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Free Burma!

Old 09-29-07, 12:08 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by DVD Polizei
It is up to the people to fight back. They need to coordinate, and begin to section off parts of the burma police (bait them in small areas of the city where small amounts of forces would come in, and just take them out, and overwhelm them with hidden resistance pockets. Sounds easy typing this I know. Obviously, they can't fight one-on-one as their enemy has superior firepower.

This is how terrorism starts.

These people need to back off, because it's a no win situation at the moment. But time is on their side. They need fake a retreat, then a few weeks later, overwhelm parts of the government by complete surprise with any tactic at their disposal.

Just like Iraq, it's up to the people to make a change. We can't change it for them, and the UN being there certainly wouldn't help. It would just postpone the problem.

Having no intervention could actually bring a better outcome. Freedom and Liberty don't come on a platter with UN or US troops. Nope. Yah gotta fight for it. Americans have. And many other countries have experienced the same.
Normally I would agree with this 100% but this is a different situation. The people are already fighting as much as they can. The can't have weapons - even being caught with a weapon can have the most severe of penalties there. All they can do is disobey the government and that is what they are doing. They were told not to protest and not to group in large groups and they have ignored that and continued on.

The only hope for them is to convince the military to turn against the government. Such a thing is certainly possible since the monks are revered in that country. Pressure from the people in the country to the military and pressure from the UN with sanctions is the only hope to resolve this situation.
Old 10-03-07, 12:02 PM
  #27  
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It's a bloodbath over there unfortunately.
Old 10-03-07, 11:57 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by General Zod

The only hope for them is to convince the military to turn against the government. Such a thing is certainly possible since the monks are revered in that country. Pressure from the people in the country to the military and pressure from the UN with sanctions is the only hope to resolve this situation.
China opposed a simple SC resolution that condemned the government crackdown on the grounds that the demonstrations and killings in that military-run country were a "domestic" dispute that does not warrant international condemnation. (Translation: We're covering our ass for the "domestic" disputes in Tibet). They would probably veto sanctions.
Old 10-04-07, 02:07 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by General Zod
Normally I would agree with this 100% but this is a different situation. The people are already fighting as much as they can. The can't have weapons - even being caught with a weapon can have the most severe of penalties there. All they can do is disobey the government and that is what they are doing. They were told not to protest and not to group in large groups and they have ignored that and continued on.

The only hope for them is to convince the military to turn against the government. Such a thing is certainly possible since the monks are revered in that country. Pressure from the people in the country to the military and pressure from the UN with sanctions is the only hope to resolve this situation.
Well, you're right. I will admit I don't know a lot about this situation. If simply taking out the leader would be effective, then I'm for it. But occupying is a bad idea. A UN force is a bad idea.

The military certainly will not turn against the government, because from what little I know, they are heavily tied with drug dealing--regardless of political alliance. They are not going to simply give up their rather rewarding lifestyle for shitty wages if they take out their own leader. So, you have a high involvement of corruption which is also a major part of the picture here, which will need to be offset if an invasion or occupation occurs.

And I don't think we need the US to write another blank check. 51 million people and they can't take out their own leader, then well, I guess they don't have enough people who are pissed off enough.

They aren't allowed to own weapons? Then make the motherfuckers.

I'm tired of other countries needing help and just expecting the US to come to their aid. We need to instill an independence rather than a codependence.

This really is THEIR problem. I think if we let countries deal with their own stinking mess themselves, their countries would become stronger and more respective, than corrupt and filthy leaderships which are sucking the monetary tits of the US and other nations helping them.
Old 10-04-07, 02:38 PM
  #30  
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Yup, the only countries which have real leverage on Burma are China, India, and Russia because of oil, weapons and nuclear reactor deals. While they might issue statements which urge the government to exercise restraint, what they really mean is that they don't want the situation to escalate and produce instability in the country. Unfortunately, when it comes to humanitarian issues, those pesky self-interests always seem to get in the way...

Last edited by eXcentris; 10-04-07 at 02:41 PM.
Old 10-05-07, 06:16 PM
  #31  
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Burma was well on its way to becoming a rich Asian tiger economy.

But then the government put an end to that!


http://www.voanews.com/english/2007-10-04-voa10.cfm

'Burmese Way to Socialism' Drives Country into Poverty

By Kate Woodsome

04 October 2007

Burma is rich in natural resources, yet one of the poorest countries in the world. Very little of the revenue goes to the people. Instead, the funds are keeping the country's military leaders in a life of luxury. Kate Woodsome at VOA's Asia News News Center in Hong Kong explains how Burma's money is being spent.

