Religion, Politics and World Events They make great dinner conversation, don't you think? plus Political Film

Special Assistant to President Bush is a Plagiarist

Old 03-01-08, 01:14 PM
  #1  
DVD Talk Hero
Thread Starter
 
JasonF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 39,124
Special Assistant to President Bush is a Plagiarist

Goeglein resigns White House post
Posted on Sat. Mar. 01, 2008 - 06:00 am EDT

By Terence Hunt
of The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A White House official who served as President Bush’s middleman with conservatives and Christian groups resigned Friday after admitting to plagiarism. Twenty columns he wrote for an Indiana newspaper were determined to have material copied from other sources without attribution.

Timothy Goeglein, who has worked for Bush since 2001, acknowledged that he lifted material from a Dartmouth College publication and presented it as his own work in a column about education for The News-Sentinel in Fort Wayne, Ind. The newspaper took a closer look at his other columns and found many more instances of plagiarism.

“The president was disappointed to learn of the matter and he was saddened for Tim and his family,” White House press secretary Dana Perino said in a statement.

She said Goeglein had accepted responsibility and “has apologized for not upholding the standards expected by the president.”

The White House sought deal with the embarrassing situation quickly, the same day the plagiarism was reported by a blogger, Nancy Nall, a former News-Sentinel columnist.

“His behavior is not acceptable and we are disappointed in Tim’s actions,” said White House spokeswoman Emily Lawrimore. “He is offering no excuses and he agrees it was wrong.”

The News-Sentinel said an internal investigation found that 20 of 38 of Goeglein’s columns published in the past eight years contained portions copied from other sources without attribution. Goeglein has submitted unsolicited, or guest, columns to The News-Sentinel for more than 20 years and he has never been paid for them, the paper said.

News-Sentinel editor Kerry Hubartt said the paper would no longer publish Goeglein’s writings.

Goeglein has worked at the White House since 2001. He is a special assistant to Bush and deputy director of the Office of Public Liaison, serving as the administration’s liaison with influential conservatives. He was a right-hand man for former strategist Karl Rove when he oversaw the public liaison office.

Accepting his resignation, the White House gave Goeglein a warm sendoff.

Perino said Bush “has long appreciated Tim’s service and he knows him to be a good person who is committed to his country.”

She said Goeglein helped establish Bush’s Faith-Based and Community Initiative, his program for AIDS relief in Africa, and also played an important role in the confirmation of Supreme Court Justices John Roberts and Samuel Alito.

Lawrimore said the White House press office was unaware that Goeglein was writing a column. “He recalls that he informed someone in the White House press office earlier in the administration,” she said.

Nall posted a comparison of Goeglein’s work with an essay by Jeffrey Hart in the Dartmouth Review.

Goeglein’s column said this:

“A notable professor of philosophy at Dartmouth College in the last century, Eugene Rosenstock-Hussey, expressed the matter succinctly. His wisdom is not only profound but also worth pondering in this new century. He said, “The goal of education is to form the citizen. And the citizen is a person who, if need be, can re-found his civilization.

“He meant that, I think, in quite a large sense. He did not mean that you had to master all the specialties you can think of, but rather to be an educated man or woman, you needed to be familiar with the large and indispensable components of our civilization.

“This does not mean you should not study other cultures and civilizations. It does mean that to be a citizen of this one, you should be aware of what it is and where it — we — came from. It can hardly be challenged that the United States of America is part of the narrative of European history.”

Hart’s essay said this:

“A notable Professor of Philosophy at Dartmouth, Eugene Rosenstock-Hussey often expressed the matter succinctly, `The goal of education,’ he would say, `is to form the citizen. And the citizen is a person who, if need be, can re-found his civilization.’

“He meant that in quite large a sense. He did not mean that you had to master all the specialties you can think of. He meant that you need to be familiar with the large and indispensable components of your — this — civilization.

