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Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Old 04-13-19, 04:02 PM
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Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

I don't know if anyone's interested, but I thought this thread could be a repository for creepy, unexplained tales, images, videos, etc. I don't think such a thread already exists here.

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Just wasting time last night, browsing with no destination in mind, I happened upon the mystery of the "Yuba County Five", which I had never heard of, and I'm sure most here haven't either.
On Feb. 24, 1978, returning home from a basketball game in Chico, Ca., five intellectually disabled (actually four; the fifth had schizophrenia) men from Yuba City drove, for reasons unknown, into the desolate mountains of Plumas National Forest. They left their fully-functional car on a snowy mountain road and set off on foot into the forest. What happened exactly is unknown, but the bodies of four of the five men were found in June. The fifth man, the schizophrenic, was never located, but most who have examined the case strongly believe he also perished up on the mountain, and doubt he was responsible, at least maliciously, for the deaths of the others. Some speculate he might have suffered a schizophrenic episode, which caused the others to run into the woods. Oddly, the keys to the car were never found.
Three of the bodies were found in different places along the service road leading to Daniel Virk Campground, while a fourth was found inside a Forestry Service trailer at the campground. Found in or next to the trailer was plenty of gas for heating, and enough victuals for all five men to have survived there for a year. Very little of the canned food was touched, and nary of the dried provisions, and the dead man in the trailer had lost 80-100 lbs of his body weight and had several weeks of beard growth, so investigators concluded he might have lived as long as three months before succumbing to hypothermia. His feet were frostbitten and almost gangrenous. He was wrapped tightly in a blanket, such that it was improbable for him to have wrapped himself.

Here's a well-penned Washington Post article on the case, written about a month after the bodies were found

Spoiler:


5 'Boys' Who Never Come Back
By Cynthia Gorney
July 6, 1978

There was a half moon that night, a winter moon in a cloudless sky. Up in the mountains above the Feather River, the snow-drifts sometimes rose to 15 feet.

"You need a coat," Ted Weiher's grandmother had said, watching him go.

"Oh, Grandma, I won't need a coat," Weiher had said. "Not tonight."

Two hours before midnight last Feb. 24, when the basketball game ended at the California State University at Chico, five young men from the flatlands 50 miles to the south climbed into a turquoise and white 1969 Mercury Montego and drove out of the parking lot. They were fans of the visiting team, which had won. They stopped three blocks away at Behr's Market, mildly annoying the clerk (who was trying to close up), and bought one Hostess cherry pie, one Langendorf lemon pie, one Snickers bar, one Marathon bar, two Pepsis and a quart and a half of milk.

Then they walked out of the store, got back in their car, drove south out of Chico and disappeared.

Ted Weiher's woke up afraid, at 5 the next morning. She cannot say what woke her up, except that maybe the Lord decided it was time to end her one last night of solid sleep. Ted's bed was empty.

The house was still and it was not quite light and this is how the horror began, as it often does: no crash, no wailling, just a dim morning chill in a small house on what ought to be an ordinary day.

Imogene Weiher got on the phone and called Bill sterling's mother as fast as she could.

Juanita Sterling had been up since 2 a.m. "Bill didn't come home either," she said.

Mrs. Sterling had already called Jack Madruga's mother. Jack also had not come home. Mrs. Weiher called Jackie Huett's mother and Mrs. Weiher's daughter-in-law walked down the street to talk to Gary Mathias' stepfather. All five friends had vanished. At 8 that evening, Mrs. Madruga called the police.

The boys had never done such a thing before.

They were men, really, not boys - Huett was the youngest, at 24, and Weiher was 32 - but their families called them boys, our boys. They lived at home. Three of the five had been diagnosed retarded; Madruga, although undiagnosed, according to his mother, was generally thought of as slow, and Mathias was under drug treatment for schizophrenia, a psychotic depression that first appeared five years ago and that his doctor says had not resurfaced for the past two years.

They were supposed to play a basketball game of their own on Feb. 25, part of a tournament, with a free week in Los Angeles if they won. Their clothes had been laid out the evening of the 24th, before they left for Chico - each had a beige T-shirt, the words "Gateway Gators" emblazoned across the chest, from the Yuba City vocational rehabilitation center for the handicapped where they all played basketball. Weiher had asked his mother to wash his new white high-topped sneakers for the tournament (he had scuffed them while trying them out); Mathias had just about driven his mother crazy with the game. "We got a big game Saturday," Mathias kept saying. "Don't you let me oversleep."

