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-   -   The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread (https://forum.dvdtalk.com/religion-politics-world-events/597561-cops-behaving-badly-thread.html)

Nick Danger 01-14-15 06:20 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Three incidents this week in Albuquerque:
Man shoots cop at traffic stop.
Cops shoots man with gun.
Undercover cop shoots two undercover cops.

Dave99 01-14-15 10:23 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
You forgot the part where 2 officers are charged with murder in the shooting of that homeless guy last year.

inri222 01-15-15 10:25 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Sounds like Serpico all over again.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crim...icle-1.2077632

‘If you snitch, your career is done’: Former Baltimore cop says he was harassed, labeled a 'rat' after attempt to root out police brutality

Det. Joseph Crystal witnessed a handcuffed drug suspect beaten and his ankle broken by a fellow Baltimore police officer. When he was compelled to report it to his superiors, the nightmare started. Crystal, now a police officer in Florida, is suing the department over the backlash.

Before he became public enemy No. 1 inside the Baltimore Police Department, Det. Joseph Crystal was considered one of its rising stars.

The son of two NYPD cops, Crystal was put in charge of his police academy cadet class on day one.

He was promoted to detective before he reached his second year on the force.

And he went on to lead his violent crime unit in gun arrests, racking up high-profile collars that made the evening news.

For Crystal, rooting out crime in one of the most violent cities in the nation didn’t even feel like work.

“Being a cop was all I ever wanted to do,” he says. “A dream come true.”

But that dream turned into a nightmare four years ago when his brothers in blue turned on him – bombarding him with taunts and threats, refusing to come to his aid during drug busts and even leaving a dead rat on his windshield.

His crime? He reported a case of police brutality.

Crystal drew the ire of his department after coming forward to report the 2011 beating of a drug suspect by a fellow officer. Crystal’s subsequent trial testimony helped secure convictions against the cop who carried out the beating and the sergeant who helped facilitate it.

Crystal says the pattern of abuse that followed led him to resign from the job he loved.

“I never imagined that doing the right thing as a cop could cost me so much,” Crystal, 31, told the Daily News this week in his most extensive interview to date.

Crystal filed a federal lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department three weeks ago, claiming it failed to protect him from retaliation after he blew the whistle on his fellow officers.

A department spokesman declined to address any aspect of Crystal’s case. “We don’t comment on pending litigation,” said Det. Ruganzu Howard.

Crystal felt like he was on top of the world when he started working for the department in 2008.

The New Jersey native had spent the last six years working for the Coast Guard. He graduated boot camp three days before the 9/11 attacks and then spent more than a week guarding the smoldering site.

The Coast Guard job fulfilled his sense of duty. But it wasn’t until he started working as a cop that Crystal felt like he had found his calling.

He stood out from the start. Crystal was honored with the prestigious Police Commissioner’s Award upon graduating from the academy and was the first member of his class to make detective.

“I was just so motivated,” Crystal said. “All I could think about was this was my shot. I’m going to do it right.”

That conviction would be tested on the night of Oct. 27, 2011.

It was about 8 p.m. when Crystal, along with other members of his Violent Crime Impact Section, witnessed a suspected drug transaction on Baltimore’s east side.

Upon seeing the cops, one of the men, identified as Antoine Green, threw his drugs to the ground and sprinted away. The officers gave chase but Green got away.

Minutes later, a 911 call came in from a woman who reported a man kicked in the back door of her house.

Cops swooped in on the home and arrested Green. After arriving at the scene, Crystal learned that the home belonged to the girlfriend of a city cop named Anthony Williams, who he had never met.

The off-duty Williams showed up after the suspect had already been cuffed and driven away in a police van.

Crystal says he saw Williams have a quick conversation with Sgt. Marinos Gialamas. “I’ll take care of it,” Gialamas told Williams, according to Green.

Moments later, the police van returned and Green was led back into the home.

“I was thinking to myself, ‘What the hell?’” Crystal said. “I was baffled.”

Crystal testified that Williams dragged Green into the back of the house where he began beating the handcuffed suspect.

“I can hear the assault,” Crystal said. “I hear the banging. I hear the guy hit the floor.

“A couple minutes later, they bring the guy out,” Crystal added. “His shirt’s ripped. He’s having trouble standing. Later on, I found out his ankle was broken. It was obvious not just to any cop but to any person that saw it what had just transpired.”

The battered Green was led back into the police van and driven away.

“It was wrong what happened,” Crystal said. “I felt sick about it.”

That night, Crystal called his parents and told them what happened. The two former cops didn’t mince words. “You know what you’re going to have to do,” his mother, Madeline, told him.

“Once you lose your integrity,” said his father, Robert, “it’s gone.”

Crystal didn’t hesitate. He called his sergeant and explained what happened.

