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Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

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Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Old 04-16-15, 10:49 PM
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Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Well, since I will soon be an empty nester, I have decided to adopt a dog. It turns out that adoption from dog rescues is an incredibly invasive process. So far, one rescue has a 7 page application. Another requires that you sign a release of confidential information so they can read your other pets' veterinary records. Both require home visits, which I'm okay with.

However, I'm feeling like this is much more of a PITA than I wanted, and I'm wondering if I should just buy a dog. For a rescue dog, I was looking at poodle mixes (these are not poodle rescues--just dog rescues with lots of different mixed breeds). I'm thinking that I could reserve a poodle puppy from an unborn litter for far less trouble, and I'd have more of a guarantee of temperament. The show breeders I've seen do have contracts, but they also have much less nosy applications (you have to promise some things, but they don't want to poke through your pets' medical records).

Has anyone else come across this? Maybe I'm being over sensitive--I own a house with a fenced back yard and have 2 rescue cats that I brought with me to Oregon from Alaska (so I'm not a "pet abandoner.") One of my cats is getting his teeth removed on Tuesday--would the judgmental pet rescues think that's good because I'm getting dental care for my cat, or bad because I put it off for a month after it was recommended until I found a new job? Or bad that he needs dental care at all (though the vet said it was an autoimmune type of condition). Basically, I'm finding this process kind of intimidating, which is why I'm guessing in five to ten months, I'll be the proud new mama of a purebred pet quality poodle puppy.

So . . . are these long applications too intrusive, or am I wrong about this?

Last edited by tasha99; 04-16-15 at 11:13 PM.
Old 04-16-15, 11:15 PM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

That's a lot more than I went through 13 years ago. Maybe things have gotten tougher or you're just dealing with a very cautious rescue group. In my case, they did do the home/yard inspection - and pointed out a few potential dangers that I would've overlooked, so I was fine with that. The paperwork was minimal though. I know these places try to make sure they're placing animals in homes that are safe, but this really sounds overboard.

Oh, and good on you for rescuing!
Old 04-17-15, 01:08 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

I agree,that is asking for to much info and just A pain to help A pet in need.
I would try a different a shelter,unless they have A dog that you really want.

My family and I have Adopted four dogs from three different shelters over the years.
And the process was very simple.


I just adopted another dog from Willamette Humane Society in Salem about 6 weeks ago,and had to one or two page application.
Also Safe Haven in Albany is nice animal shelter.

And welcome to Oregon.pet photo latter.

Last edited by JoeySeven; 04-17-15 at 01:21 AM.
Old 04-17-15, 01:45 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

The last time I adopted a dog, I don't remember if I had to fill out a long questionnaire, but I had to go through an interview (they asked if I had a yard, where the dog would stay, and whether I had time to exercise the dog since I wanted to get a big, active dog).

And, since I already had another dog, I had to bring him in to see if the two dogs would get along. Apparently they passed the sniff test and I was allowed to adopt the second dog.

It was a hassle, but it was well worth it.
Old 04-17-15, 09:33 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

I agree with find another rescue, we got a rescue pup this past Christmas and there was a questionnaire, but no home visit and nothing too invasive. They just wanted to make sure the pup was going somewhere it would not be abused.

Once you have adopted from a more friendly place, complain back to that rescue that they lost a good home for one of their pets due to their insane background checks and stupid policies. Sure they won't care, but if they hear it enough, they may lighten up a little.

I am not sure what the point is in all that?? Being at your house has to be better than being in a rescue kennel cage all day.

I had a dog growing up years and year ago, but this is our first pup as a family and no one at the rescue really seemed to care too much (maybe we seem like nice people?). There were no pet medical records to check on us anywhere

I think we paid $250 'adoption fee' or something like that, that seemed to be all they really cared about

sounds bizarre to me that you have that much trouble.
Old 04-17-15, 10:35 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Yeah, I think I might have just found a couple of picky places. Actually the long questionnaire is annoying, but I filled it out. It's the vet records that bug me. Promising to get a vet is reasonable, reading records to see what kind of health care choices were made is too much.