Saturday came and went and no word came. The police began to take interest. On Tuesday, Feb. 28, they found Madruga's Mercury, and from that day on nothing they found, nothing anybody told them, seemed to make any sense.

The car was 70 miles from Chico, on a deserted and rut-ravaged mountain road. It had stopped at the snow line, and although its tires had apparently spun, the car was not really stuck; five men easily could have pushed it free. The gas tank was a quarter full. Four maps, including one of California, lay neatly folded in the glove compartment. The keys were gone, but when police hot-wired the car the engine started immediately.

Both seats were littered with the wrappers of the food bought at Behr's. Everything had been eaten except the Marathon bar, which was half gone.

And the car's underside was undamaged. This heavy American car, with a low-hanging muffler and presumably with five full-grown men inside, had wound up a stretch of tortuously bumpy mountain road - apparently in total darkness - without a gouge or dent or thick mudstain to show for it. The driver had either used astonishing care and precision, the investigators figured, or else he knew the road well enough to anticipate every rut.

The families say only Madruga drove that car, ever. And the families say Madruga, who disliked camping and hated the cold, did not know that road.

None of the boys knew the road, as far as anybody could tell. Once about eight years earlier, Bill Sterling had gone fishing with his father at a cabin not far away, but he had not enjoyed himself and had stayed home the few times the Sterlings went back. Three years ago Weiher had hunted deer with friends in the Feather River country, but it was quite a way west of the area where the car was found, and his family says he was not keen on the forest either. With the exception of Mathias, who occasionally stayed out all night with friends, each of the lost men led mostly stay-at-home lives of such scheduled predictability that no one could fathom what - or who - might have taken them up that lonely road in mountains. The Deserted Trailer

A storm whistled in the day the car was found, dropping nine inches of snow on the upper mountain. The search teams nearly lost men themselves two days later, as their Snow-cats struggled through the drifts. Nobody found anything, not so much as a shoe, unti lafter the spring thaw, when on June 4 a small group of Sunday motorcyclists wandered into a deserted forest service trailer camp at the end of the road and inhaled a nau-seating smell.

It was Ted Weiher, stretched out on a bed inside the main 60-foot trailer, frozen to death. Eight sheets had been pulled over his body and tucked around his head. His leather shoes were off, and missing. A table by the bed held his nickel ring with "Ted" engraved on it, his gold necklace, his wallet (with cash inside.) and a gold Waltham watch, its crystal missing, which the families say had not belonged to any of the five men.

Weiher had been a tall, heavy-set follow back in February - 5 feet 11, 200 pounds. By the time his body was found he had lost from 80 to 100 pounds.His feet were badly frostbitten. The growth of beard on his face showed that he had lived apparently, in starving agony inside that trailer, for anywhere from eight to 13 weeks.

He was 19.4 miles from the car, Weiher, wearing a striped velour shirt and lightweight green pants, had walked or run, or been somehow taken in the moonlight through almost 20 miles of 4-to-6-foot snowdrifts to reach the locked trailer where he died.

The trailer had been broken into through a window. No fire had been built although matches were lying around and there were paperback novels and wood furniture that would have burned easily. More than a dozen C-ration cans from an outside storage shed had been opened and emptied - one had been opened with an Army P38 can opener, which only Madruga and Mathias who had served in the Army, probably knew how to use - but no one had opened a locker in the same shed containing enough dehydrated Mexican dinners and fruit cocktails and assorted other meals to keep all five alive for a year.

No one had touched the propane tank in another shed outside, either. "All they had to do was turn that gas on," says Yuba County Lt. Lance Ayers, "and they'd have had gas to the trailer, and heat."

All though the spring, the search for the boys had practically consumed Ayers. He had gone to Marysville High School with Weiher and his brothers, although he had not known them well, and there was something about this silent disappearance of five strong men that haunted him like nothing he had ever investigated. Leads were drifting in from all parts of the country. The boys had been seen in Ontario; the boys had been seen in Tampa; the boys had been seen entering a movie theater in Sacramento accompanied by an older man. Ayers could punch holes in all of them. Skeptical but desperate, the consulted psychics: One told him the boys had been kidnapped to Arizona and Nevada; another said the boys had been murdered in Oroville, in a two-story red house, brick or stained wood, with a gravel driveway and the number 4723 or 4753.

