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Religion, Politics and World Events They make great dinner conversation, don't you think? plus Political Film

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Old 07-13-17, 06:21 PM   #2301
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Quote:
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Someone isn't a Douglas Adams fan.
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Old 07-17-17, 12:46 PM   #2302
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

http://appleinsider.com/articles/17/...hone-preorders


Quote:
Subway is in the middle of testing a new restaurant design that will make Apple Pay an integral option when ordering food, in some cases before people even walk through the door.




Upgraded locations will have self-order kiosks supporting both Apple Pay and Samsung Pay, the company said on Monday. Once an order is completed, people will be able to claim it at a dedicated pick-up space. The chain does already support Apple Pay, but only for conventional orders.

The pick-up space will also handle preorders made through the company's iPhone app, which is being updated with its own Apple Pay compatibility. Currently mobile users have to manually add a credit, debit, or Subway card.

To further attract a tech-savvy crowd, overhauled restaurants will include free Wi-Fi as well as USB charging ports at seats.




The new design —dubbed "Fresh Forward" —is being tested at a dozen locations worldwide. U.S. restaurants include ones in Chula Vista, Calif., Palmview, Texas, Hillsboro, Ore., Vancouver, Wash., and three Flordia markets: Orlando, Tamarac, and Winter Park.

Canadian pilots are taking place in Quebec, specifically Beauport and Granby. The one U.K. test city is Manchester.

It's not clear when the new store design will emerge from its test phase, but Subway said that "many elements of the new brand identity" will go global by the end of 2017.
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Old 07-19-17, 05:59 PM   #2303
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Quote:
Battle is contentious heading into 2018 midterm elections
Charisse Jones and Kellie Ell
USA TODAY
After her state’s minimum wage rose in January to $9 from $7.50 an hour, Kathy Rondone got an extra $20 a week in her paycheck.
“To me that’s not coffee money or spare change,” says Rondone, an administrative assistant who lives in Augusta, Maine. “It is a set of windshield wipers when mine broke in a storm last February. I had $20 in the bank, and I was able to replace those wipers when I needed them ...
“It’s a really big deal.”
As the nation heads into a midterm election year, a movement to raise the minimum wage continues to pick up steam on the heels of pay hikes that have lifted the earnings of low-income workers from Alaska to Washington, D.C.
Advocates in Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey and Vermont are teeing up campaigns for a $15-an-hour minimum wage in 2018.
“Some of them started to move forward this year, but typically the minimum wage tends to advance in state legislatures in election years,” says Paul Sonn, general counsel at the National Employment Law Project, which researches and advocates on worker pay issues.
With the federal minimum wage at a standstill since reaching $7.25 in 2009, advocates and unions have banded together to boost the earnings of the lowestpaid at the city and state level, arguing that higher
wages shore up finances for low-income families who then fuel local economies with their extra spending power.

The latest efforts come in the wake of low-wage workers in 19 states getting a pay bump at the start of this year, while the minimum wage increased in Oregon, Maryland and Washington, D.C., as of July 1, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Altogether, 31 states, as well as the District of Columbia, have a higher minimum wage than the one set by the federal government, says the U.C. Berkeley Labor Center.

And there has been a wave of wage hikes at the local level, with 39 cities and counties approving increases vs. just five municipalities that had done so prior to 2012, says Ken Jacobs, chair of the U.C. Berkeley Labor Center. House Democrats have proposed raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, but they may not get far. President Trump did say during the election campaign he would support a $10 minimum wage but that the decision should be left up to individual states.
Despite the recent momentum, lifting the minimum wage remains contentious, with some critics saying rapidly rising wages burden businesses and ultimately cost jobs.

In June, separate studies bolstered arguments on both sides. They focused on Seattle. With an initial hike to $11 in 2015, the minimum wage is now as high as $15 for some employees.

A report from the University of Washington concluded that when wages rose to $13 from $11 an hour in 2016 — the second phase of an increase that will ultimately see the minimum wage hit $15 for all workers by 2021 — businesses may have cut the hours of lowwage employees. Those workers logged roughly 9% fewer hours, and saw an average cut in pay of $125 a month, last year.

However, a separate study from U.C. Berkeley that specifically looked at the restaurant industry found the Seattle law led to an increase in the pay of restaurant workers and did not lead to job losses.
Article from this morning's USA today. I do not like the last two sentences. They used the last sentence as a counterpoint to the previous. However it told of people losing hours and pay, not jobs. Then cited a study of restaurants did not lead to job loss. The previous study never claimed that. It claimed that people lost hours and net pay. I would like to see if the second study compared number of hours worked after the wage hike went into effect.
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Old 07-19-17, 09:06 PM   #2304
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

As a flashback counterpoint, here's that sample budget that McDonald's put together a while back to educate their workers on how to scrape by on minimum wage.

The budget expects them to work a second job, pay nothing for heating, somehow get health insurance for $20 a month, and not eat or buy clothing. (There seriously is no allowance for food.) They did eventually update this to spend $50 a month on heating, but I can't quickly find a graphic of that.



