Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Other Talk > Religion, Politics and World Events
Reload this Page >

Just one in 1,000 people could name all five First Amendment freedoms.

Religion, Politics and World Events They make great dinner conversation, don't you think? plus Political Film

Just one in 1,000 people could name all five First Amendment freedoms.

Old 03-01-06, 10:30 AM
  #1  
Political Exile
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 16,032
Just one in 1,000 people could name all five First Amendment freedoms.

This is quite scary.

But at least when it comes to understanding the Constitution, I'm in the top 0.1%!

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11611015/

D’oh! More know Simpsons than Constitution

Study: America more familiar with cartoon family than First Amendment

March 1, 2006

CHICAGO - Americans apparently know more about “The Simpsons” than they do about the First Amendment.

Only one in four Americans can name more than one of the five freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment.

But more than half can name at least two members of the cartoon family, according to a survey.

The study by the new McCormick Tribune Freedom Museum found that 22 percent of Americans could name all five Simpson family members, compared with just one in 1,000 people who could name all five First Amendment freedoms.

Joe Madeira, director of exhibitions at the museum, said he was surprised by the results.

“Part of the survey really shows there are misconceptions, and part of our mission is to clear up these misconceptions,” said Madeira, whose museum will be dedicated to helping visitors understand the First Amendment when it opens in April. “It means we have our job cut out for us.”

The survey found more people could name the three “American Idol” judges than identify three First Amendment rights. They were also more likely to remember popular advertising slogans.

It also showed that people misidentified First Amendment rights. About one in five people thought the right to own a pet was protected, and 38 percent said they believed the right against self-incrimination contained in the Fifth Amendment was a First Amendment right, the survey found.

The telephone survey of 1,000 adults was conducted Jan. 20-22 by the research firm Synovate and had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Editor's note: The five freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment are freedom of speech, religion, press, assembly and petition for redress of grievances.
grundle is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:33 AM
  #2  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Posts: 68,522
I know that Red Dog can quote the Commerce Clause verbatim.
classicman2 is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:35 AM
  #3  
Moderator
 
wendersfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Nuova Repubblica di Salò
Posts: 32,361
Originally Posted by classicman2
I know that Red Dog can quote the Commerce Clause verbatim.


I honestly don't know if I could remember the petition for redress of grievances part without being prompted. It would probably depend on how sober I was.
wendersfan is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:38 AM
  #4  
Admin-Thanos
 
VinVega's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Caught between the moon and NYC
Posts: 31,102
Bread and Circuses Imperator, Bread and Circuses. That's how you control the masses.
VinVega is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:39 AM
  #5  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: not CT
Posts: 9,615
There is a bit of overlap in the layman's interpretations of the freedoms which make it less simple to reason through. One could reasonably argue that in a literal sense the freedom of press would be covered by the freedom of speech, the freedom of assembly may have and impact on the freedom of religion, and the petition of grievances takes a little of both speech and assembly.

I imagine that for most it's usually a bit harder to think of a group of semi-synonomous items than to identify 5 unique but related ones.
BigPete is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:40 AM
  #6  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 25,062
Originally Posted by wendersfan


I honestly don't know if I could remember the petition for redress of grievances part without being prompted. It would probably depend on how sober I was.
I couldn't remember the exact wording, but I knew the concept was in there. I can also name the five members of the Simpson family. What do I win?
Tracer Bullet is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:41 AM
  #7  
Moderator
 
wendersfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Nuova Repubblica di Salò
Posts: 32,361
Originally Posted by TracerBullet
I couldn't remember the exact wording, but I knew the concept was in there. I can also name the five members of the Simpson family. What do I win?
I can name the starting lineup of the '69 Orioles, but that doesn't mean I'm asking for a handout.
wendersfan is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:41 AM
  #8  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Posts: 68,522
One could reasonably argue that in a literal sense the freedom of press would be covered by the freedom of speech, ,,
You'd piss-off the press if you argued that. They believe they're 'special.'
classicman2 is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 10:43 AM
  #9  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,443
Not surprising in the least, and not a priority. I'd rather people in this country learn logic and common sense before learning their first ammendment rights.
Th0r S1mpson is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 11:13 AM
  #10  
DVD Talk Hero
 
JasonF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 39,135
Everyone's missing the real issue here -- apparently, I don't have the Constitutional right to own a pet!? Did you guys know about this?

