received 383 Likes on 296 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs therel

Yeah, and I do get that but I think it’s sort of silly for a lot of people. Like I said I think it’s something that society has come to expect of people and there’s more of an emphasis on just having a degree even if it’s not related to your exact field. I just know for myself and a lot of others that a degree is something I obtained but am really not using. It may have helped me get my job but for what I’m doing there’s no reason I actually need the skills I went to school for. There are exceptions in really specialized fields like medicine, law, etc. but by and large I think as a society we over emphasize the importance of actually having a degree. Basically we’ve made education just another way to make money off of people and make it really hard for them to not be in debt for a good chunk of their lives after graduation.

Last edited by Mike86; 05-07-18 at 12:36 PM.
Old 05-04-21, 12:40 AM
  #38  
Suspended
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Living in a van down by the river
Posts: 15,587
Received 218 Likes on 125 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

And three years later, NOBODY wants to work in the restaurant biz.

https://www.kansascity.com/news/busi...Y2acBAGwHEejk8

Text:

Lack of workers causing service problems, delaying opening of Kansas City restaurants
BY KEVIN HARDY AND JOYCE SMITH

Even during the pandemic, business was strong enough that The Big Biscuit breakfast chain was able to open several new restaurants.

Now with readily available vaccines and fewer public health restrictions, more and more consumers are flooding in for omelets, pancakes and biscuits and gravy.

“Demand is coming back,” said Chad Offerdahl, president of the Overland Park-based chain. “It’s surging.”

But workers haven’t been near as ready to return to restaurants as customers.

On Saturday, The Big Biscuit opened its Sonoma Plaza location in Lenexa. That opening was delayed by more than a week as the company struggled to hire the 50 workers needed to operate the new location. It was eventually staffed in part by bringing employees from other area locations.

Last spring, restaurant workers were among the first and most severely hurt by the coronavirus pandemic. Tens of thousands were pushed to state unemployment systems as restaurants closed dining rooms and focused on carryout business.

Now, just as customers are returning, restaurants don’t have the staff to run at full speed, causing longer waits, shortened hours of operation and delays in new restaurant openings.

The problem will only get worse this summer as a couple of dozen eateries have announced plans to open across the metro.

"We’ve never had a hiring drought like this before,” Offerdahl said. “This is new territory for us.”

Some employees left the industry altogether, finding work elsewhere as the need for restaurant workers dipped. And restaurant managers say they have a tough time competing with increased unemployment benefits. Some employees can take home more from unemployment than what they would earn working at a restaurant.

“It’s a combination of reasons,” Offerdahl said. “No doubt we are up against unemployment that has been artificially increased and stimulus payments that give people opportunity not to show up for work.”

Like many local operations, Summit Restaurant Group hasn’t had a lack of applicants.

“We see a lot of people applying, but not a lot of people showing up for interviews.” said Amber Craig, director of operations at the company, which owns Boru Asian Eatery, Pearl Tavern and three Summit Grill locations.

The Kansas City company is looking for 53 employees — everything from dishwashers to managers. It recently added a $500 sign-on bonus for all full-time hourly workers. It will pay $200 after the employee is with the company for 60 days and an additional $300 after 120 days.

“We’re hoping it will drive some quality applicants who are looking for a long-term home,” Craig said.

Summit plans to open another Third Street Social location south of the Plaza in early June. That location will require the hiring of about 100 more workers.

“We’re going to be in a pickle until September when the current unemployment benefit extension runs out,” Craig said.

The current labor shortage is reminiscent of a pre-pandemic era. With the economy booming and unemployment rates low across the nation in late 2019 and early 2020, restaurateurs here and across the country struggled to hire and retain workers.

“I think it’s worse now than it was in 2019,” said Shawn Barber, who owns Conrad’s Restaurant & Alehouse in Liberty and Stables Local Kitchen & Patio in Kearney.

His restaurants are advertising openings for bartenders, line cooks, sous chef, hosts, dishwashers and managers. Barber said he’s only about 80% staffed so wait lists are running longer than normal. His restaurants have trimmed hours and shut down early on some Sundays to give the current staff a break.

“We would rather have less customers and do a better job with the ones we have,” Barber said. “Our product is about service. It’s about creating an experience.”

ARE WAGES PART OF THE PROBLEM?
At her Northland McDonald’s, Bridget Hughes fields more customer complaints than ever before. A lack of workers makes mistakes more likely and can cause service delays as crew members try to staff multiple stations at the busy restaurant.“I can tell you one thing: the business hasn’t dropped. We’re still getting customers. They’re still getting their money,” she said of McDonald’s, “but the employees are not benefiting.”