$7.25 an hour, now and forever!
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Last edited by Adam Tyner; 07-19-17 at 09:44 PM.
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Old 07-19-17, 09:58 PM   #2305
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

^ I would guess that food would fall under the $800/month ($27/day) spending money.

This seems to assume that you're working two full-time minimum wage jobs, which would average out to a gross income of around $2300 a month. Then you'll get hit with federal taxes, state taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, car taxes, whatever.

So you'll basically be working every waking hour to barely scrape by.

And I'd love to know where they get $20 for health insurance. Looks like some overpaid fuckhead just pulled a bunch of random numbers out of his ass to make them fit a budget.
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Old 07-19-17, 11:25 PM   #2306
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Certainly someone working minimum wage would not pay much if any federal taxes and certainly would qualify for Medicaid with or without the ACA.
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Old 07-20-17, 02:48 PM   #2307
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

$600 for rent. I wonder what imaginary city McDonald's expects its workers to live in.
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Old 07-20-17, 04:28 PM   #2308
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

With a roommate you could easily get a decent place around here for <$600. Living alone would be more difficult unless you didn't mind the not so great neighborhoods.
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Old 07-26-17, 04:35 PM   #2309
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Keeping in mind that the title of this thread is "Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!," I found the bolded part of the article below to highly interesting.

You can raise the minimum wage as much as you want. But you can't fix stupid.


http://www.npr.org/2017/07/25/539183...garette-taxes#

Hidden Brain: How Cigarette Taxes Affect Food Buying

July 25, 2017

A new study shows a connection between cigarette taxes and food stamps. When cigarette taxes go up, smokers end up spending more of their income on cigarettes and that leaves less money for food.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We have news of an unintended effect of sin taxes - you know, taxes on alcohol or cigarettes. Lawmakers reluctant to raise any other taxes do raise those, which seems so worthy - discouraging bad habits or doing something else. NPR social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam is here. Hi, Shankar.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: What happens instead in some cases?

VEDANTAM: Well, in some cases, people do quit or smoke less or cross state lines to buy cheaper cigarettes across other jurisdictions.

INSKEEP: OK.

VEDANTAM: But many people simply pay more to keep smoking. I was speaking with Kyle Rozema. He's an economist at the University of Chicago. And he said that especially for low-income people, the burden can be very high.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

KYLE ROZEMA: High taxes on cigarettes can create financial burdens for low-income households. Take a pack-a-day smoker who makes minimum wage. In the most expensive state in the U.S. - right now, New York - a pack-a-day smoker will spend 30 percent of their income on cigarettes throughout the year. So high taxes can create financial burdens and they can crowd out other expenditures.

INSKEEP: Thirty percent of their income on cigarettes?

VEDANTAM: I mean, it's an astonishing number, Steve. Now, because smokers are spending so much more money on cigarettes, this might mean they have less money for other things, including essentials like food.

INSKEEP: Food, meaning that they might go hungry as a result of this?

VEDANTAM: Exactly. And, in fact, that's where the new research comes in. Rozema and his colleague Nicolas Ziebarth analyzed survey research tracking smoking and non-smoking households. They found something very interesting. State and local jurisdictions that increase cigarette taxes see more households begin to apply for food stamps.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ROZEMA: For the average increase of 56 cents, roughly 7 percent of smoking households who are eligible for food stamps but weren't enrolled respond by taking up food stamps.

INSKEEP: Wait. How do they know that people who smoke are more likely to be on food stamps?

VEDANTAM: There's two ways to test this, Steve. First of all, not all areas of the country raised cigarette taxes, so what the researchers find is it's only in areas that raised cigarette taxes where there's this increase in food stamp usage. And secondly, we see this increase only among smoking households and not among non-smoking households, both of which point to the idea that higher cigarette taxes are leading to increased food stamp usage.

INSKEEP: OK. So I'm trying to figure this out. You've got this addictive behavior. It's very hard to stop. It can be expensive to stop, as a matter of fact. You have people who pay this high state tax but don't have a lot of income so they end up claiming a federal benefit.

VEDANTAM: That's right. Cigarette taxes are largely imposed by state and local jurisdictions but people are claiming a benefit that's largely from the federal government. In some ways, you know, you're robbing Peter to pay Paul.

INSKEEP: It's a revenue transfer.

VEDANTAM: It's a revenue transfer. I mean, Rozema actually said one thing that could be happening is that smokers are saying, the government is taking more money from me, let me take something more from the government.

INSKEEP: Shankar, thanks very much.

VEDANTAM: Thanks, Steve.

INSKEEP: That's NPR's Shankar Vedantam, another habit that's been difficult for us to break. He joins us regularly to talk about social science research. He's also the host of the podcast Hidden Brain.

(SOUNDBITE OF FEW NOLDER'S "FLUTTERY")
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Old 07-26-17, 04:48 PM   #2310
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Statistically lower wage people have a higher rate of smoking.