For two solid days Ayers drove every street in Oroville, looking for that house. It did not exist.

Before long he could rattle off their names and vital statistics almost automatically. Theodore Earl Weiher, brown eyes, curly brown hair, handsome beer-bellied, friendly in a trusting child's way (he waved at strangers and brooded for hours if they did not waveback); got a good chuckle out of phoning Bill Sterling and reading from newspaper items or oddball names from the telephone book; employed for a while as a janitor and snack bar clerk but quit at the urging of his family, who thought Weiher's slowness was causing problems. Jackie Charles Huett, 24, 5 feet 9, 160 pounds, slight droop to the head, slow to respond, a loving shadow to Weiher, who looked after Huett in a protective sort of way and would dial the phone for him when Hyett had to make a call. Jack Antone Madruga, 5 feet 11, 190 pounds, high school graduate and Army veteran, brown eyes, brown hair, heavy-set, laid off in November from his job as a busboy for Sunsweet growers. William Lee Sterling, 5 feet 10, 170 pounds, dark brown hair, blue eyes, Madruga's special friend, deeply religious, would spend hours at the library reading literature to help bring Jesus to patients in mental hospitals. Gary Dale Mathias, 5 feet 10, 170 pounds, brown hair, hazal eyes, 25, assistant in his stepfather's gardening business. Army veteran with psychiatric discharge after drug problems that developed in Germany five years ago.

By late spring Ayers was dreaming about the boys at night. Once he woke in the darkness, arms outstretched: He had almost embraced all five.

"You do a lot of handshaking." Ayers says. "And a lot of drinking." Whistling Noises in the Night

Then there was the man who saw lights on the road. Joseph Shones, 55, told police he drove his Volkswagen bug up that same road sometime after 5:30 the evening the boys disappeared. He said he was checking the snow line, because he wanted to bring his wife and daughter up that weekend. His car got stuck in the snow just above the snow line - about 50 yards beyond the place where the Mercury would be found - and as Shones was trying to free his car, he said, he had a heart attack. (Doctors later confirmed to investigators that Shones had indeed suffered a mild heart attack.)

Shones lay in the car with engine on and the car heater going, he said. Sometime in the night, he heard what he described as whistling noises a little way down the road, and he got out of his car. What he saw looked like a group of men and a woman with a baby, he said, walking in the glare of a vehicle's headlights. He thought he heard them talking. Shones said he yelled for help, but the headlights went out, and the talking stopped.

Shones got back into his car and lay down again, he said. Sometime later, maybe a couple of hours, he saw lights outside his car window - flashlight beams, he said. Again he called for help.The lights went out and whoever was out there went away. Shones said he lay in the car until it ran out of gas, and then while it was still dark he walked back eight miles to the lodge called Mountain House, where he had stopped for a drink before heading up the road. Just below his Volkswagen, in the place where he had heard the voices, he passed the Mercury Montego sitting empty in the middle of the road.

The day after Weiher's body was discovered, searchers found the remains of Madruga and Sterling. They lay on opposite sides of the road to the trailer, 11.4 miles from the car. Madruga had been partially eaten by animals and dragged about 10 feet to a stream: he lay face up, his right hand curled around his watch. Sterling was in a wooded area, scattered over about 50 feet. There was nothing left of him but bones.

Two days later, just off the same road but much closer to the trailer, Jackie Huett's father found his son's backbone. Ayers had tried to talk him out of joing the search, fearing something like that might happen, but Huett, whose first name is Jack, had insisted on going. There were a few other bones around, along with Jackie's Levis and ripple-soled "Get Theres" shoes. An assistant sheriff from Plumas County found a skull the next day, about 100 yards downhill from the rest of the bones. The family dentist identified the teeth as those of Jackie Huett.

Huett's remains had lain northeast of the trailer, like Sterling's and Madruga's. Northwest of the trailer, about a quarter mile away, searchers found three wool forest service blankets and a two-cell flashlight lying by the side of the road. The flashlight was slightly rusted and had been turned off. It was impossible to tell just how long it had been there.

They found no sign of Gary Mathias.