I think I was so worked up because I had to give an explanation on the questionnaire of every pet that I'd had that died in the past 10 years. So I had to explain about the time we had our cat euthanized for a prolapsed rectum--so traumatic and I spent most of yesterday worked up about that. (I'm usually a really calm person, but that was one of the worst times ever in my life--middle of the night, my cat with her colon starting to come out, two crying kids, and a vet saying it was unlikely anything she could do would be successful.)

I'm just going to mail in the questionnaire I filled out and see what happens. They don't have a dog I want to adopt right now--it's for if they find one that they think would be a good match. I'll keep looking other places as well.
Old 04-17-15, 10:38 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

I've adopted two dogs. Both are awesome. The process is really not that hard, it's just that demand for rescue dogs has increased dramatically over the past couple of decades and agencies can afford to be picky.

IMO, obtaining a based on breed is silly especially since so many rescue dogs need homes:
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aCv10_WvGxo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Old 04-17-15, 10:47 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

When did we start calling dogs from the pound "rescues?"

If you ran into a burning building or swam through floodwater or repelled down into a cave, you rescued a dog. If you went to the pound to get a dog, you went to the pound to get a dog.
Old 04-17-15, 10:53 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by RoyalTea View Post
When did we start calling dogs from the pound "rescues?"

If you ran into a burning building or swam through floodwater or repelled down into a cave, you rescued a dog. If you went to the pound to get a dog, you went to the pound to get a dog.
There are many rescues that actually do "rescue" dogs from puppy mills, dogfighting rings, and abusive homes. What's wrong with the term?
Old 04-17-15, 10:59 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

In the land of dog-fighting here in FL, where I read a few times a week about people's pitbull dogs being stolen from their yard and presumable being used as fighters/bait dogs, the local shelters here will give you a pet in about 20 minutes 15 of those minutes are you picking out the pet. Give them your address and payment.

Pure breds are dirt cheap from breeders down here. I got my 6 week old staffordshire terrier pup for $100. I got a dapple Dachshund 9 week old for $325. Higher end dogs like bulldogs, rott weilers and german shepherds are usually $800 or less. Pit bulls are a dime a dozen, I never see them for more than $200 unless they have a popular blood line and then it's usually $200-400. The vet visit costs more than the dog quite often.
Old 04-17-15, 11:04 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by RoyalTea View Post
When did we start calling dogs from the pound "rescues?"

If you ran into a burning building or swam through floodwater or repelled down into a cave, you rescued a dog. If you went to the pound to get a dog, you went to the pound to get a dog.
Who gives a shit? As long as the dogs find homes, people can call it whatever they want.
Old 04-17-15, 11:28 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by RoyalTea View Post
When did we start calling dogs from the pound "rescues?"

If you ran into a burning building or swam through floodwater or repelled down into a cave, you rescued a dog. If you went to the pound to get a dog, you went to the pound to get a dog.
You have your humane society etc (Typical pounds)

and then you have rescues (Rescues up here save a bunch of dogs from Texas)
Old 04-17-15, 11:36 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

The couple of places I contacted call themselves rescues, and one at least goes and picks dogs up from pounds and shelters in other areas. Same with my cats--one of them was in a pound for years and then the rescue adopted him (and had him for a long time, too)--adult cats have a hard time getting adopted with so many kittens constantly being born. I think of rescues as places that take animals from kill shelters or other situations before they're euthanized to give them a longer chance at adoption.

Originally Posted by Jacoby Ellsbury View Post
In the land of dog-fighting here in FL, where I read a few times a week about people's pitbull dogs being stolen from their yard and presumable being used as fighters/bait dogs, the local shelters here will give you a pet in about 20 minutes 15 of those minutes are you picking out the pet. Give them your address and payment.

Pure breds are dirt cheap from breeders down here. I got my 6 week old staffordshire terrier pup for $100. I got a dapple Dachshund 9 week old for $325. Higher end dogs like bulldogs, rott weilers and german shepherds are usually $800 or less. Pit bulls are a dime a dozen, I never see them for more than $200 unless they have a popular blood line and then it's usually $200-400. The vet visit costs more than the dog quite often.
Wow, that is much cheaper than what's here in the Pacific Northwest. All the places I looked were 1500-2000 for pet quality puppies, and you have to wait till they have one. I'm okay with both the wait and the cost. Even at higher prices, the price of the dog is a small percentage of ownership cost, especially with a breed that has to be groomed every few weeks.