Just as in physics, in economics, every action has an equal and opposite reaction.
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Old 07-26-17, 05:00 PM   #2311
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Everyone needs an outlet. Pretty sure my straight-edge parents are in a fight club. Or maybe swingers.

I can't speak for other businesses. But I'll never hire below $15/hr anyways. If you hire people and they can't live on your pay, you (as an employer) need to accept all of the baggage that comes with that. You're never going to be able to find a productive employee ... who goes to work, goes home, lives a relatively happy life ... at a non-livable wage.
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Old 07-26-17, 06:03 PM   #2312
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimRochester View Post
Just got back from a trip to Scotland and found some interesting information pertaining to this thread. In the UK like most places outside the US and Canada, they don't tip. Pricing includes the tax and a "living wage". That's not to say they never tip. If the bill is £9.20 you might give them £10 and call it even. I was surprised to find the cost of the food very reasonable. I expected the food to be very high. I did some investigation both through my Googleometer and talking with the people in restaurants. I was surprised at how open they were in telling me what the jobs paid. They really make what we would call minimum wage. £7 - 9 per hour ($8 - $11).

When Gov. Cuomo signed the $15 minimum wage for NY, he used the oft cited examples of the single mother of two trying to raise her kids and go back to school. Or the parents of 4 kids both working 2 jobs to raise their kids and make house payments.

When the UK talks about their "living wage", they are talking about a single person being able to afford a basic flat and basic necessities for themselves. Originally the minimum wage was instituted to avoid exploitation of young workers or immigrants. Somewhere along the way in the states it became something that needed to support a family. This won't change a lot of our discussion. However it will take away the direct comparison of the two systems since the definition of "living wage" is completely different.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troy Stiffler View Post
I can't speak for other businesses. But I'll never hire below $15/hr anyways. If you hire people and they can't live on your pay, you (as an employer) need to accept all of the baggage that comes with that. You're never going to be able to find a productive employee ... who goes to work, goes home, lives a relatively happy life ... at a non-livable wage.
I guess I never realized you were a business owner. What business do you own? How many employees do you have? Ever since my trip to Scotland I'm curious as to other people's definition of "living wage". What do you usually start your entry level or lower skilled workers at?

The only business I ever owned that had employees was the limousine service. Because there were tips, we paid below minimum wage but the drivers made around $15 - $25 an hour with tips and this was from 1990 - 1995. I had a couple part time employees for the phones over the years when I was working and I paid them maybe a $1 or $2 above minimum at the time. But since I was never able to take a salary, it was a take it or leave it situation.
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Old 07-27-17, 10:43 PM   #2313
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

In Seattle, a left wing business owner who supports the city's higher minimum wage says that it caused her to reduce her business's hours, and eliminate some entry level jobs.


https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Societ...-in-the-middle

Seattle's $15 minimum wage debate catches small businesses in the middle

In the deeply liberal city, small business owners acknowledge the benefits of paying workers well. But they worry that their own enterprises won’t survive. Meanwhile, workers are still struggling with rising living costs.

July 27, 2017

Seattle—The posters on display at the entrance to her Capitol Hill store say it all: “You are safe here.” “Black Lives Matter.” “Resist Trump: keep America great.”

“I was raised on the most progressive politics,” says Jon (pronounced “Joan”) Milazzo, who co-owns Retrofit Home, a furniture shop on a busy corner of downtown Seattle. A native Vermonter who moved west about 30 years ago, Ms. Milazzo is all for the idea that employees – especially those at the bottom of the pay scale – receive a fair wage for their work.

But she is straining to reconcile her principles with what’s best for her business. Seattle’s 2015 minimum wage ordinance raises hourly pay by 50 cents to a dollar per year until all companies in the city hit $15 by 2021. Milazzo says she’d be happy to comply – if she didn’t also have to contend with soaring property taxes and rental and utility rates. Instead, she’s condensed her store hours and cut entry-level jobs.

“You can’t just say to the little people, ‘Now pay everybody more,’ ” she says. “Where does it come from?”


Seattle, among the first cities to adopt a $15-an-hour minimum wage ordinance, has been the setting for a debate over the effects of the policy so far. The dispute centers on two apparently conflicting studies, both released this year. One, from the University of Washington, found that the ordinance significantly reduced average earnings for low-wage workers throughout the city because employment opportunities declined. Another, from the University of California, Berkeley, found that job loss – specifically in the food service industry – was minimal, and that wages indeed rose for workers making the least.

The opposing results have driven a deeper wedge between advocates and opponents of the $15 wage. Each side has pointed to flaws in the offending study and used the supportive research to back their cause.

Conversations with those whom the policy affects, however, suggest the issue is not so cut-and-dried. In deeply liberal Seattle, small business owners like Milazzo acknowledge the benefits of paying workers well, both for their employees and the businesses themselves. Still, they worry that their own enterprises won’t survive the rising costs of doing business in the city. Low-wage workers, meanwhile, celebrate the march to better pay, noting that in Seattle even $15 an hour is barely enough to get by. But they recognize that not every company can easily make the change.

Everyone frets about rent.