Burmese citizens were shocked when a video of the wedding of Senior General Than Shwe's daughter found its way into public markets and onto the Internet last year. The video shows a portly bride adorned in diamonds and emeralds. Military police are shown escorting wedding guests out of luxury vehicles into a banquet hall decorated with grand bouquets, tray after tray of delicacies, and a five-tiered wedding cake.

Min Zaw Oo, a Burmese activist now living in Washington, says it was the first time the general population saw the stark difference between the people and their leaders.

"In Burmese culture, Burmese expect their leaders to sacrifice. So when they see a leader of the regime as having this wedding ceremony with all these jewelries, the Burmese people are really angry, not just only because that broke the norms and values of a leader, but also they compare themselves with those people getting rich under this system," said Min Zaw Oo.

In contrast to the opulence shown in the video, most of Burma's 50 million people struggle to feed their families on less than $1 a day. Malnutrition is widespread, and the HIV infection rate is high. Only about three percent of the country's budget is spent on health care.

The country is one of Asia's poorest, and its government one of the most repressive in the world. But when the government sharply raised the price of fuel in August, tens of thousands of citizens were desperate enough to take to the streets to protest. Last month those demonstrations were stopped with deadly military force.

Burma was not always so poor. Fifty years ago, it was known as the "rice bowl of Asia" - one of the region's richest countries. But the prosperity started to fade in 1962, when leaders of a military coup implemented a plan called the "Burmese Way to Socialism."

Sean Turnell of the Burma Economic Watch at Macquarie University in Australia says the military generals nationalized everything - from major enterprises down to the local corner store.

"After that, Burma begins to sink into deepest poverty as this agenda, this Burmese Way to Socialism, gradually dismantled all of the institutions you need to run a functioning market economy,"
he said.

Turnell says over the past four decades, military leaders have mismanaged Burma's economy by combining a rigid, Soviet-type of central planning with superstitious beliefs.

"In 1987, a round of demonetization took place where they just declared whole units of the legal currency no longer legal tender and they replaced them by currencies based on the number nine," continued Turnell. "The reason for that was astrologists had told the leading general at the time that the number nine was especially auspicious for him.

He says the military leaders have little formal education and are often advised by astrologists. This has led to spending sprees, like the construction of a new multi-billion-dollar capital in the jungle town of Naypidaw. The move from the old capital, Rangoon, began two years ago at 6:37 a.m. - a time recommended by an astrologer.

The spending is funded by Burma's resources - minerals, gems, natural gas and lumber. It is also the world's second largest producer of opium poppies, and has a growing amphetamine trade.

Burma's gas flows to neighboring Thailand. Its other neighbors - China and India - are competing with South Korea for access to offshore gas fields. France's Total and U.S. oil giant Chevron also are in on the trade.

Regional analysts say most of that revenue and money earned on the black market goes straight to the military leaders and the elite that surrounds them.

In the 1990s, the government embarked on a self-promotional campaign and renovated key architectural and religious sites. But Burmese activists say that was its last notable public contribution.

In recent years, the country's earnings have helped enlarge and modernize the military with weapons and equipment from China and India. Last year, members of the military and civil servants were treated to a substantial pay raise.

Earlier this year, Burma purchased a nuclear reactor from Russia. The government says it will be used to produce medical isotopes for use in cancer treatments.

Ian Holliday, a Burma expert at the University of Hong Kong, says the generals also spend their money in Singapore.

"I know they've got some property investments. Than Shwe and his family have a luxury villa that they go [to]. I don't know how much money they put in Singaporean bank accounts. I assume it's quite a lot," he said. "There's certainly substantial Singaporean investment in Burma, so I think Singapore would have no problem with Burmese putting their money there."

In response to last month's bloody crackdown on the anti-government protests, the U.S. reinforced its economic sanctions on Burma's leaders. And the European Union strengthened sanctions of its own. Holliday says the measures will not be very effective.

"Things like freezing the assets of named senior members of the government that are held in the U.S. - there are almost no assets that the generals have in the U.S. And nobody from the European Union is thinking of investing in Burma right now," he said. "The consumer reaction would be so extensive, and the country's just so toxic."

Analysts say the only thing that could turn Burma's economy around is a split in the military leadership. Until then, they say, there will be no end to the spending sprees.
Old 10-06-07, 12:06 AM
  #32  
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Yeah, autocratic military police states will do that.

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