His tennis shoes were inside the forest service trailer, which suggested to investigators that he might have taken them off to put on Weiher's leather shoes - particularly since Weiher had bigger feet, and Mathias' feet might have swollen with frosbite. But that was pure conjecture, which was all they had.

State mental institutions have received a description of Mathias - slender, dark-haired, double vision without his glasses. He was not carrying his billfold when he left the house for the Chico basketball game, so he had no identification on him, and if he is still alive he has been without the drugs he needs for the last four months.

Mathias took his medicine weekly, as he had for at least three years - stellazine and cogentin, both used in the treatment of schizophrenia. His family says the illness appeared five years ago, while he was in the Army in Germany. Police records show he had become violent on occasion - he was charged with assault twice - and there was a difficult period, after his return from Germany, when Mathias would fail to take his drugs and lapse into a disoriented psychosis that usually landed him in a Veterans Administration hospital. "Went haywire," is how Bob, his stepfather, puts it.

For the last two years, though, Mathias had been working steadily in his stepfather's business and was taking his medication so faithfully that a local doctor who knows Mathias well calls him "one of our sterling success cases." He collected Army psychiatric disability pay, was enormously attached to his family, loved the basketball games he shared with the other four men and listened to the Rolling Stones and Oilvia Newton-John on the record player in the living room. Klopf says his stepson took his medicine the week he disappeared. But he and the doctor say Mathias had not "gone haywire" in two years.

"What I looked for all the time I was up there were his glasses," says Klopf. "I didn't think the bear would eat that."

He is sitting at his dining room table. His voice is gruff. He is tired of reporters and tired of the pain and tired of not understanding what happened to the boy. Ida Klopf, across the table from him, says she had not turned on her television in weeks because she does not want to find out that way. She says she is going back up there on the weekend, back up to see if she can find something the searchers missed.

"There's no place to look, Ida," says Klopf.

"I'll find someplace," Mrs. Klopf says, turning her face away. A Thousand Leads

"Bizarre," says John Thompson, the special agent from the California Department of Justice who has joined Ayers on the investigation. "And no explanations. And a thousand leads. Every day you've got a thousand leads."

They learned that a forest service Snowcat ran up the road to the trailer on Feb. 23, leaving a packed path in the snow that the boys might have followed.

They took on a water witcher from the town up north called Paradise, who said the he had fixed it so his divining rod would pick up traces of human minerals and then led the searchers to a deserted cabin near the abandoned car.

They found a gray cigarette lighter, the disposable plastic kind, about three-quarters of a mile northwest of the trailer. The families said none of the boys carried lighter.

They found that gold watch beside Weiher's body.

They discovered that Gary Mathias knew people in Forbestown, which is about halfway between Chico and Yuba cities, on a road with a turnoff so easy to miss that anybody driving it late at night might have ended up heading north, toward the mountains, and lost.

But none of it helped. The cabin-found by the water witcher was empty, the cigarette lighter might have been dropped by a hiker, the watch might have belonged to a forest ranger in the trailer mouths earlier, and Mathias' friends in Forbestown said they had not seen him for a year.

And suppose they followed the Snowcats' tracks. Suppose that was how Weiher made it through 20 miles of deep snow. Why?

Why abandon a perfectly operable car to strike out into the forest at midnight?

Why press on through 20 miles of snowdrifts and darkness to break into a lock, unheated trailer and die?

Why drive all the way up there in the first place? And how? If someone chased them, why was the car undamaged? What were the whistling noises and the voices Shones heard on the road?

It doesn't add up.

"There was some force that made em go up there." Jack Madruga's mother Mabel says firmly. "They wouldn't have fled off in the wood like a bunch of quail. We know good and well that somebody made them do it. We can't visualize someone getting the upper hand on those five men, but we know it must have been."

"They seen something at that game, at the parking lot," says Ted Weiher's sister-in-law. "They might have seen it and didn't even realize they seen it."

"I can't understand why Gary would have been that scared," says Klops.

Even a fire, he says, "All those paperbacks and they didn't even build a lousy fire. I can't understand why they didn't do that unless they were afraid."

But he cannot imagine what they were afraid of. Neither can the investigators. They can't prove there was foul play and they can't explain it if there wasn't.

They don't even know if Gary Mathias is died. They think he is. They think his body probably lay on the snow until the spring thaw came and eased him down, deep inside some thick green patch of mountain manzanita.

