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-   -   The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread (https://forum.dvdtalk.com/religion-politics-world-events/597561-cops-behaving-badly-thread.html)

inri222 04-11-18 09:29 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Another day and another tough guy doing his thing.

<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FNowThisNews%2Fvideos%2F1896927577064024%2F&show_text =0&width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allowFullScreen="true"></iframe>

inri222 04-12-18 03:34 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
They should make a movie out of this. rotfl

Undercover Detroit police attempt to arrest each other in 'embarassing' drug bust

https://www.upi.com/Undercover-Detro...8361510804710/

inri222 04-17-18 01:52 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Lucky to be alive.


inri222 04-23-18 01:39 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Not...surprising...at...all...


inri222 04-24-18 09:13 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Punk ass mother fuckers. rotfl

<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FWokeFolks%2Fvideos%2F1134293523377662%2F&show_text=0 &width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allowFullScreen="true"></iframe>

andicus 04-25-18 12:04 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
I would've paid $20 US to see him notice something on her vehicle that he could ticket her for. That would've been spectacular.

I'd add that that video should be in the "Cops behaving well" thread. I believe we had something along those lines.

inri222 04-26-18 11:42 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Being in a hospital while black has become a new crime. :sarcasm:

Videos of Hospital Arrest Show Texas Officer Lied to Grand Jury
The videos will likely play a key role in both the lawsuit, and the criminal case

https://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/...477570473.html

wishbone 04-26-18 12:26 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by inri222 (Post 13317596)
Punk ass mother fuckers. rotfl

“No, don’t call me miss, I'm 'Commissioner,' thank you” (Caren) Turner said.

https://i.imgur.com/VEXYKvo.jpg

Baron Of Hell 04-26-18 01:31 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by inri222 (Post 13318760)
Being in a hospital while black has become a new crime. :sarcasm:

Videos of Hospital Arrest Show Texas Officer Lied to Grand Jury
The videos will likely play a key role in both the lawsuit, and the criminal case

https://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/...477570473.html

They attacked a patient that was just released. If he had a more serious problem they could have killed him or put him back in the hospital.

JoeySeven 05-07-18 02:14 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 



An off-duty California police officer pulled a gun on a man whom he accused of stealing Mentos candy at a gas station, according to ABC TV station KABC in Los Angeles.

The man had in fact just purchased the candy, according to surveillance video of the March 16 incident posted by KABC
https://abcnews.go.com/US/off-duty-p...ry?id=54956281

DVD Polizei 05-07-18 02:22 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
In California, of all places. Wow. I thought crime was ok in general over there.

smg669 05-07-18 02:40 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
I see a whole lot more "off-duty" time in that officer's future.

TheBigDave 05-07-18 08:12 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Police Surround Black Women Checking Out of Airbnb Because They Have Luggage
https://lawandcrime.com/video/police...-have-luggage/


STORY TIME: During our time in Cali we have been staying at an Airbnb. The 30th was our second morning and at about 11am we checked out. The four of us packed our bags, locked up the house and left. As you can see 3 of us were Black. About 10 seconds later we were surrounded by 7 cop cars. The officers came out of their cars demanding us to put our hands in the air. They informed us that there was also a helicopter tracking us. They locked down the neighborhood and had us standing in the street. Why? A neighbour across the street saw 3 black people packing luggage into their car and assumed we were stealing from the house. She then called the police.

At first we joked about the misunderstanding and took photos and videos along the way.

About 20 minutes into this misunderstanding it escalated almost instantly. Their Sergeant arrived... he explained they didn’t know what Airbnb was. He insisted that we were lying about it and said we had to prove it. We showed them the booking confirmations and phoned the landlord... because they didn’t know what she looked like on the other end to confirm it was her.. they detained us - because they were investigating a felony charge - for 45 minutes while they figured it out.

https://www.facebook.com/directedbyk...0498802620121/
A lot of people in the comments are blaming the neighbor. But I think she did the right thing. If I knew my neighbor was on vacation, and I saw a bunch of strangers taking stuff out of the house, I'd probably call the cops too.

Seven cars and a helicopter is nuts. Despite the overkill, the cops seemed pretty casual about it.

I'm surprised this isn't a more common occurrence with AirBnB.

slop101 05-08-18 12:50 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
How in the fuck does a cop, a sergeant even, not know what an Airbnb is. Like, how fucking ignorant is law enforcement?