Hughes, a 30-year-old shift leader, said the current labor shortage reveals a problem with wages — not with the unemployment system.

“It’s a sad thing to recognize that people are making more at home collecting unemployment than they are going to work,” she said. “The issue is we really need to raise the wages. It’s not that people are lazy. We want to work. We’re workers.”

Hughes is a leader in Stand Up KC, a group of fast-food workers pushing for a $15 minimum wage. She has worked at various McDonald’s locations for 15 years, but has only seen her wages increase from $7.25 to $13 per hour over that time, she said.

She said the best way for restaurants to recruit workers is to raise pay. For instance, she thinks her store would see a flood of applicants if it advertised positions starting at $15 per hour with healthcare benefits and labor union representation.

“Imagine how many people would apply,” she said, “how many would want to come to work every day.”

McDonald’s operators across the Kansas City metro expect to hire more than 4,000 restaurant employees to staff up for the busy summer months.

“We’re all struggling for the last five to 10 employees in our restaurants to get fully staffed,” said Jodi Ward, who owns McDonald’s stores in Kansas City, Independence and Blue Springs.

She said the issue isn’t as simple as raising wages, which in turn could cause prices to rise. At her restaurants, minors may earn the Missouri minimum wage of $10.30 per hour, but most employees are earning above that threshold, she said.

Ward said she’s had to get creative in trying to recruit applicants. She’s posted on Instagram, YouTube and TikTok. And receipts include a number that can be texted to apply for openings.

A shortage of workers can affect service, but Ward said she doesn’t believe in making excuses with customers.

“Sometimes we just do our best,” she said, “because that’s what we can do.”

THE ROLE OF UNEMPLOYMENT
Michael Norsworthy said government restrictions have done two things to hurt the industry’s ability to hire and retain staff. First, its messaging and regulations around the virus scared workers, who feared contracting the coronavirus on the job.

Now, it’s paying people an inordinate amount to stay out of the workforce.

“You have people who are scared and people with pockets full of money,” said Norsworthy, CEO of North Kansas City-based 54th Street Scratch Grill & Bar. “They say, ‘I’m getting $500, $600 a week from the government through September. Why would I want to work and get the same amount of money?”

Weekly unemployment benefits are capped at $320 in Missouri and $488 in Kansas. But those figures were boosted significantly during the pandemic. First, the federal government added another $600 per week for unemployed workers, though that figure is now $300 per week.

Restaurants have been hiring in recent weeks, but not fast enough.

The National Restaurant Association says the industry added 175,800 jobs in March, but employment remains well below pre-pandemic levels.

In Kansas, the number of people working in eating and drinking establishments dropped 7.3% between February 2020 and March 2021. That figure dropped 11.3% in Missouri, where the industry has shed 25,000 jobs in the last year.

The 54th Street chain needs to hire 500 employees at 31 restaurants in four states. But it cannot find workers.

The chain’s first quarter of the year was the strongest and most profitable of its 30-year history. But it could have been better: 54th Street turned down $500,000 in potential business each week because restaurant staff cannot keep up with increased demand.

“It’s a literal bloodbath out there right now,” Norsworthy said. “I have been in this business for 30 years, it has never, ever, ever been this bad to secure employment.”

It frustrates customers, who complain of waiting longer for a table, even when restaurants are only half full.

“I have never been so frustrated in my life,” Norsworthy said. “ We are spending $40,000 a month on advertising for employees.”

As restaurants struggle to bring new people on board, they’ve increasingly invested in their existing workforce.

If an employee leaves there is no one to fill that position, said Josh Pedersen, director of operations at Red Door Grill, which has five restaurants across the metro. “So the focus has to be on taking care of your team.”

With sales now reaching pre-pandemic highs, Red Door Grill has offered overtime to current staff and asked managers to jump in on kitchen prep lines. The company has also doubled its referral bonus program, which is advertised in both English and Spanish. Employees can earn up to $1,000 for helping to bring in a new worker.

“Your best shot at getting new employees is through the team members you already have,” Pedersen says. “Word of mouth is the biggest selling point. That’s how you get guests in the building. It’s no different with team members.”

*******

I checked unemployment numbers in Kansas and they're at about 4 percent. I think a lot of restaurants that had to close last year saw their employees find better money doing something else.