There are also several extensive Reddit discussions on the case, the most informative of which is probably this one: https://www.reddit.com/r/UnresolvedM...g_men_abandon/
This case discussion involves much speculation because the men's actions at all junctures of their fateful trek were illogical and inexplicable. That's also what makes it fascinating and haunting.
Photo of the five:

Below is a contemporary map of key locations. Remember, after the game, their known intention was to head back home to Yuba City. One of my initial theories is that perhaps they missed the turnoff south to Yuba, and, since they were low-functioning to begin with, and excited after the game, might have become increasingly frantic, everything spiralled out of control from there.
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Old 04-13-19, 05:30 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

I've never heard this story, but yeah, it's really interesting. I approve of this thread.
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Old 04-13-19, 05:55 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

That reminds me a bit of all the weird shit surrounding the Dyatlov Pass Incident.
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Old 04-13-19, 06:05 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

These type of stories fascinate me. I had never heard of the Yuba city case, but probably the logical explanation is that "mentally disabled" people do unpredictable things, and are not subject to following the same rules of living as non mentally-defective people are. Things that seem strange and inexplicable to us have perfectly "rational" explanations to one who suffers from schizophrenia. Probably these five were simply incapable of dealing with the novel life survival situation which resulted, and so perished of 'mysterious' causes that are really not too mysterious given their mental incompetence.

Another fascinating case, which I'm sure many have heard about is the mystery of the Mary Celeste, a similar case of abandonment and mystery.

The most fabulous mystery to me is the Black Dahlia case in Los Angeles of 1947. Police corruption, graft, and intentional obfuscation existed in the LA Police far, far before the OJ Simpson scandal almost 50 years later. A lot was covered up and the case remains "unsolved" today, though dozens of books have been written about the case.
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Old 04-13-19, 08:38 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

This one always peaks my curiosity.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event

Description

The Tunguska event was a large explosion that occurred near the Stony Tunguska River in Yeniseysk Governorate, Russia, on the morning of 30 June 1908. The explosion over the sparsely populated Eastern Siberian Taiga flattened 2,000 square kilometres of forest, yet caused no known human casualties.
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Old 04-13-19, 09:21 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

^Fascinating occurrence. Thanks for posting.
Originally Posted by cultshock View Post
I've never heard this story, but yeah, it's really interesting. I approve of this thread.
Incidentally, I love the topical Russell quote in your signature. At least, I think I do; I'm uncertain.
Originally Posted by Tom Banjo
That reminds me a bit of all the weird shit surrounding the Dyatlov Pass Incident.
Yes, very reminiscent. In fact, the Reddit thread is titled "The American Dyatlov Pass".
Originally Posted by zyzzle
These type of stories fascinate me. I had never heard of the Yuba city case, but probably the logical explanation is that "mentally disabled" people do unpredictable things, and are not subject to following the same rules of living as non mentally-defective people are. Things that seem strange and inexplicable to us have perfectly "rational" explanations to one who suffers from schizophrenia. Probably these five were simply incapable of dealing with the novel life survival situation which resulted, and so perished of 'mysterious' causes that are really not too mysterious given their mental incompetence.
Sure, except that it's such a succession of bad decision-making, as to be almost impossible to believe:
-Several wrong turns led to them driving into the mountains, which should have looked wrong even to them. Where they were going (home), there were no mountains.
-Then they abandoned the car for no apparent reason. It had a quarter-full tank of gas and was unscathed except for its being stuck in 10 inches of snow, from which, it was determined, the five of them could have easily pushed it free.
-A motorist, Joseph Schones, who was having a mild heart attack in his car nearby (as if the story isn't crazy enough without this little nugget), saw the men up the road and called out for help. He said at the time he thought there was a young woman and child with them. This has led some to question whether foul play of some sort was involved, but I highly doubt it in light of how they were discovered. They had no possessions of value and all died of hypothermia, not through overtly murderous means.
-Then they left the main road and entered a circuitous series of service roads, which is about the worst thing they could have done.
-Whoever arrived at the cabin, whether it was all five or just a couple of them, could have easily survived with the sustenance and copious heat-creating supplies that were available to them.