Josh-da-man 05-08-18 08:31 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Airbnb just sounds like a recipe for trouble. Even more than Uber.

Draven 05-08-18 08:42 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by TheBigDave (Post 13327040)
Police Surround Black Women Checking Out of Airbnb Because They Have Luggage
https://lawandcrime.com/video/police...-have-luggage/



A lot of people in the comments are blaming the neighbor. But I think she did the right thing. If I knew my neighbor was on vacation, and I saw a bunch of strangers taking stuff out of the house, I'd probably call the cops too.

If I were that plugged into my neighbor’s schedule, I would call the neighbor before I called the cops.

Mabuse 05-08-18 10:21 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by Josh-da-man (Post 13327257)
Airbnb just sounds like a recipe for trouble. Even more than Uber.

Enjoy that Best Western and the taxi cab. It’s just more Uber and Airbnb for me!

Pro-tip for Airbnb: I don’t know about other parts of the country, but in California you must beware that if you are renting a single family residence in a residential neighborhood the neighbors will most likely HATE you. Nearly every municipality is scrambling to implement rules to curtail short term rentals. In Monterey Airbnb customers arrive to see that neighborhoods have yard signs that say “Just say no to Airbnb!” and stuff. Full time residents know which houses are rental houses and they will fuck with you. Turn that stereo up once and you’ll be talking to the police.

I’d wager $100 that this situation happened because the neighbor fucking hates the owner, and hates the stream of vacationers that spill through the house.

JoeySeven 05-08-18 11:31 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 

Originally Posted by TheBigDave (Post 13327040)
Police Surround Black Women Checking Out of Airbnb Because They Have Luggage

A lot of people in the comments are blaming the neighbor. But I think she did the right thing. If I knew my neighbor was on vacation, and I saw a bunch of strangers taking stuff out of the house, I'd probably call the cops too.

Seven cars and a helicopter is nuts. Despite the overkill, the cops seemed pretty casual about it.

I'm surprised this isn't a more common occurrence with AirBnB.

Let it roll.
Never heard of Rialto, CA.


3 black Airbnb guests questioned by police plan lawsuit
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/...awsuit-n872231

inri222 05-09-18 08:31 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Stop being so greedy, asset seizure is only good when you share it. :sarcasm:

Former Nashville cop stole more than $105K while searching for drugs, investigators say

https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...5-k/581137002/

grundle 05-11-18 03:53 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/illino...-is-legalized/

Illinois Police Threaten to Kill K-9 Dogs if Marijuana Is Legalized
Spoiler:

May 8, 2018

If Illinois legalizes recreational marijuana by ballot measure this November, police may have to "put down" many of the 275 K-9 dogs trained to recognize narcotic substances across the state. Police organizations oppose legalizing marijuana for recreational use, and some marijuana advocates have condemned them for dangling canine death as a political tool.

Police agencies invest thousands of dollars and months of training to teach dogs to sniff out and alert officers to the presence of various illegal narcotics, including marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and other drugs. These dogs, affectionately known as K-9 units, are very specialized, and police insist that it would be "cruel" to retrain them.

If the state legalizes marijuana, "the biggest thing for law enforcement is, you're going to have to replace all of your dogs," Macon County Sheriff Howard Buffett told The Pantagraph. His private foundation paid $2.2 million in 2016 to support K-9 units in 33 Illinois counties. "So to me, it's a giant step forward for drug dealers, and it's a giant step backwards for law enforcements and the residents of the community."

States that have already legalized marijuana have taken various approaches to the K-9 issue. Officers in Washington state have attempted to retrain their animals to ignore marijuana, and trained new police dogs to smell all narcotics besides pot. In other states, agencies have kept pot-sniffing dogs and continued to search for large amounts of the drug not allowed under the law.

Chad Larner, training director of the K-9 Training Academy in Macon County, told The Pantagraph that retraining dogs would amount to "extreme abuse." K-9s are rewarded for successfully identifying the presence of narcotics, and they continue to train regularly with their handlers for a suggested minimum of 16 hours per month. Larner insisted that there is no guarantee the dogs could be broken of their original training.

"We do not want to subject innocent citizens or motorists who travel through Illinois ... to unlawful search and seizures," the director explained. He estimated there are about 275 certified narcotic-detecting K-9s in the state, and that most of them are dual-purpose, trained to find drugs and to track and apprehend suspects and missing persons.