Last edited by Vibiana; 05-04-21 at 12:50 AM.
Old 05-04-21, 03:20 AM
  #39  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Toddarino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Northeastern Wisconsin
Posts: 2,482
Received 177 Likes on 127 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

I work in a food production facility. Every year the company hires approximately five summer help employees. I think the wage is at least $15. This year they can’t find anyone. It’s mostly a lack of applicants. They’ve also had open regular positions that start at $27 that can’t be filled either.
Old 05-04-21, 07:36 AM
  #40  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 7,315
Received 70 Likes on 53 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

The American Suburbs are the problem, plain and simple. I grew up in the suburbs in the 80's and have seen the evolution as it started even way back then. Many parents baby their kids now and shield them from any hardships in their life, as they think they are doing the right thing. In fact, they are doing a disservice to their kids because hardships build character (what doesn't kill you makes you stronger). I saw it when I was in high school as many of my friends simply didn't work because their parents gave them an allowance every week, bought them a car, paid their insurance and gas, so the kids never understood the value of money. Another sense of entitlement by Suburbia is that every kid needs to go to College, as they look down at blue collar work (ironically, all of the parents in my neighborhood that I grew up in came from blue collar jobs). Some kids just aren't College Material and would have been better off finding a trade right out of high school. Instead they wasted 4,5,6 years in college, and that degree was worthless when they finally graduated (and now had a load of student debt that they wouldn't have had if they picked a trade in the first place out of high school). They are now doing those same blue collar jobs they looked down at years earlier. My parents were old school and I had to work in high school because I had to buy my own car, buy my own insurance, by my own gas, and I needed spending money to go out. It wasn't easy as I had a crappy car, but it taught me the value of the dollar, and you can't get everything in life at first. The next generation (Millenials and then GenZ) continue to get worse as the helicopter parents baby them even more, as very few get jobs in high school, yet they all have a car. Now don't get me wrong, there are still some good kids, with old school values drilled in by their parents that work for my company in the summer, but they are the exception not the rule. This is why US Suburbia has an opioid problem, why it's usually a suburban kid who shoots up the school, etc. They have too much fucking time on their hands. If they had a job after school, they wouldn't have time to do drugs and get into other nonsense that leads to trouble. There are positive and negative things about the 'old days' of this country. Old school/hardworking values is the one thing that is slowly dying in this country, and it's happening all over Suburbia.

Last edited by mcnabb; 05-04-21 at 08:18 AM.
Old 05-04-21, 07:53 AM
  #41  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 34,981
Received 587 Likes on 459 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

I won't discount anything mcnabb said, but as the article states, the increased unemployment amount is a big factor. I think it contributes to something like this too:
“We see a lot of people applying, but not a lot of people showing up for interviews.” said Amber Craig, director of operations at the company, which owns Boru Asian Eatery, Pearl Tavern and three Summit Grill locations.
where people need to show they applied to continue receiving benefits. And I think restaurants are hesitant to "temporarily" raise wages to combat this since it's going away eventually, though they may need to do so.

Two other factors:

COVID. I didn't want my kids to go back to school in person until all the adults in the house were immunized. If they are eligible for unemployment and have not been fully vaccinated, I can understand a hesitancy to go back to work until they are.

Also covid related: if you're a restaurant worker (not fast food) dependent on tips, your take home is going to be depressed if the demand in your area isn't there yet. In Los Angeles, for instance, the restaurants just reopened, they are still largely only outdoors only (I'm not sure if that's been lifted) and demand is way down. And then depending on where you live you have to deal with the customers who feel strongly one way or another about masks and everything else under the sun.
Old 05-04-21, 08:26 AM
  #42  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 36,529
Received 368 Likes on 230 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by Vibiana View Post
And three years later, NOBODY wants to work in the restaurant biz.
My answer to these kinds of articles is always "maybe your community can't support your restaurant so you shouldn't have one here." Blaming employees for not wanting to work for sub-minimum wages (because of "tips" ) is backwards - make it worth their while and if you can't because then you can't make enough money, then you can't have your restaurant.
Old 05-04-21, 08:39 AM
  #43  
DVD Talk Legend
 
spainlinx0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: NJ
Posts: 17,096
Received 179 Likes on 103 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

We've tried everything except offering a living wage, and we're all out of ideas!!!! STFU, most restaurant work is brutal.
Old 05-04-21, 08:42 AM
  #44  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
GreenMonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 5,545
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by fujishig View Post
COVID. I didn't want my kids to go back to school in person until all the adults in the house were immunized. If they are eligible for unemployment and have not been fully vaccinated, I can understand a hesitancy to go back to work until they are.