“Public opinion polls are strongly behind [the $15 minimum wage] and small business polls show they are also in support of it,” says Paul Sonn, general counsel and program director for the National Employment Law Project, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. “They think it’s fair. They’re concerned about inequality. The question is just how do you phase it in.”

'A big difference'

When Jerry Cole talks about his job, a note of quiet pride creeps into his voice. “I’m that person that bags your groceries,” he says, describing his duties as a courtesy clerk at Safeway. “I’m that person that keeps your restrooms clean. I’m the person that brings in the shopping carts when it’s time to get them inside so that when you come in, there’s one available for you.”

For these tasks, which he performs about 30 hours a week, Mr. Cole receives $13.50 an hour. “It’s a big difference,” he says, from the roughly $9 an hour he was making when he started at Safeway five years ago.

For workers like Cole, the policy has meant a tangible improvement in their quality of life. Their experiences support the idea that stagnant wages hurt the economy – and that raising them helps both employers and employees.

Zac Lawrence says he sighed with relief when he received his first bi-weekly paycheck after the city implemented the $13-an-hour phase of its minimum wage hike. “I’m used to hoarding my tips … because you never know if you’re going to have a bad week,” says Mr. Lawrence, who works two restaurant jobs while he tries to build a career in political consulting and outreach. “That was the first time I was getting an actual paycheck and could say, ‘This can pay for half of my rent.’ ”

Now, he says, he feels more secure. And in his neighborhood, populated by service industry workers, business is thriving, he adds. “We have more money to spend,” Lawrence says.

Cole, at Safeway, observes that the policy isn’t perfect. He can see why some employers feel the need to cut back on hours and jobs. “Everyone can’t pay $15, particularly small businesses. I get that,” he says. But as someone who almost never takes a sick day, shares a single-family home with eight other people to save on rent, and runs a landscaping business as a side job just to get by, Cole can’t defend big business keeping wages low.

“We’re still underpaid, quite frankly,” he says, sitting among the books and bric-a-brac that imply shared habitation.
Incentives for everyone

Milazzo, of Retrofit Home, sits perched atop one of her sofas for sale. For years, she says, she and her business partner would hire teenagers at entry level, training them in both the nuts and bolts of the business and a meaningful work ethic.

But as higher rents and rising taxes converged with the new minimum wage policy, Milazzo says she was forced to trim her staff and use fewer resources on training beginners. “The water level was going up all around us,” she says. “So we made that decision. When you come in, you’ve got to have skills.”


Even the most liberal business owners express a sense of being squeezed on all sides.

Felix Ngoussou, an immigrant from Chad who teaches business courses to aspiring entrepreneurs, started out advocating the $15 minimum wage. He preached the benefits of better wages. “People have to have a decent wage so that they can make a living,” he says.

In 2013, Mr. Ngoussou opened a café called Lake Chad in central Seattle. As the minimum wage ordinance took effect, he found himself at a loss for workers. Wage obligations under the Seattle law vary according to business size, and Ngoussou is currently required to pay about $12 an hour.

“People prefer to go drive Uber, go work at Amazon or the airport at $15 an hour, than working in a small coffee shop for $12 or $13,” Ngoussou says. “There are people standing out there saying, ‘Oh if you don’t pay me $15 an hour, I don’t take the job.’ ” Unskilled workers would start at Lake Chad and then, once trained, would hop down the street to Starbucks for its higher wages, tuition reimbursement program, and paid sick and family leave, he says.

“I used to have four to five employees,” Ngoussou says. “Now I don’t have even one.”

Ngoussou has since revised his position: Government should raise wages – but also find ways to control rent and lower taxes for smaller businesses. “We need it to come with a package that offers some incentive to everybody, to small business owners and to employees,” he says.
'A cautionary tale'

Seattleites’ varied experiences with the city’s minimum wage ordinance reflect a key fact that researchers keep coming back to amid the economic theories, political debates, and conflicting studies: There’s still plenty the experts don’t know.

One thing researchers want to explore is how exactly the policy will play out in different cities – and who ultimately reaps the benefits. For instance, “Just because we found that on average workers lose, that doesn’t mean every worker loses,” says Bob Plotnick, one of the authors of the UW paper. If teenagers and retirees are mainly the ones losing low-wage work while heads of household are seeing a net gain in their income, “most people might be OK with that,” he says.

“We think of this as a cautionary tale,” Mr. Plotnick adds. “If a city is going to implement a minimum wage that is substantially above the federal level, it needs to think carefully about what the impacts might be.”
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Old 08-14-17, 10:16 AM   #2314
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

This is from five months ago, but I just found out about it.

Baltimore mayoral candidate Catherine Pugh campaigned in favor of a $15 minimum wage.

However, after she won the election, she vetoed such a bill.