Assistant Police Chief Steve Petrilli of the Normal Police Department told The Pantagraph it would be impossible to teach the dogs to ignore odors they have been trained for years to recognize. Replacing all the dogs would cost millions.

Tragically, Larner said many K-9s are trained not to be social. They have been trained for these specific purposes, and so if marijuana were to be legalized, a large number of police dogs would have to be euthanized.

Dan Linn, executive director of the marijuana advocacy group Illinois NORML, attacked this K-9 argument as a "red herring."

Mabuse 05-11-18 06:22 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
What a bunch of bullshit. There are programs for retired police dogs.

Mabuse 05-11-18 06:25 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Article was bullshit.

https://www.leafly.com/news/politics...tates#dsq-app1

Also, Retired Police K9 Foundation
http://www.policek9help.com

grundle 05-11-18 11:18 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Just because there are retirement homes for those dogs doesn't mean the threat was not made. Here's a more reliable source:


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...?noredirect=on

Illinois police: Keep pot illegal — or we’ll kill the dog
Spoiler:

May 8, 2018

As Illinois lawmakers debate whether to become the 10th state to legalize recreational marijuana, a few law enforcement officials in the state have put forth this bizarre argument:

If Illinois legalizes marijuana for recreational use, law enforcement officials fear job losses for hundreds of officers — specifically, the four-legged kind.

Police agencies spend thousands of dollars and months of training to teach dogs how to sniff out and alert officers to the presence of marijuana, heroin, cocaine and other drugs. If pot use becomes legal, the dogs would likely either have to be retrained — which some handlers say is impossible or impractical — or retired.

“The biggest thing for law enforcement is, you’re going to have to replace all of your dogs,” said Macon County Sheriff Howard Buffett, whose private foundation paid $2.2 million in 2016 to support K-9 units in 33 counties across Illinois. “So to me, it’s a giant step forward for drug dealers, and it’s a giant step backwards for law enforcements and the residents of the community.”
Later in the story, a K-9 trainer suggests some or most of the dogs will need to euthanized.

(By the way, if you think it’s weird that a sheriff would have a “personal foundation” capable of spending more than $2 million on drug dog units for other police departments, so did I. It turns out that Sheriff Buffett is the middle child of the billionaire Warren Buffett.)

There’s a lot to unpack here. First, I’d dispute Buffett’s assertion that legalization is a “giant step forward for drug dealers.” This is true only if you consider retailers who sell marijuana legally to be “drug dealers.” If by “drug dealers” you mean cartels and kingpins who sell the drug on the black market and use violence to settle disputes, legalization is actually pretty bad for them.

But let’s get back to the dogs. Even if it were true that marijuana legalization in Illinois would mean that all drug dogs in the state had to be euthanized, that isn’t an argument to keep marijuana illegal. I’m a dog person. But the drug war is not a make-work program for canines. Second, nine states have already legalized medical marijuana. As far as I know, there hasn’t been mass euthanization of drug dogs in those states. Third, the law enforcement officials in the article argue that even if the dogs aren’t euthanized, they have been very expensive to purchase and train, and replacing them or retraining them to disregard marijuana and alert only to other drugs will be expensive. This, again, is not a persuasive argument for keeping marijuana illegal. The debate is really over whether we should be locking people up over a mostly harmless drug. If it’s wrong to do so, the fact that we’ve already spent a lot of money on a system to enforce a policy we now believe to be wrong is an argument against continuing that policy, not in favor of it. Put another way, if you think marijuana prohibition is justified, then spending money on drug dogs is justified. If you think marijuana prohibition is immoral, how much money we’ve already spent on enforcing that policy has no bearing on whether we should continue spending money on that policy in the future.

But if we are going to talk about cost, do you know what else is expensive? Arresting and jailing people for pot. The Chicago Reader estimated that in 2010, Cook County alone spent more than $78 million arresting and prosecuting people only for possession of marijuana. If we’re really worried about the golden years of drug dogs, that kind of money could purchase them a pretty nice retirement community. I’m thinking bubbling streams, platinum fire hydrants every few feet and a lifetime supply of top-shelf kibble.