Also covid related: if you're a restaurant worker (not fast food) dependent on tips, your take home is going to be depressed if the demand in your area isn't there yet. In Los Angeles, for instance, the restaurants just reopened, they are still largely only outdoors only (I'm not sure if that's been lifted) and demand is way down. And then depending on where you live you have to deal with the customers who feel strongly one way or another about masks and everything else under the sun.
I wouldn't want to deal with asshole virus infected customers during a pandemic. If I was a teen, I'd be staying home too. Most of what I wanted money for as a teen was social stuff, even a a poor kid - going to the movies with my friends, going to the arcade, D&D books, money for the coffeehouse. I guess there was buying regular books and my car insurance. Not a lot of that stuff going on, at least from rational households. My daughter hangs out with her friend once or twice a week outside at a certain distance, and both of them occasionally have an outside girl scout outing like a hike or whatever. That's about it.

My kids are pushing up on this age (my oldest will be 16 in January). If they were a bit older and had some fastfood job we'd have had them quit - why get your kids, and then possibly you, exposed to the virus for $10-$11/hr or whatever?

I imagine some of this will shake out as vaccine availability goes out and normalcy resumes.
Old 05-04-21, 09:17 AM
  #45  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 36,529
Received 368 Likes on 230 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

My daughter just started working at an ice cream shop a few weeks ago for her first job and has already had to deal with maskholes and shitty customers. She's a pretty tough kid and can shrug it off but if she wanted to quit and not deal with it anymore, I'd understand that too.
Old 05-04-21, 09:52 AM
  #46  
DVD Talk Legend
 
stingermck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 16,026
Received 67 Likes on 52 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by Draven View Post
My answer to these kinds of articles is always "maybe your community can't support your restaurant so you shouldn't have one here." Blaming employees for not wanting to work for sub-minimum wages (because of "tips" ) is backwards - make it worth their while and if you can't because then you can't make enough money, then you can't have your restaurant.
Originally Posted by spainlinx0 View Post
We've tried everything except offering a living wage, and we're all out of ideas!!!! STFU, most restaurant work is brutal.
Allllllll this.
Old 05-04-21, 10:10 AM
  #47  
Suspended
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Living in a van down by the river
Posts: 15,587
Received 218 Likes on 125 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

I have to admit I was especially entertained by the manager whining that they spend 40 grand a month on advertising. Obviously they're not that hard up for cash to raise wages.
Old 05-04-21, 10:20 AM
  #48  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Galt's Gulch
Posts: 2,936
Received 72 Likes on 54 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

I imagine he owns several restaurants and that's an aggregate number, but it definitely seems odd.

Old 05-04-21, 10:43 AM
  #49  
DVD Talk Reviewer/ Admin
 
Adam Tyner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Greenville, South Cackalack
Posts: 23,954
Received 418 Likes on 285 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
I imagine he owns several restaurants and that's an aggregate number, but it definitely seems odd.
Yeah, the article says he's hiring 500 employees at 31 restaurants.

A New York Times article last month touched on some of the same points we've been talking about. Putting one particularly head-turning quote in bold:

Restaurateurs say many former employees are choosing not to re-enter the work force at a time when they can make nearly as much or more by collecting unemployment benefits.
Others have left the restaurant business for better-paying jobs in other fields, further shrinking the pool of possible applicants. Greg Wright, 34, said he decided not to return to his job as a sous-chef at Marlow & Sons, in Brooklyn, soon after the shutdown last March. He has since moved to the Bay Area and started training to become a computer programmer.
Liz Murray, director of human resources and communications for the company that owns Marlow & Sons, said employees have left the company for a variety of reasons. Some moved from New York to their hometowns — and stayed, after finding jobs in restaurants there.

A spokeswoman for Crafted Hospitality, the company that operates the chef Tom Colicchio’s restaurants, said that 80 to 85 percent of the group’s kitchen employees have moved out of New York City.
Many people, though, may be reluctant to take up or return to restaurant work, given the health risks that some studies have linked to serving customers, particularly indoors.
Old 05-04-21, 11:07 AM
  #50  
DVD Talk Legend
 
cultshock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: True North Strong & Free
Posts: 15,311
Received 272 Likes on 196 Posts
Re: Fast food chains understaffed because teens reject jobs there

Originally Posted by spainlinx0 View Post
We've tried everything except offering a living wage, and we're all out of ideas!!!! STFU, most restaurant work is brutal.
Boo-fucking-hoo to restaurant owners, you pay shit salaries for a shit job, it's your own fault that you can't find "quality workers". Cry me a river.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.