There are just too many bizarre elements to this case. I'd be very interested to know how this all went down.
Another fascinating case, which I'm sure many have heard about is the mystery of the Mary Celeste, a similar case of abandonment and mystery.
Yes, I have a vague familiarity with that case. It sure leaves one scratching one's head.
The most fabulous mystery to me is the Black Dahlia case in Los Angeles of 1947. Police corruption, graft, and intentional obfuscation existed in the LA Police far, far before the OJ Simpson scandal almost 50 years later. A lot was covered up and the case remains "unsolved" today, though dozens of books have been written about the case.
That Hodel fellow continues to beat the drum for the notion that his father did it. Not only that, but that his father was both Cleveland's never-caught Kingsbury-Run (Torso) Killer and the Zodiac. These claims strain credulity, though I do believe it is highly possible he was the Dahlia killer.
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Old 04-13-19, 09:57 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

The odd story of Boston Mills, Ohio aka Helltown. The government evicted everyone living there during the 1970s over likely toxic material left after local strip mining, but lots of odd stuff going on.

Investigating the Real Story Behind Ohio?s Helltown: Legends, Lies, and Lost Truths
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Old 04-13-19, 10:04 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Originally Posted by Norm de Plume View Post
^Fascinating occurrence. Thanks for posting.

That Hodel fellow continues to beat the drum for the notion that his father did it. Not only that, but that his father was both Cleveland's never-caught Kingsbury-Run (Torso) Killer and the Zodiac. These claims strain credulity, though I do believe it is highly possible he was the Dahlia killer.
*

Yes, I'll give it 10 to 1 odds that George Hodel did the deed, based on his very nefarious activities as an abortionist and his medical training in surgery (at what is now UC Sanfrancisco!), and the fact the hemicorpectomy was performed with such surgical skill. I'll draw the line at Hodel's son "inventing" the Zodiac and other crimes, though. I've personally communicated with Steve Hodel, and he seems to be diligent, though flawed in his later attributions of his father's misdeeds. But the original book he wrote in 2003 about the case pretty much rings true. Particularly annoying is that the LAPD refused to run DNA evidence tests on some of the paraphernalia that Hodel wanted to have analyzed to seal the case against George Hodel... So, this basically means that LAPD was complicit or at least screwed up and will not admit to its botching the case. Similar to OJ in 1994...
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Old 04-13-19, 10:34 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

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Old 04-13-19, 11:07 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

^^

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-expressionless/
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Old 04-13-19, 11:23 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Originally Posted by Deadman31 View Post
This one always peaks my curiosity.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_eventDescription

The Tunguska event was a large explosion that occurred near the Stony Tunguska River in Yeniseysk Governorate, Russia, on the morning of 30 June 1908. The explosion over the sparsely populated Eastern Siberian Taiga flattened 2,000 square kilometres of forest, yet caused no known human casualties.
Such a massive explosion, I'd guess body parts would be pulverized and at that time, probably wouldn't even know if it was a tree limb or a body part. I guess it's possible nobody lived in that 2K sq/m area. But finding body parts in that type of explosion would be impossible, imo. Pretty freaky event, regardless. Demonstrates how our planet has quite the protective capabilities.
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Old 04-14-19, 12:00 AM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

The Yuba incident has a lot of strange occurrences that haven’t been mentioned. I recently discovered this and the Dyatlov Pass incident on a podcast called “What If?” The hosts can be a bit goofy, but they did great episodes on both incidents.

Yuba: Ep. #36 - What If You Never Came Home? - The American Dyatlov Pass

Dyatlov: Ep. #97 - What If You Never Came Home? Pt. 2 - The Dyatlov Pass Incident -

If you want a more in-depth podcast on The Dyatlov Pass, Astonishing Legends did a good series, They jumped around a bit with the story, but it is pretty detailed.

https://www.astonishinglegends.com/a...ov-pass-part-1
https://www.astonishinglegends.com/a...ov-pass-part-2

Astonishing Legends also recently announced efforts to reopen the Dyatlov investigation:
https://www.astonishinglegends.com/a...dyatlov-update

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Old 04-14-19, 04:56 AM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

I loved watching "In Search Of..." in the 1970s. Lots of eerie stuff on that show, including creepy Moog synthesizer music and Mr. Spock himself,. Many of the episodes have been debunked in the intervening 40+ years, but most are still spooky as hell, including the Tunguska event episode.