Even if she had signed it, the $15 minimum wage would not have taken effect until 2022, by which time its real value would have been eroded by inflation. And this kind of delay seems to be quite common with the cities that do adopt $15 minimum wages. If a $15 minimum wage is such a good idea, then why wait years for it to take effect, and allow inflation to erode its true value?



http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/mar...324-story.html

Pugh vetoes bill that would raise Baltimore minimum wage

MArch 24, 2017

Mayor Catherine Pugh vetoed legislation Friday that would have raised the minimum wage in Baltimore to $15 by 2022, leaving the measure's future in question.

The council — which next meets on April 3 — would need 12 of its 15 members to vote to overturn the veto. On Friday, the 12-member coalition that originally backed the higher wage began to disband.

Councilman Edward Reisinger of South Baltimore said although he voted to pass the bill, he would not support a veto override. Over the next seven years, the Pugh administration estimated the bill would cost the city $116 million, including the expense of paying city workers a higher minimum wage.

Reisinger said the cost is especially concerning given the city's outstanding fiscal challenges: a $20 million deficit, a $130 million schools budget shortfall and new spending obligations associated with the U.S. Department of Justice's police consent decree.

"The mayor has some very persuasive arguments," Reisinger said. "Baltimore City doesn't have a money tree."

Pugh also was concerned that requiring employers in the city to pay a higher minimum wage could send them fleeing to surrounding jurisdictions. That would worsen unemployment in the city and make it harder for low-skilled workers and ex-offenders to get jobs, she said.

She emphasized that Baltimore's minimum wage is increasing along side the rate statewide. The rate in Maryland will rise to $9.25 on July 1 and $10.10 a year later.

"I believe it is in the best interest of the city that we follow the state," Pugh said.

Pugh said she consulted with ministers, nonprofits, small business owners and elected officials in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford, Howard and Montgomery counties before making her decision.

The City Council voted 11-3 to pass the minimum wage bill Monday. Councilman Brandon Scott also supported the measure but didn't cast a vote because he was traveling overseas.

It is unclear how many of the original supporters also would support a vote to overturn the veto. A motion to override could be made as early as the council's next meeting.

Lester Davis, a spokesman for Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, said historically it has been difficult to override a mayoral veto. Young voted in favor of the $15 minimum wage.

"We don't know if there will be a vote to override," Davis said.

Asked if Young would vote to override the veto if such a vote is held, Davis said: "We're putting the cart before the horse. He obviously has heard the concerns of the mayor. They have prayed about this together.

"He respects her for it and knows she is only coming from a place to putting the overall city first."

Young wasn't available for comment.

Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke of North Baltimore, the bill's sponsor, said she was "very upset and disappointed in a veto response to a very reasonable, balanced proposal."

Clarke said she would work with the bill's supporters to figure out what step to take next.

"Right now, we are thinking, 'we needed the mayor,'" Clarke said. "And she has vetoed this, which is an opportunity to make a major difference in equity across the city.

"It was my hope with the Freddie Gray aftermath and all of our resolutions to do better that we would bring fair wages to the people who built the city, whose lives could have changed for the better. Shame, shame."

Councilman John Bullock of West Baltimore was one of eight new City Council members elected in November, many of whom campaigned on pushing a progressive agenda including a higher minimum wage.

Bullock said he recognizes the complexities of the issue and valid arguments on both sides, but believes that flat wages have been detrimental to the city's lowest-paid workers. He said Pugh's veto wasn't surprising, but disappointing.

"All of us have to think about next steps and see what's feasible," Bullock said.

The pro-business Greater Baltimore Committee's president, Don Fry, praised Pugh's decision. The measure "threatened jobs, made Baltimore an island surrounded by counties with lower business costs and hit the city budget with millions of dollars in higher labor costs it simply cannot afford."

"The decision was no doubt a difficult one for the mayor," Fry said in a statement. "But this shows real leadership as she stayed true to the priority that Baltimore must remain competitive for growth and jobs."

Advocates pushing for the higher wage decried Pugh's action as a broken promise.

"We are deeply upset that Mayor Pugh has broken her campaign pledge by vetoing this legislation, which promises to give tens of thousands of workers higher wages and the opportunity to lead self-sufficient lives," said Ricarra Jones, chairwoman of the Fight for $15 Baltimore Coalition, in a statement.

"As a state senator, Mayor Pugh was a strong supporter of a livable minimum wage and explicitly promised to sign the Baltimore wage bill as mayor. Today, she has made clear that promises are made to be broken. The voters will remember her turn-around."

Jones noted that during last year's campaign, Pugh said she would support a $15 minimum wage bill as mayor on a union questionnaire.

"Yes, I would. I am aware of the current initiative to raise the minimum wage in the City Council to $15 per hour and when it reaches my desk I will sign it," Pugh wrote.


Asked Friday about her response to the questionnaire, Pugh said she has been faced with significant unanticipated expenses since taking office in December, including the schools budget deficit.

"I don't think they make you swear on the Bible," Pugh said. "They ask you if you would support it, and I do support it. But you ask me as a chief executive officer of this city what I would do as it relates to the conditions of the city currently, and where we are economically, I have a right and responsibility to respond on behalf of all of the citizens of this city."


Pugh noted that legislation to increase the minimum wage statewide is before the General Assembly.