Crystal said his superior took the opposite stance from his parents. “If you snitch, your career is done,” Crystal recalled him saying. “Nobody’s going to work with you.”

The young detective couldn’t believe what he was hearing. But it didn’t stop him from reporting the beatdown to prosecutors.

Somehow, word got out immediately. Days after his meeting with prosecutors, Crystal said, a sergeant called him “a snitch” and left a hand-drawn picture of a rat and cheese on his desk.

“I’m not a sensitive guy,” Crystal said. “It didn’t necessarily bother me right away. I said to myself, ‘If this is the worst that happens, I can live with it.’ But from there, it snowballed.”

The guys in his unit refused to ride with him. To his face and behind his back, officers called him a rat and a snitch.

“People don’t like you, and you need to watch your back,” one officer told Crystal, according to his lawsuit.

The harassment escalated after Gialamas and Williams were criminally charged in the assault in Oct. 2012, according to Crystal’s lawsuit.

Out of the blue, a sergeant called him and said: “You better pray to God that you’re not the star witness,” Crystal recalled.

Now officers were no longer backing him up on the streets. On two separate occasions, Crystal said, he called for backup while pursuing drug suspects but nobody showed up.

The second time it happened, Crystal was in the process of arresting a suspected drug dealer and buyer. Suddenly, his supervisor called his cell phone and “gave him a direct order to return to the district and that he would not be given backup," the lawsuit says.

Crystal had no choice but to let the suspects go.

"Nobody wants to ride with you," a detective later told him, according to the suit.

Around the same time, Crystal was told he was being demoted back to patrol.

And his security clearance was inexplicably revoked, forcing him to stop working on an assignment with the FBI.

Instead of going after drug kingpins and gun traffickers, he was put on a midnight-shift burglary detail.

“It was like being kicked in the gut,” Crystal said. “I was shooting through this place with a rocket strapped to my back. Now, because of doing the right thing, doors are slamming.”

Still, nothing could have prepared Crystal for what happened the day after Thanksgiving 2012.

He and his wife returned home to find a dead rat on the windshield of his car. As sickening a sight as it was, Crystal was more bothered by the message behind it: We know where you live.

“I was trying to be strong for my wife because she was hysterical,” Crystal said.

Crystal said he sought help from his union, but an official told him his best option was to find a different department. By that time, Crystal and his wife had moved in with her parents out of fear of retaliation. “It was like I was a cop going into the witness protection program,” Crystal said.

The trial over Green’s assault got underway in Feb. 2014. Crystal testified against both Williams and Gialamas. By that point, he had nothing to lose.

A Baltimore jury found Williams guilty of assault and obstruction of justice and Gialamas guilty of misconduct.

Williams was sentenced to 45 days behind bars. Gialamas received probation. Both men are no longer working for the department, a spokesman said.

"This case was very troubling to this court," a Baltimore judge M. Brooke Murdock said before handing down the sentence to Williams. "The community has a right to expect the police will respect the law."

Crystal had hoped the end of the trial would mark the end of the abuse. He was wrong.

Somebody made a fake Twitter account in his name and started tweeting reporters that he was cheating on his wife. He was bounced around to different patrols and made to feel like a “leper.” And an internal investigation that Baltimore Police Chief Anthony Batts promised would "get to the bottom of what happened to him" went nowhere, Crystal said.

eaten down by the abuse, he resigned from the force in August.

The suit Crystal filed on Dec. 22 seeks at least $2.5 million and names the department, Chief Batts and his former supervisor Sgt. Robert Amador.

“It seems to me that the Baltimore Police Department and any police department across the country needs individuals like Joe Crystal,” said his lawyer, Don Discepolo. “He did stand up for what he thought was right and he was persecuted for it.”

Crystal and his wife now live in Florida where he’s working as an officer with the Walton County Sheriff’s Office.

Crystal understands that some might draw parallels between his case and the coordinated displays of disrespect shown to Mayor de Blasio by NYPD officers at the funerals of slain cops Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos.

But Crystal doesn’t see a connection.

“I see people here as they’re hurting and upset right now at the loss of two of their own,” Crystal said. “I saw what happened to me as somewhere along the line we lost our way.

“What I saw was criminal. What I see here is an emotion,” Crystal added. “And those are two very different things.”

He tried for months to get a law enforcement job near Maryland but found no takers.

“Looking back, I still can’t fathom what happened,” Crystal said. “How do you honestly expect people to have faith, to trust the cops, when they let this happen?”

Dave99 01-15-15 03:38 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
I'd been led to believe there was no blue line, and that while police might not like criticism, they take the high road and still act professionally in spite of that. Am I mistaken?

inri222 01-15-15 03:40 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by Dave99 (Post 12365176)
I'd been led to believe there was no blue line, and that while police might not like criticism, they take the high road and still act professionally in spite of that. Am I mistaken?