Also, the government makes us register our pets. Given that we don't even have a Constitutional right to own pets, I can only think this is the begining stages of a government program where they seize all of our pets. Remember, when schnauzers are outlawed, only outlaws will have schnauzers!
JasonF is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 11:58 AM
  #11  
bhk
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Right of Atilla The Hun
Posts: 19,749
Wait a minute, The Right Not to Be Offended isn't in there?
bhk is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 11:59 AM
  #12  
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 86,200
HA! It's a trick question. There is only 1 First Ammendment freedom. Those people all feel like idiots now.
kvrdave is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 12:05 PM
  #13  
DVD Talk Hero
 
JasonF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 39,135
Actually, there are about 7 or 8 First Amendment Freedoms. What this article describes as Freedom of Religion is really two freedoms -- Free Exercise and Freedom from Establishment. There's also the Right of Association and the Right to Travel, both of which have been held to be implicit in the First Amendment. Plus, there's at least one case that says the Right of Assembly and the Right to Petition the Government are really the same right.

And, of course, the Right to Privacy -- hey, look at all the worms that just came out of that can!
JasonF is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 01:21 PM
  #14  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Democratik People's Republik of Kalifornia
Posts: 22,995
Me think this is scarier.

http://www.boston.com/news/nation/ar...acking_skills/

College students lacking skills
Literacy study cites trouble with tasks


By Ben Feller, Associated Press | January 20, 2006

WASHINGTON -- Nearing the end of their degree programs, most college students cannot handle many complex but common tasks, from understanding credit card offers to comparing the cost per ounce of food.

Those are the sobering findings of a study of literacy on college campuses, the first to target the skills of students as they approach the start of their careers.

More than 50 percent of students at four-year schools and more than 75 percent at two-year colleges lacked the skills to perform complex literacy tasks.

That means they could not interpret a table about exercise and blood pressure, understand the arguments of newspaper editorials, compare credit card offers with different interest rates and annual fees, or summarize results of a survey about parental involvement in school.

The results cut across three types of literacy: analyzing news stories and other prose, understanding documents, and having math skills needed for checkbooks or restaurant tips.

''It is kind of disturbing that a lot of folks are graduating with a degree and they're not going to be able to do those things," said Stephane Baldi, the study's director at the American Institutes for Research, a behavioral and social science research organization.

Most students at community colleges and four-year schools showed intermediate skills, meaning they could perform moderately challenging tasks. Examples include identifying a location on a map, calculating the cost of ordering office supplies, or consulting a reference guide to figure out which foods contain a particular vitamin.

There was brighter news.

Overall, the average literacy of college students is significantly higher than that of adults across the nation. Study leaders said that was encouraging but not surprising, given that the spectrum of adults includes those with much less education.

Also, compared with all adults with similar levels of education, college students had superior skills in searching and using information from texts and documents.

''But do they do well enough for a highly educated population? For a knowledge-based economy? The answer is no," said Joni Finney, vice president of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, a nonpartisan group.

''This sends a message that we should be monitoring this as a nation, and we don't do it," Finney said. ''States have no idea about the knowledge and skills of their college graduates."
Myster X is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 01:29 PM
  #15  
Moderator
 
wendersfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Nuova Repubblica di Salò
Posts: 32,361
Originally Posted by bhk
Wait a minute, The Right Not to Be Offended isn't in there?
I think everyone here has waived that right.
wendersfan is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 01:33 PM
  #16  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Posts: 36,980
"That means they could not ... understand the arguments of newspaper editorials"


who can?
Venusian is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 02:00 PM
  #17  
Political Exile
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 16,032
Originally Posted by BigPete
There is a bit of overlap in the layman's interpretations of the freedoms which make it less simple to reason through. One could reasonably argue that in a literal sense the freedom of press would be covered by the freedom of speech, the freedom of assembly may have and impact on the freedom of religion, and the petition of grievances takes a little of both speech and assembly.