"While it may not take place this year or next year, I will follow the lead of the state," she said.
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Old 08-15-17, 03:15 PM   #2315
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

On the subject of robots replacing humans my mimicking their movements.


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Old 08-15-17, 03:21 PM   #2316
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by grundle View Post
This is from five months ago, but I just found out about it.

Baltimore mayoral candidate Catherine Pugh campaigned in favor of a $15 minimum wage.

However, after she won the election, she vetoed such a bill.
Quote:
"I don't think they make you swear on the Bible," Pugh said. "They ask you if you would support it, and I do support it. But you ask me as a chief executive officer of this city what I would do as it relates to the conditions of the city currently, and where we are economically, I have a right and responsibility to respond on behalf of all of the citizens of this city."
I would prefer politicians to respond to issues like she did.

When they don't, we get Trump trying to build a wall just because he said it on the campaign trail.
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Old 08-15-17, 04:06 PM   #2317
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

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Originally Posted by JimRochester View Post
I guess I never realized you were a business owner. What business do you own? How many employees do you have?
It's an industrial supply business. I experimented with as much as eight employees before. It didn't work out (and is my basis for only employing once I can be paying a living wage). Just me right now.

When you pay to little, you inherit all of your underpaid employees problems. That's at least true for small business. When you're McDonald's, you just accept the high turnover rate influenced by your low pay.
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Old 08-23-17, 12:50 PM   #2318
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

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Originally Posted by Troy Stiffler View Post
On the subject of robots replacing humans my mimicking their movements.



The people who work in warehouses won't have to worry about being replaced by that robot.

On the other hand, the people who handle baggage at airports must be terrified.
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Old 08-30-17, 11:24 PM   #2319
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Here's a Podcast from 1A on NPR. Joshua Johnson interviews Nick Hanauer a Venture Capitalist who is somewhere between $100 million and $1Billion in net worth. He wrote and article in Politico called The Pitchforks are Coming. Here's the interview link on the website:

1A - Zillionaire To Other Zillionaires: “Pay Up”

And here's a link to the audio interview. It's about 35 min long:

1A audio link

At one part Hanauer said if the wealth gap continues at its current pace, in 30 years we will be in a Feudal economy. This is a mega millionaire saying this, not some poor guy, or a politician.
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Old 09-25-17, 10:52 PM   #2320
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Wow!

This is pretty huge.


http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...925-story.html

Target to raise its minimum hourly wage to $15 by the end of 2020

September 25, 2017

Target Corp. said Monday that it is raising the minimum wage for its workers to $11 an hour starting next month and then to $15 by the end of 2020.

The company said the move will help it better recruit and retain top-quality staff and provide a better shopping experience for its customers.

The initiative is part of the retailer’s overall strategy, announced this year, to reinvent its business, including remodeling stores, expanding its online services and opening up smaller urban locations.

Target quietly raised entry-level hourly wages to $10 last year, from $9 the previous year, following initiatives by Wal-Mart and others to boost wages in a fiercely competitive marketplace. But Target's hike to $15 an hour far exceeds not only the federal minimum of $7.25 an hour but the hourly base pay at Wal-Mart, the nation's largest private employer, and plenty of its other retail peers whose minimum hourly pay now hovers around $10.

As part of its $2.7-billion investment in workers, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. had raised its entry-level hourly pay for workers to $9 in 2015 and then to $10 in 2016. With Target's outsized influence in the retailing world, its increase could force rivals to match the pay in order to compete.

"We see this not only as an investment in our team but an investment in an elevated experience for our guests and the communities we serve," Brian Cornell, Target’s chief executive, told reporters during a conference call Friday.

Target’s planned minimum-wage increases outpace those mandated by California: Statewide, the minimum wage at medium and large employers is $10.50 an hour, and it’s not scheduled to reach $15 until 2022. Los Angeles, however, already has a minimum wage of $12 an hour at those employers, and the city requires a boost to $15 by mid-2020.

The changes come at a time when there's growing concern for hourly workers. Thousands of workers have staged protests to call attention to their financial struggles and to fight for hourly pay of $15. The November election of a Republican-controlled Congress dampened hopes of an increase in the $7.25-an-hour federal minimum wage. But advocates have continued to press for boosts on the state and local level.

At the same time, competition for lower-skilled workers has heated up, and retailers, likely hobbled by the threat of e-commerce, are falling behind. As shoppers get more mobile-savvy, retailers are seeking sales staff who are more skilled at customer service and in technology, such as using iPads to check out inventory. But with the unemployment rate near a 16-year low, the most desirable retail workers feel more confident in hopping from job to job.

Thirty-two percent of all first jobs in the U.S. are in retail, according to the National Retail Federation, the nation's largest retail group, and stores overall have more job openings now than they did a few years ago.

Hourly pay at restaurants and hotels is up 3.5% from a year earlier, a much better raise than the 2.5% gain for all employees. For workers at transportation and warehousing companies, where e-commerce growth is fueling hiring, pay is up 2.7% in the last year. Retailers, however, have lifted pay just 1.8% in the last year. That may be spurring more workers to leave for better opportunities: Separate government data show the number of retail workers quitting their jobs this year and last is at the highest in a decade.