Lots of pit bull mixes and surprisingly, chihuahua mixes, at the pound here. I love chihuahuas, but am looking for a little bigger dog. Not up for a pitbull for many reasons, not the least of which is my homeowners insurance. Of course, anyone with a restricted breed could try a product like this:

http://www.attackchi.org.au/


Last edited by tasha99; 04-17-15 at 11:58 AM.
Old 04-17-15, 11:49 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Rescues have great ideologies behind them. But in practice most are terrible. They seriously infringe upon adopters privacy and way cross the line with the things they request. You want access to my home? You want one of your volunteers to inspect my house? Screw that. I know more people that have been turned off by rescues and their vetting of potential owners than the other way around.
Old 04-17-15, 11:54 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

It must be that particular organization. When I did it, there was a two page application/questionnaire. It did have a clause that they could make a wellness check if they wanted but I haven't heard from them since the adoption.
Old 04-17-15, 11:56 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by Kdogg View Post
It must be that particular organization. When I did it, there was a two page application/questionnaire. It did have a clause that they could make a wellness check if they wanted but I haven't heard from them since the adoption.
We just adopted a dog last week and that was pretty much it. The application took about 10 minutes to fill out and they asked us a few questions (yard size, other animals -- we brought our other dog with us, they wanted the medical records for the dog we had -- they called the vet)


The whole process once we picked out the dog was about a half hour.
Old 04-17-15, 12:02 PM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by Kdogg View Post
It must be that particular organization. When I did it, there was a two page application/questionnaire. It did have a clause that they could make a wellness check if they wanted but I haven't heard from them since the adoption.
That's how the cat rescue I got my cats from was like. They did want me to say I would let the cats outside, but I didn't have a yard then. When I said I couldn't, they just waived that. I thought maybe dog rescues were different, but I'm thinking now that either I looked at a couple that are either extreme, or maybe they don't really follow through with all their demands.
Old 04-17-15, 12:26 PM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by RoyalTea View Post
When did we start calling dogs from the pound "rescues?"

If you ran into a burning building or swam through floodwater or repelled down into a cave, you rescued a dog. If you went to the pound to get a dog, you went to the pound to get a dog.
As I see it, anytime you provide a home to a homeless dog, you've "rescued" the dog from an uncertain fate. In my case that includes the dog that showed up in my yard one morning and I ended up keeping him when I wasn't able to find the owner.

With regards to the OP, I have also adopted a rescue dog once by filling out a 1 page form and paying a nominal fee like less than $100. It almost sounds like they think you're adopting a child. I would go some place else.
Old 04-17-15, 12:47 PM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Just half-ass the paperwork. type your vet's phone number wrong. if they have dogs they want to find homes for, they're not going to care about all the paper work. its mainly just a hoop to see if you do it. also to weed out the illiterates (because anyone who cant read would be a terrible dog owner)
Old 04-17-15, 01:42 PM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by RoyalTea View Post
When did we start calling dogs from the pound "rescues?"

If you ran into a burning building or swam through floodwater or repelled down into a cave, you rescued a dog. If you went to the pound to get a dog, you went to the pound to get a dog.
Considering that dog could be killed, yes, it's a rescue.
Old 04-17-15, 03:28 PM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by RoyalTea View Post
When did we start calling dogs from the pound "rescues?"
around the time Obama was elected? "Rescue" just feels so much better

I am pretty sure around the time that you needed to provide your life history, vet information, inspection of your home and DNA sample before they 'give' you a dog that you have to pay for.


I am all for half assing the paperwork, fuck em and who cares, either they want to save an animal or they don't, if they don't, then they are hypocrites and should be shut down. Tell them outright that there is no law requiring you to provide all that info and you disagree with their stupid policies.
Old 04-17-15, 04:18 PM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by tasha99 View Post
Well, since I will soon be an empty nester, I have decided to adopt a dog. It turns out that adoption from dog rescues is an incredibly invasive process. So far, one rescue has a 7 page application. Another requires that you sign a release of confidential information so they can read your other pets' veterinary records. Both require home visits, which I'm okay with.