But I want to address another part of this story that isn’t getting much attention. I’ve written quite a bit about drug dogs in Illinois, and it turns out they’re pretty terrible at detecting drugs. In 2011, the Chicago Tribune published a review of drug dog searches conducted over three years by police departments in the Chicago suburbs. Just 44 percent of dog alerts led to the discovery of actual contraband. For Hispanic drivers, the success rate dipped to 27 percent. The following year, I obtained the records of an Illinois State Police drug dog for an 11-month period in 2007 and 2008. In nearly 30 percent of cases where the dog “alerted” no drugs at all were found. In about 75 percent of cases, the dog alerted either to no drugs or to what police officers later described as “residue,” which basically means no measurable quantity of a drug and not a significant-enough amount to merit criminal charges. Only 10 percent of the alerts resulted in a seizure of a large-enough quantity of drugs to charge someone with a felony.

This is pretty consistent with statistics from other states, as well as one fascinating academic study, which have shown that drug dogs are far more likely to merely confirm the hunches and suspicions of their handlers than they are to independently detect illicit drugs. The dogs’ high error rates often make them no more accurate than a coin flip. The problem of course is that the entire purpose of the Fourth Amendment is to protect us from searches based solely on a government official’s hunch or suspicion. There’s a reason some legal scholars call drug dogs “probable cause on a leash.”

The K9 trainers I’ve interviewed over the years have told me that drug dogs could actually be trained to only alert when there is a significant quantity of an illicit drug — that is, to ignore “residue.” The reason they aren’t is that police departments don’t want them trained that way. They want dogs that alert as often as possible. They want the dogs to err on the side of false alerts.

Why would police want a dog that falsely alerts? That’s the exact question the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia asked in a drug dog case a few years ago. The answer is incentives. Searches can lead to evidence of other illegal activity. One incentive is that police officers, particular those in drug enforcement, often evaluated based on the raw numbers of arrests. More searches mean more opportunities to make arrests.

But the more important incentive is civil-asset forfeiture. If the police find even the slightest bit of pot, sometimes even just residue, they can often justify taking a driver’s cash, jewelry or even the car itself. The owner of the property — even if completely innocent — then must endure a number of legal and procedural barriers to getting the property back. Take, for example, the K-9 whose records I reviewed several years ago.

In one case, the discovery of 2 grams of marijuana led to the seizure of $5,190 in cash. In another, 2 grams of pot led to the arrest of the vehicle’s seven occupants and seizure of the $2,000 they had between them. In another, 3 grams of marijuana led to 9 arrests and seizure of $2080. In yet another, one motorist caught with 1.2 grams of pot was arrested and forfeited more than $9,000. Another motorist wasn’t arrested, but had more than $2,000 in cash taken from him because the officer found what he says in the report was marijuana residue. It’s unclear if the residue was either subjected to a field test or taken to a lab for testing.
So over 11 months, this drug dog with an error rate of somewhere between 30 percent and 70 percent may have subjected dozens of people to illegal searches, but the pooch also brought in $11,000 for the state police. The dog is, er, a cash cow.

One particularly lucrative part of the state for police is the I-55/I-70 corridor near the town of Collinsville, which brings in a half-million dollars or more per year for local police. A local police officer pulled over Terrance Huff in 2011 while he was returning from a “Star Trek” fan convention. After the dog “alerted,” the cops searched Huff’s car from top to bottom. They found only what they called “shake,” or marijuana residue. K9 trainers who watched the video of the stop say the dog and officer interactions look like a dog that alerted on command, rather than when the dog detected an illicit substance. Huff later sued. During discovery for his lawsuit, he learned that the officer who pulled him over sometimes “trained” his dog by rubbing marijuana on the bumpers of cars parked in motel parking lots. If those cars were to be later pulled over and sniffed — voila! — instant probable cause for a search.

The police in Illinois aren’t worried about the well-being of drug dogs. They’re worried about the well-being of drug cops. Lots of law enforcement jobs — K9 cops, drug task forces, narcotics detectives — depend on the government’s continued pursuit of marijuana. So, too, do the revenue streams of many police departments and prosecutors’ offices. When there’s a threat to that revenue, they’ll do anything to protect it, including making threats to euthanize dogs, or warning that if we dare to stop cops from taking money from people without due process, we’ll soon see headless bodies hanging from bridges.

Illinois cops have been using their police dogs to violate the rights of people living in or passing through that state for decades. If marijuana legalization puts a damper on that practice, that’s a feature of reform, not a bug.

Mabuse 05-12-18 10:56 AM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Where’s KVRDave when we need him?

whotony 05-13-18 09:57 PM

Re: The "Cops Behaving Badly" Thread
 
Anyone follow @shaunking on twitter.

His entire focus seems to,be posting videos of cops and sometimes non police beating and harassing minorities.


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