Shut up or I'll turn my back to you.

inri222 01-20-15 02:43 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
http://ktar.com/22/1799898/Prescott-...ows-misconduct

Prescott Valley police commander resigns after video evidence shows misconduct

Prescott Valley Police Department commander Arthur Askew has resigned after video evidence showed him removing prescription drugs that had previously been turned in by the public for destruction from the department's drug storage vault.

According to a release from the department, information was received regarding suspicious activity in the department's property and evidence room, prompting the Chief of Police to direct that a motion activated still camera and a covert video surveillance camera be placed in the drug vault.

Video evidence showed Askew removing prescription drugs from the discard box and then leave the vault on two separate occasions.

Askew was reportedly immediately served with a Notice of Investigation and placed on administrative leave, then chose to resign effective Jan. 2, 2015.

Chief of Police Bryan Jarrell contacted the Yavapai County Sheriff's office to conduct a criminal review on Jan. 5. The investigation was submitted for a review of possible criminal charges on Jan. 16. Askew has reportedly cooperated fully.

An internal audit conducted by the department also showed no items from criminal cases were taken.

Prescott police have released the following statement:

"The tragedy of this incident is that a good, honest, decent person became another victim to the power and control of addiction. It illustrates the fact that addiction makes people do things they never would have done otherwise; it does not care who you are or what your profession is.

"This should serve as a reminder to everyone that we must be vigilant to safeguard against the misuse of prescription medications. Everyone from the medical community to the patient must play a role to ensure prescription medications are properly dispensed, properly administered and, if appropriate, properly discarded."

fujishig 01-20-15 02:51 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by inri222 (Post 12370257)
"The tragedy of this incident is that a good, honest, decent person became another victim to the power and control of addiction. It illustrates the fact that addiction makes people do things they never would have done otherwise; it does not care who you are or what your profession is.

"This should serve as a reminder to everyone that we must be vigilant to safeguard against the misuse of prescription medications. Everyone from the medical community to the patient must play a role to ensure prescription medications are properly dispensed, properly administered and, if appropriate, properly discarded."

I wonder if this is how they feel when they book drug addicts.

Also, it's a bit ironic to say that it's a reminder that we need to safeguard against misuse. Isn't the article saying that these are prescription drugs the public gave to the police to be destroyed? Or am I misreading that?

Dave99 01-20-15 04:32 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
I'm pretty sure they still arrest addicts. Odds of an arrest of this guy for theft & possession of controlled substance?

printerati 01-22-15 05:42 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Senators press Holder on police radar that sees inside homes


Radar devices that allow police officers to effectively see into suspects' homes raise "privacy concerns of the highest order," top lawmakers on the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee said Thursday.

At least 50 U.S. law enforcement agencies have secretly equipped their officers with that technology, with little notice to the public or the courts. The devices work like very fine motion detectors, capable of determining whether someone is inside a building by detecting movement as slight as human breathing.

Coupled with the disclosure that federal agents had deployed sophisticated cellphone monitoring tools, use of the radar "raises questions about whether the Justice Department is doing enough to ensure that — prior to these technologies' first use — law enforcement officials address their privacy implications, seek appropriate legal process, and fully inform the courts and Congress about how they work," Sens. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., the chairman and ranking Democrat of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder on Thursday.

They also questioned "how many other new technologies are being used by law enforcement agencies that raise similar privacy concerns."

The letter came after USA TODAY disclosed the use of those devices Tuesday.

Grassley and Leahy asked Holder to brief their staff on the issue by Feb. 13. A spokesman for the Justice Department declined to comment on the letter.

Current and former law enforcement officials said the radar devices can help police officers storm buildings or rescue hostages more safely. But privacy advocates expressed concern about the circumstances in which the devices had been used, and about the fact that agencies had deployed them without public notice.

Contract records show the U.S. Marshals Service began buying the handheld radars, known as the Range-R, in 2012. But their use went largely unknown until more than two years later, when a federal appeals court in Denver revealed that a deputy marshal had used one to arrest a man wanted for violating his parole. The judges expressed concern that the agent had used one without a search warrant, warning that "the government's warrantless use of such a powerful tool to search inside homes poses grave Fourth Amendment questions."

The Supreme Court said in 2001 that the police generally cannot use high-tech tools to determine what is happening inside someone's home unless they have a search warrant.


inri222 01-28-15 11:50 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
States pushing for independent boards to review police misconduct

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...view/?page=all

JimRochester 01-28-15 02:43 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Maybe we should just do away with police and have the army do it then our problems would be solved.

van der graaf 01-28-15 03:27 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Calling Deputy Dave for (local) comment:

http://www.erietvnews.com/story/2794...racist-cartoon


Cop sues police department over racist cartoon

Posted: Jan 26, 2015 11:12 AM PST
Updated: Jan 26, 2015 11:13 AM PST
Jason Sloss

San Diego, CA -- A cartoon more than 100 years old has sparked race allegations and a lawsuit against the city, filed this week by police sergeant Arthur Scott.