I imagine that for most it's usually a bit harder to think of a group of semi-synonomous items than to identify 5 unique but related ones.
Yes. You raise an excellent point.

I knew the 5 simply because I have read the first amendment so many times.
grundle is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 02:03 PM
  #18  
Political Exile
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 16,032
Originally Posted by JasonF
Everyone's missing the real issue here -- apparently, I don't have the Constitutional right to own a pet!? Did you guys know about this?

Also, the government makes us register our pets. Given that we don't even have a Constitutional right to own pets, I can only think this is the begining stages of a government program where they seize all of our pets. Remember, when schnauzers are outlawed, only outlaws will have schnauzers!
My city requires a dog license for every dog.

I had my dog for 12 years, until she died of old age. I never got a license for her.

I got her all her necessary vaccinations. Food. Water. Toys. Lots of exercise. Collar I.D. tags with my name, address, and phone number.

A license would have served no legitimate purpose.
grundle is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 02:06 PM
  #19  
Political Exile
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 16,032
Originally Posted by Myster X
Me think this is scarier.

http://www.boston.com/news/nation/ar...acking_skills/

College students lacking skills
Literacy study cites trouble with tasks


By Ben Feller, Associated Press | January 20, 2006

WASHINGTON -- Nearing the end of their degree programs, most college students cannot handle many complex but common tasks, from understanding credit card offers to comparing the cost per ounce of food.

Those are the sobering findings of a study of literacy on college campuses, the first to target the skills of students as they approach the start of their careers.

More than 50 percent of students at four-year schools and more than 75 percent at two-year colleges lacked the skills to perform complex literacy tasks.

That means they could not interpret a table about exercise and blood pressure, understand the arguments of newspaper editorials, compare credit card offers with different interest rates and annual fees, or summarize results of a survey about parental involvement in school.

The results cut across three types of literacy: analyzing news stories and other prose, understanding documents, and having math skills needed for checkbooks or restaurant tips.
That makes me wonder how they graduated college in the first place.
grundle is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 02:08 PM
  #20  
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 86,200
Originally Posted by Myster X
Me think this is scarier.
I have a hard time believing a lot of these. I think it is mainly because I have heard that learning is worse "today" than in the past for the past three decades, yet if it were entirely true, we would all be wearing diapers again.
kvrdave is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 02:11 PM
  #21  
Moderator
 
wendersfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Nuova Repubblica di Salò
Posts: 32,361
Originally Posted by kvrdave
I have a hard time believing a lot of these.
I don't. I work in higher ed.
wendersfan is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 02:20 PM
  #22  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 25,062
Originally Posted by wendersfan
I don't. I work in higher ed.
My boyfriend is a TA and teaches college freshman, so I get to read whatever papers I want. Let me tell you, most of them would scare you.

Last edited by TracerBullet; 03-01-06 at 02:23 PM.
Tracer Bullet is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 04:02 PM
  #23  
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 86,200
Originally Posted by wendersfan
I don't. I work in higher ed.


But look at the results. There are a lot more people in the US today than there were in the 1950s. There are a lot less "low tech" jobs as a percentage (like manufacturing) than there were in the 1950s. So we must be filling the demand for jobs, right? We've got more doctors, lawers, and PHDs right now than we did in the 1950s, as well as engineers. To me that just doesn't compute with the idea that we are dumber than ever before.
kvrdave is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 04:04 PM
  #24  
bhk
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Right of Atilla The Hun
Posts: 19,749
To me that just doesn't compute with the idea that we are dumber than ever before.
Of course it does, Reading and Writing 101 was a second year course at my medical school.
bhk is offline  
Old 03-01-06, 04:43 PM
  #25  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 122,530
Is anyone honestly surprised by this?
Red Dog is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.