“This certainly does not mean that you should not study other cultures and civilizations. It does mean that to be a Citizen of this one you should be aware of what it is and where it came from. It can scarcely be challenged that the United States is part of the narrative of European history.”
http://newssentinel.com/apps/pbcs.dl...NEWS/803010302

I find it funny that this real plagiarism scandal has errupted so soon after the attempt to gin up a fake plagiarism scandal in the Democratic race.
JasonF is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 01:19 PM
  #2  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,443
I find it neither funny nor interesting. Kick him to the curb.

Last edited by Th0r S1mpson; 03-01-08 at 01:26 PM.
Th0r S1mpson is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 01:28 PM
  #3  
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 3,236
This is the next step if gays are allowed to marry. It's a slippery slope, my friends.
Pistol Pete is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 01:34 PM
  #4  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Working for Gizmonic Institute
Posts: 10,430
His next stop? Writing for the New York Times.

The Times Plagiarizes the Miami Herald
A Page One story lifts two lines about an illicit drug.
By Jack Shafer
Posted Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008, at 12:14 PM ET
New York Times story.

The hell wrought on Argentina by the illicit drug "paco" has already become a journalistic staple. The Christian Science Monitor visited the topic on April 5, 2006; the Miami Herald on Aug. 12, 2006; the Los Angeles Times on May 25, 2007; and BBC News on Aug. 29, 2007.

The New York Times' contribution arrived on Feb. 23 and was published on Page One of the paper. But not only does the Times piece fail to advance the paco story, it plagiarizes two lines from the Herald.

Here's the relevant section from the Herald story, published 18 months ago, with the portions purloined by the Times italicized:

Paco is highly addictive because its effect is so short—a couple of minutes—and so intense that many users resort to smoking 20 to 50 cigarettes a day to try to make its effects linger. ...

Paco is even more toxic than crack cocaine because it is made mostly of solvents and chemicals, with just a dab of cocaine, said Jim Hall, executive director of Up Front Drug Information Center, a Miami nonprofit that has been tracking cocaine abuse for more than two decades.

Now, from the Times story, similarly marked:

Paco is highly addictive because its high lasts just a few minutes—and is so intense that many users smoke 20 to 50 paco cigarettes a day to try to make its effects linger. Paco is even more toxic than crack cocaine because it is made mostly of solvents and chemicals like kerosene, with just a dab of cocaine, Argentine and Brazilian drug enforcement officials said.

I discovered the plagiarism while considering the Times article as a candidate for my "Stupidest Drug Story of Week" series. The unsourced assertion that paco was highly addictive because its high is short-acting struck me as suspicious nonsense. Plenty of drugs are short-acting without being highly addictive. A few Nexis stops later, I found the Herald piece.

Times Managing Editor Jill Abramson says that the piece's author, Alexei Barrionuevo, concedes that he lifted the two passages. Barrionuevo had been working on the paco story for a couple of weeks and realized at the end of the process that he needed definitional passages about the drug to distinguish it from crack cocaine. She says that instead of consulting his notes, which he claims contained the information, he relied on Google. Indeed, a copy of the Herald story can be found via Google.

Barrionuevo doesn't specifically recall taking the lines from the Herald story, says Abramson, but he doesn't dispute that it's very likely his source was the newspaper.

Did Barrionuevo commit plagiarism?

"Yes," says Abramson. "I think when you take material almost word-for-word and don't credit it, it is." Like most employers, the Times doesn't discuss internal personnel issues. Citing this policy, Abramson declines comment on whether a reprimand is planned.

A Times Editors' Note about the incident is in the works, she says.
From Slate
crazyronin is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 01:48 PM
  #5  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,443
Ctrl + C.

Ctrl + V.

Look out, I'm <i>dangerous</i>.
Th0r S1mpson is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 07:04 PM
  #6  
Moderator
 
Groucho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 70,585
In a related story, the Obama campaign has welcomed him with open arms.
Groucho is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.