The entire series has been released on DVD about 6 years ago. Every once in a while I put on a random episode and am instantly transported back in time...
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Old 04-14-19, 10:05 AM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

I thought the Nazca Lines was fascination. There some theories how it was about but it still remained a mystery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazca_Lines
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Old 04-14-19, 10:11 AM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

All I can contribute to the Yuba City incident is that the Sierra Nevada Mountains will swallow you up. So many have died there. It’s a vast and unforgiving place.

That Russian mystery reminds me of this Sierra Nevada mystery. Summarized here: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.str...s%3fformat=amp

That writer read the excellent book The Last Season. A nonfiction account of the very experienced outdoorsman dies and his body can’t be found despite the largest search and rescue operation in California history. Years later his body is found. They look back through the extensive records made during the search and discover that dogs twice indicated at the very spot he was found. They were THAT CLOSE and they still didn’t find him. That’s how vast the Sierras are. People can be 5 feet away and you can’t find them.

Or google Stacey Arras. What outside or keyboard investigators frequently get wrong in her case is they say, “She left the camp to hike to the lake only a quarter mile away and was never seen again. That was so close that someone would have heard something or seen something.” That is flawed thinking. A quarter mile in the Sierras and you are just gone. You might as well be in another time zone.



Last edited by Mabuse; 04-14-19 at 11:01 AM.
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Old 04-14-19, 04:30 PM
  #16  
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Originally Posted by PhantomStranger View Post
The odd story of Boston Mills, Ohio aka Helltown. The government evicted everyone living there during the 1970s over likely toxic material left after local strip mining, but lots of odd stuff going on.

Investigating the Real Story Behind Ohio?s Helltown: Legends, Lies, and Lost Truths
That calls to mind Centralia, Pennsylvania, which was more or less abandoned in the '80s when it was deemed unsafe due to an underground coal fire that had been burning since 1962:


Or Chernobyl. These are not mysteries, but eerie nonetheless. Anything abandoned, such as old amusement parks (I think we had a thread on those here), gives me shivers. Once there was life, and there are remnants to see, but it's long gone.
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Old 04-14-19, 04:53 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Originally Posted by zyzzle View Post
The most fabulous mystery to me is the Black Dahlia case in Los Angeles of 1947. Police corruption, graft, and intentional obfuscation existed in the LA Police far, far before the OJ Simpson scandal almost 50 years later. A lot was covered up and the case remains "unsolved" today, though dozens of books have been written about the case.
James Ellroy's novel "The Black Dahlia" is pretty good.

De Palma's movie adaptation was featured in a column: "The Hunt for the Worst Movie of all Time". It's putrid.
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Old 04-14-19, 05:12 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

It’s a bad movie, but it’s nowhere near the worst. And actually has some brief moments of excellence.
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Old 04-14-19, 06:12 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

The Hodel book "Black Dahlia Avenger" is better than any movie. Read it. The 1987 Ellroy novel was inspired, and good, but only used the Dahlia case as a stepping off point to an entirely fictitious narrative.

The whole "How were the great Pyramids of Egypt built?" is not truly a mystery to me. The unescapable answer? An excess of expendable slave labor and plenty of time -- centuries -- to get the measurements exact.

Similar story for the Nazca Lines and other "impossible" geometric landscape designs. When you look at what one man, Christo Vladimirov Javacheff, can accomplish in his "wrap art", it's not surprising what thousands can accomplish in landscape art and / or vast geological constructions such as pyramids, temples, tombs, etc.
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Old 04-14-19, 06:14 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Whoever wrote that "expressionless" story wasn't trying very hard. Seems like this thread ought to be kept to events that were actually reported in the news or in history (not just viral social media garbage).

This thread is pretty meta though. The continued existence of DVD Talk in 2019 is a pretty unexplainable event if you ask me.
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Old 04-14-19, 07:03 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Originally Posted by Norm de Plume View Post
That calls to mind Centralia, Pennsylvania, which was more or less abandoned in the '80s when it was deemed unsafe due to an underground coal fire that had been burning since 1962:
.
A lot of people learned about Centralia after Silent Hill came out. I lived hours away and never heard of it.
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Old 04-14-19, 09:40 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

I'd be remiss if I didn't plug the documentary The Town that Was about Centralia. The link is to my review thereof.