The average hourly pay for cashiers is now $10.14, according to the Hay Group's survey of 140 retailers with annual sales of at least $500 million. The survey was conducted in May. A year ago, the hourly pay was $9.79.

Target said its minimum hourly wage of $11 is higher than the minimum wage in 48 states and matches the minimum wage in Massachusetts and Washington. It said the pay increase will affect thousands of its more than 300,000 workers, but it declined to quantify the percentage of its workforce. It said the increase to $11 an hour will apply to the more than 100,000 hourly workers that Target will be hiring for the holiday season.

Target declined to say what the average pay will be for its hourly workers with the increased wages.

The Minneapolis company reiterated its third-quarter and full-year profit guidance but said that it would update investors early next year about how the wage investments will affect long-term profits.

Target's wage increases come as the discounter is seeing signs that its turnaround efforts are starting to win back shoppers.

In August, Target reported that a key sales figure rose in the second quarter, its revenue beat Wall Street expectations and its online sales jumped 32%. The increase for the key sales measure reversed four straight quarters of declines. At that time, the company also boosted its earnings expectations for the year. Target is spending $7 billion over three years to remodel old stores, open small ones in cities and college towns and offer faster delivery for online orders. It is also adding more clothing and furniture brands, and said that its children's line, Cat & Jack, brought in $2 billion in sales since its launch a year ago.

Cornell said Target has been moving toward dedicated workers in specific areas such as beauty and clothing, and that the wage increases will only help improve customer experience.

Wal-Mart has been benefiting from its investment in its workers. The Bentonville, Ark., retailer has seen lower turnover among workers and has gotten much better scores by customers for its service. Wal-Mart's namesake U.S. division reported a 1.8% increase in revenue at stores open at least a year during its fiscal second quarter, marking the 12th straight period of gains. Wal-Mart's wage investments, however, did take a big bite out of profits.
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Old 10-03-17, 08:25 PM   #2321
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

Some of these restaurant employees are getting their pay raised to $15 an hour, while others are being replaced with robots.


http://nypost.com/2017/10/02/robots-...w-shake-shack/

Robots are replacing fast food workers at new Shake Shack

October 2, 2017

It’s the future of fast food bytes in the Big Apple.

Robots will replace humans and cash won’t be accepted at a soon-to-open Shake Shack in the East Village, reps for the popular burger chain said Monday.

Customers will place orders via an app and at touch-screen kiosks inside the restaurant, which is scheduled to open an Astor Place branch later this month, according to company CEO Randy Garutti.

Workers dubbed “hospitality champs” will guide diners through possible tech glitches as they place orders at the kiosks, which only accept credit cards.

Diners can also pay on smartphones and tablets using the restaurant’s app.

“The Astor Place Shack will be a playground where we can test and learn the ever-shifting needs of our guests,” Garutti said. “[It] represents our dedication to innovation and to providing the best for our guests and for our teams.”

Buzzers at the burger joint, which was founded by famed restaurateur Danny Meyer, will be replaced by text messages to alert diners when their food is ready.

The new notification model allows customers to roam outside the restaurant while waiting for their burgers, fries and shakes. When their order is ready, they pick it up at a counter.

The chain plans to use the Astor Place branch as a testing ground for the cashless kiosk model, which eliminates the job of cashier. It also gets rid of its traditional order placing area.

Staff at the new restaurant will be paid a minimum of $15 an hour in order to attract the best workers — at a time when areas such as New York, California and DC are transitioning to that as a minimum wage, Garutti said.

In the future, the chain also plans to offer high-speed delivery and innovative packaging, he said.

“We’re excited to lead with kiosk-only ordering, putting control of the Shake Shack experience in our guests’ hands, and an optimized kitchen with increased capacity for mobile orders and eventual delivery integration to support ongoing digital innovation,” Garutti said.

The new Shake Shack will have dining rooms and waiting areas similar to other New York City branches.

Shake Shack isn’t the only restaurant chain that has recently gone cashless.

Sweetgreen, a fast-casual salad chain with locations in Manhattan, stopped accepting cash earlier this year.
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Old 10-03-17, 08:43 PM   #2322
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

In my experience, technology disappoints just as frequently as people. All these changes - I think we're all just juggling disappointment. Stupid people will be engineering these disappointing systems. Might as well have stupid and disappointing people providing the disappointing product/service itself. There's really no baseline for integrity or craftsmanship.

In life, you just have to accept that everything and everyone will disappoint you. And you have to roll with it and accept the disappointment and failure. All this technology is on a hamster wheel.

It's like... I went to the self-serve checkout at Wal-Mart. You start scanning stuff. Their sensors and scale countertop is broken and keeps cutting me off. I look to the cashier, and she looks at me like I'm the asshole. I scan more, and look over, and she's gone. I look around, there's nobody to help me while I'm standing at this stupid self-serve machine. Wal-Mart apparently doesn't give two-fucks about it, as they didn't put an out of order label on it. When that happened, I just left my basket of shit there and walked away. I'll never return to that stupid fucking store again in my life.