According to the lawsuit, the cartoon from the early 1900s was passed out during a police training class in August.

The cartoon, which depicts San Diego's first black police officer Frank McCarter, gives him an ape-like appearance and also takes a racial tone toward Asians.

Sgt. Bryan Pendleton, a leader with the National Black Police Officers Association, also attended the training session with Scott.

"I understood the context the picture was being presented," Pendleton said. "I was somewhat offended, but maybe not to the level Art was. I'm sure there were different degrees of people being offended by it."

According to Scott's attorney, Dan Gilleon, the 10-year SDPD veteran complained about the cartoon after the class and said it should be removed from training materials.

Two weeks later, Scott discussed the issue with Assistant Chief Todd Jarvis.

"At first, the chief tried to defend this cartoon 'this is our first black officer.' Sgt. Scott says, 'no, that's an ape and there's nothing right about this cartoon,'" Gilleon said. "That's when Jarvis sits back in his chair and just stares at my client and ends the conversation. At that point, Sgt. Scott knew that he was going to face this retaliation."

The lawsuit claims 43-year-old Scott was punished for speaking out by forcing him to transfer from the department's Southeastern to Central Division.

slop101 01-28-15 04:06 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Cops butthurt over people using Waze to spot them and avoid tickets.

Fuck 'em. People slowing down due to seeing a cop on an app is no different than seeing them in person. Basically fewer violations are occurring due to expecting a cop to be around the corner. They're just pissed because they're not able to write as many tickets and therefore generating less revenue.

JimRochester 01-28-15 06:51 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
The previous Rochester chief was on the radio this morning and he didn't see any problem with it. He likened it to the old CB radio days of notifying all the other motorists. He said as far as possible harm to cops, he said if you want to do harm, all you have to do is call 911 and they show up.

Josh-da-man 01-28-15 09:01 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by JimRochester (Post 12379084)
Maybe we should just do away with police and have the army do it then our problems would be solved.

That's the problem. The police are becoming a form of military.

Josh-da-man 01-28-15 09:13 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by van der graaf (Post 12379136)

Christ on a badger, what were they thinking?


mike45 01-28-15 09:27 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by Josh-da-man (Post 12379452)
Christ on a badger, what were they thinking?


I can definitely see the problem with the cartoon.

Josh-da-man 01-28-15 11:49 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
I actually think that cartoon is more racist toward Asians than African-Americans.

EinCB 01-29-15 04:45 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
A 17-year-old mentally ill female possibly brandishing a weapon shot multiple times and killed.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/...die/ar-AA8GDtD

http://www.news-journal.com/news/pol...2f2b702ea.html

JimRochester 01-29-15 06:08 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by Josh-da-man (Post 12379543)
I actually think that cartoon is more racist toward Asians than African-Americans.

That's my thought as well

DVD Polizei 01-29-15 08:39 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by Longview, TX Police Department
We were confronted by a white female who threatened us.

I thought I'd NEVER hear that from a police department.





Ok, maybe if Hillary Clinton was in town, but still.

Deftones 01-29-15 08:45 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by the General (Post 12379618)
A 17-year-old mentally ill female possibly brandishing a weapon shot multiple times and killed.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/...die/ar-AA8GDtD

http://www.news-journal.com/news/pol...2f2b702ea.html

so, what are police supposed to do in that situation? stand by and get stabbed? i mean, it's sad that she had mental health issues, but why is it the job of the police to figure out a way to get her help? she's got family. she's got friends. that should be the first line of defense for mentally ill people.

van der graaf 01-29-15 10:15 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by Deftones (Post 12379708)
so, what are police supposed to do in that situation? stand by and get stabbed? i mean, it's sad that she had mental health issues, but why is it the job of the police to figure out a way to get her help? she's got family. she's got friends. that should be the first line of defense for mentally ill people.

I have to agree here. I don't care what your state of "mental stability" is...if you come at me with a weapon with the intent to harm or kill, I'd shoot you, too (if I had a gun...). It's not like the damage done by the knife is less if someone isn't mentally 'right'. :shrug:

Dave99 01-29-15 02:57 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by Deftones (Post 12379708)
so, what are police supposed to do in that situation? stand by and get stabbed? i mean, it's sad that she had mental health issues, but why is it the job of the police to figure out a way to get her help? she's got family. she's got friends. that should be the first line of defense for mentally ill people.

After seeing the video where the first officer had her pinned on the ground and was basically sitting on her, why he didn't just stay there until help arrived to cuff her?

inri222 02-02-15 11:22 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Seattle cop pepper sprays teacher walking home from MLK Day rally [video]

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...icle-1.2096479


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