As my unacceptable contribution to the thread; I always liked the urban legend of Polybius, the brain-washing video game that was deployed and tested around Portland Oregon in the early '80s. There was a podcast about it featuring one of the kids who was affected, so it has to be true!
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Old 04-14-19, 10:35 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

In Miami police reporter Edna Buchanan's 1988 memoir "The Corpse Had a Familiar Face," she wrote an entire chapter on unsolved cases, most involving people who disappeared never to be found. One that I have always remembered is from the early 1970s. A grey-haired man with a mustache checked into Miami's Biscayne Terrace Hotel, stayed for three months in room 708, and was found on the roof of the hotel a few days after Christmas having committed suicide by gunshot. When the police investigated, they found that this guy had done everything he could to make sure he was never identified. He had signed in with a fictitious name and a nonexistent address, claiming to be a self-employed salesman. He paid for everything in cash; his billfold contained $50 but nothing else, no identification of any kind. All of the labels had been cut out of all his clothes and the initials scraped from his briefcase. By taking apart the Omega watch he had been wearing, investigators were able to locate a marking inside that led them to information from its Swiss manufacturer that it had been delivered to a New York wholesaler in 1953. What they were able to trace of the gun indicated that it had been lost or stolen from the factory that manufactured it in 1917. There had been no record of it in the intervening time.

I looked online tonight to see if I could find any indication that this case was ever solved, and came up empty. This guy won the anonymous death sweepstakes for sure.
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Old 04-15-19, 12:54 AM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Originally Posted by Kurt D View Post
I'd be remiss if I didn't plug the documentary The Town that Was about Centralia. The link is to my review thereof.

As my unacceptable contribution to the thread; I always liked the urban legend of Polybius, the brain-washing video game that was deployed and tested around Portland Oregon in the early '80s. There was a podcast about it featuring one of the kids who was affected, so it has to be true!
Last year Hulu aired a show called Dimension 404. It was an anthology show that mostly played like a poor manís Black Mirror. They actually had a Polybius episode.
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Old 04-15-19, 07:01 PM
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Re: Eerie mysteries and unexplained events

Originally Posted by zyzzle View Post
The Hodel book "Black Dahlia Avenger" is better than any movie. Read it. The 1987 Ellroy novel was inspired, and good, but only used the Dahlia case as a stepping off point to an entirely fictitious narrative.
I believe I have that book. At any rate, I do have a Dahlia book written by Hodel. If that's the only one he wrote, then that's it.
There are hundreds of mysterious unsolved murders and abductions we could discuss here, if desired. One that comes up often, and I think I have a book about it as well, is the disappearance of the three Beaumont children in Australia in 1966. Another popular one is the "Sumter County Does", a young man and woman who were found murdered in South Carolina in 1976, and never identified.
Then there's the Keddie Cabin Murders, the Hinterkaifeck farm-family massacre, and I could go on and on.
One of the most recent unsolved crimes I find very disturbing is the 2017 murder of the two girls in Delphi, In. One girl had the wherewithal to take a blurry picture of the man who killed her and her friend, as well as recording a brief audio snippet of his voice.
I used to be a regular poster at Websleuths, but a few years ago I lost interest in all the conjecture that led nowhere.
Originally Posted by Vibiana
Spoiler:
In Miami police reporter Edna Buchanan's 1988 memoir "The Corpse Had a Familiar Face," she wrote an entire chapter on unsolved cases, most involving people who disappeared never to be found. One that I have always remembered is from the early 1970s. A grey-haired man with a mustache checked into Miami's Biscayne Terrace Hotel, stayed for three months in room 708, and was found on the roof of the hotel a few days after Christmas having committed suicide by gunshot. When the police investigated, they found that this guy had done everything he could to make sure he was never identified. He had signed in with a fictitious name and a nonexistent address, claiming to be a self-employed salesman. He paid for everything in cash; his billfold contained $50 but nothing else, no identification of any kind. All of the labels had been cut out of all his clothes and the initials scraped from his briefcase. By taking apart the Omega watch he had been wearing, investigators were able to locate a marking inside that led them to information from its Swiss manufacturer that it had been delivered to a New York wholesaler in 1953. What they were able to trace of the gun indicated that it had been lost or stolen from the factory that manufactured it in 1917. There had been no record of it in the intervening time.

I looked online tonight to see if I could find any indication that this case was ever solved, and came up empty. This guy won the anonymous death sweepstakes for sure.
That's highly intriguing. Did the police release autopsy photos or drawings of the man's face, or was it destroyed by the gunshot?
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