However, I'm feeling like this is much more of a PITA than I wanted, and I'm wondering if I should just buy a dog.
First, remember that you are in Oregon where dogs are considered to be superior to humans. In fact, everything is considered superior to humans in Oregon. My family went to one, and after looking over the entire process, I said, "I get the feeling that this entire process probably leads people to simply give up the idea of 'doing the right thing' and adopting a dog, and leads them to just go buy one from the very people you blame for much of the problem." They appear to have heard this before and said, "We just want to ensure that they go to a good home." I said that based on the fact that my wife was a teacher, I ran my own business, we had 40 acres, etc. what is it that you think we lack in terms of caring for a dog? That stumped them a bit and then they talked about "procedure."

I apologized for taking up their time and we went and bought a dog.

Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
The process is really not that hard, it's just that demand for rescue dogs has increased dramatically over the past couple of decades and agencies can afford to be picky.
I agree with this, and it tells me that they don't really want to end the problem, they just want to work the whole supply/demand thing like any other business and stay in business. I see adopting a dog being similar to charity. People, out of the kindness of their hearts, are trying to kill two birds with one stone. They want a dog, and this place has dogs that needs home. And then they treat you like you just called the phone company and are trying to resolve some issue. They use to be a great thing. They have slowly become the type of institution most of them despise, and they didn't notice it happening.
Old 04-19-15, 03:34 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

I decided to buy a dog as well. I put in an application---only one page--to a breeder in California this morning. I did have to give FIVE references, but I'm willing to jump through more hoops for a nationally recognized breeder who naturally feels responsible for the dogs she brings into the world and has to sell because they're not show quality. Of course, all dogs deserve a great home even and maybe especially rescue dogs. Howver, I think applications with questions like: Do you own or rent. Own? Please show proof with a copy of a mortgage bill . . . . blah blah blah are a bit too much for me. I get it--people must lie sometimes. But I don't want to give copies of my mortgage paperwork or vet records to anyone. Maybe I'm becoming a privacy nut in my old age, but it's over the top for me.

So now I wait, and if I'm approved, I'll send in a deposit. Puppies to be born in June and I can take one home in September (they'd be ready in late August, but I talked to the breeder for a half hour this morning, and she would keep the puppy while I'm on vacation). She was actually amazing--so friendly and helpful. Now I have some time to puppy proof the house and plan.

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Old 04-19-15, 04:07 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
I've adopted two dogs. Both are awesome. The process is really not that hard, it's just that demand for rescue dogs has increased dramatically over the past couple of decades and agencies can afford to be picky.

IMO, obtaining a based on breed is silly especially since so many rescue dogs need homes:
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aCv10_WvGxo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
I both disagree and agree with some of the video. Mutts are great dogs. My cats are mutts. Love them. But, I think some of the purebred stuff was propaganda. Inbreeding is more of a backyard breeder problem, as are the health problems. Yes, most breeds have health issues to look out for--but real breeders are careful to attempt to prevent problems, test for problems, and offer guarantees. One thing is there is no distinction between a backyard breeder who breeds some sibling dogs and a show breeder who is trying to improve the breed. It's not the same thing. Plus, I agree that breeds are a made up construct, but poodles have been around for centuries.
And they're freaking adorable as long as you don't treat them like topiary:



I wish I had a big enough yard for a standard like the one pictured above. I have a small, city type lot, so I'm getting a miniature (not a "toy" sized) poodle. They're awfully cute, too, just medium sized instead of big.
Old 04-19-15, 07:54 AM
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Re: Adopting a rescue dog is a huge process

I have no idea what places you are going to. We got both of our rescues from the ASPCA days at the PetSmart. One page application and watching us with the dog for about 5 minutes, then leaving with them.

But I agree with you there is no way I'm giving my mortgage statement to someone I'm trying to adopt a dog from.

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