This tech ... it's garbage. Companies should be figuring out how to lean up. Companies should be figuring out how to lean up in other areas, so they can provide a competent service to their customers. I can just imagine the bullshit people are going to have to deal with ordering off a kiosk.
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Old 11-05-17, 08:33 AM   #2323
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

What do the people here who support a $15 minimum wage think of these three things?

1) None of the wealthy liberals who claim to support a $15 minimum wage have bought a McDonald's franchises and paid the workers $15 an hour.

2) The $15 minimum wage in most of the cities that adopted it is being delayed for so many years that by the time it does take effect, inflation will have substantially eroded its real value.

3) Hypocrite unions are exempt from the very same minimum wage increases that they support for everyone else in Chicago, Illinois, SeaTac, Washington, and Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, as well as the California cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Long Beach, San Jose, Richmond, and Oakland. Source: http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/mi...rticle/2557806
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Old 11-14-17, 04:54 AM   #2324
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

I wonder how much $15 will be worth in the year 2024.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local...=.ececefe5f5d5

Montgomery County’s $15 minimum wage bill signed into law

November 13, 2017

Montgomery County Executive Isiah Leggett (D) signed legislation Monday that requires a $15-an-hour minimum wage starting in 2021 for businesses with at least 51 employees, and giving smaller businesses a bit more time to implement that wage.

The wealthy county is the first jurisdiction in Maryland, and the second in the region behind the District, to adopt a $15 minimum, which has become a central focus of the progressive movement in recent years. Leaders of the business community oppose the law and say it will put Maryland’s largest jurisdiction at a disadvantage compared to its suburban neighbors.

Advocates are vowing to use the legislation’s passage to renew their push for a statewide $15 minimum, noting that Montgomery is the only suburban U.S. jurisdiction to mandate the wage in a state that has not enacted a similar law statewide.

“In most debates there are gives and takes,” Leggett said Monday at the signing, acknowledging more than a year of back and forth with the council over the timeline for implementing the $15 wage and the definition of small and large businesses. “Montgomery County has done what is right, what is appropriate, and what is reasonable under the circumstances and conditions.”

Leggett, who is finishing the third year of his third and final term in office, said the debate over the bill was one “we should take a great deal of pride in.”

The implementation and economic impacts of a higher wage, however, will fall to Leggett’s successor.

Among the Democrats running for his seat, Marc Elrich (D-At Large) was the bill’s lead sponsor. George Leventhal (D-At Large) was a co-sponsor, and Roger Berliner (D-Potomac-Bethesda) voted in favor of the final bill. State Del. C. William Frick (D-Montgomery) has said raising the minimum wage should be dealt with at the state level.

Two other Democrats running for county executive, David Blair and Rose Krasnow, could not be reached for comment on Monday. Robin Ficker, the only Republican in the race so far, answered questions about the minimum wage by slamming recent tax hikes in the county, and said an increase to $15 an hour may not be enough to offset the tax bite being taken out of people’s paychecks.

In January, Leggett vetoed legislation that would have raised the minimum wage to $15 along a more condensed timeline, saying he was concerned about overburdening businesses and triggering employee layoffs. He then commissioned a study to quantify the impact of a $15 minimum wage, but that study was widely discredited for overestimating the number of local jobs that would be lost.

In September, Leggett proposed changes to a revised minimum-wage bill sponsored by Elrich, calling on council members to expand the definition of small businesses and elongate the compliance timeline.

Last week, the council unanimously approved a compromise between Elrich’s bill and Leggett’s recommendations. Businesses with 11 to 50 employees must pay at least $15 an hour by 2023. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees must pay the wage by 2024.

At a news briefing before Monday’s signing, Berliner said he received frustrated phone calls from local retailers in the wake of last week’s vote.

“There are people that are unhappy,” he said.

Gigi Godwin, president and CEO of the Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce, which testified against the increase in September, said she still has concerns over Montgomery’s competitiveness in attracting businesses, particularly as low-wage jobs are being transformed and replaced by technology.

“What kinds of policies are we putting in place that will attract and retain the employer of the future, who in turn is going to attract and retain the employee of the future?” Godwin asked.

After the signing, Elrich said Montgomery’s bill is more moderate in its timeline than similar legislation in larger cities. He said he was confident business owners would be “creative and smart” in managing their businesses moving forward.

“The truth is, it’s the law,” he said.
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Old 11-14-17, 07:59 AM   #2325
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Re: Fast Food Workers Strike in NYC. What do we want??? $15 an hour!!!

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I wonder how much $15 will be worth in the year 2024.
That generally accepted $8-$10/hr-ish wage has been stuck since the late 80's/early 90's (it was closer to $6/$7 if you go back far enough). While the price of everything else went up. I would hope that people living on those wages see a little prosperity, as the cost of living will slowly go up again over the next 20-30 years.
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