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US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

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US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Old 03-24-12, 05:00 PM
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US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

I graduated five years ago and still owe about 22K.


US student debt surpasses $1 trillion
By David Walsh
24 March 2012
According to a federal government agency, student loan debt in the US surpassed 1 trillion dollars “several months ago.” The finding, reported by a spokesman for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to a banking conference in Austin, Texas on Wednesday, is “much larger” (in his words) than other recent estimates.
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York issued a study in early March suggesting that the total student debt had reached $870 billion. The new figure is 16 percent higher than that estimate. This staggering amount is greater than the total owed by Americans on their credit cards or auto loans.
The CFPB announcement, which signifies that a considerable portion of the younger generation will be condemned to decades of debt, will not create a ripple within the American political and media establishment.
Leading newspaper editors and television pundits, as well as Democratic and Republican politicians, are universally agreed that the full cost of the economic crisis must be borne by the working population, whatever the consequences. Neither Barack Obama nor any of his Republican rivals will do anything about the deepening scandal of student debt.
The CFPB’s Rohit Chopra, in his comments March 21 to the Austin gathering, noted that the agency’s initial findings on the size of the private student loan debt had been “sobering,” and that when researchers added in the outstanding debt in the federal student loan program, they came up with the figure of $1 trillion. Chopra noted that, unlike other consumer credit products, “student debt keeps growing at a steady clip. Students borrowed $117 billion in just federal student loans last year. … If current trends continue, there will be consequences not just for young people, but for all of us.”
Chopra pointed out that federal student loan debt isn’t increasing simply because of individuals taking out new loans. “With so many borrowers unable to keep up with interest payments, debt is growing even for many who have left school.”
The CFPB student loan ombudsman added, “The lines of job-seekers are long, states are reducing their higher education budgets, and household budgets are straining. Young consumers are shouldering much of the punishment in the form of substantial student loan bills for doing exactly what they were told would be the key to a better life.”
The comment and findings, although couched in the usual understated language of such reports, are an indictment of a social order quite content—deliberately and on principle—to sacrifice the hopes and well-being of generations to defend the wealth of the ruling elite.
In the final analysis, the vast indebtedness of students and former students is one feature of the transfer of trillions from the working population to the super-rich. The slashing of budgets for higher education, the dramatic increases in college tuition, the emergence of a predatory student loan industry, the relentless hounding of those in debt, the enrichment of a handful of university administrators—all of these phenomena have taken place within the same social context, the unprecedented polarization of American society along class lines.
The various figures and processes are almost overwhelming to contemplate:
Total student loan debt has grown by 511 percent, or more, over the past dozen years. In the first quarter of 1999, a mere $90 billion in student loans were outstanding. That figure had soared to $550 billion in the second quarter of 2011, which may turn out to have been an underestimation. Between 1999-2000 and 2007-2008, private student loan borrowing grew four times, from $4.5 billion to $21.8 billion per year. The College Board reports that, adjusted for inflation, students are borrowing twice what they did a decade ago.
According to the Project on Student Debt, some two-thirds of college seniors graduated with loans in 2010. Those graduates also faced the highest official unemployment rate for young college graduates in recent history, 9.1 percent. The Economic Policy Institute estimates that between 2000 and 2011, wages for college-educated men and women entering the workforce saw their inflation-adjusted earnings fall 5.2 percent and 4.4 percent, respectively.
A recent study by NERA Economic Consulting points out that the 37 million people in the US currently holding student debt are “concentrated in the younger segment of the population, as more than 60 percent of the total is between the ages of 18 and 39.”
The consulting firm adds, “One of the most worrisome student borrowing trends is the increase in the number of high-debt borrowers who carry debt loads far above $25,000, the national average amongst undergraduate student borrowers. Student debt loads of $50,000, $100,000, and $200,000 are still the minority, but those high figures are becoming more common, and with unknown consequences for the individual debtors or the economy as a whole.”
Moreover, private and public lenders have “broad collection powers, far greater than those of mortgage or credit card lenders. The debt can’t be shed in bankruptcy” (USA Today).
The New York Federal Reserve estimates that as many as one in four borrowers who have begun repaying their student debts are already behind on payments. The situation means, for many, postponing moving out from their parents’ residence (some 6 million people between the ages of 25 and 34 are still living at home), buying a house, marrying or having children.
Meanwhile the cost of a college education has skyrocketed. The US Department of Education pointed out in August 2009 that while inflation had increased two and a half times over the previous 30 years, and medical costs six times, the cost of a college education had risen tenfold.
Average annual tuition at private universities in the United States is now more than $27,000 (room and board adds tens of thousands of dollars more). Harvard University charged students $600 a year in 1952 for tuition, or some $5,100 in 2012 dollars—the university’s tuition is presently $35,000. Although it may seem unbelievable to those of a certain generation, students attended the City University of New York for free until 1975.
Of course, for wealthy families, none of this is a problem. The Princeton Review observes that of the students admitted by 10 highly competitive colleges in the US in 2011, 48.8 percent were able to pay the full bill, which averaged $53,158.
As part of this overall process, a new species of multi-millionaire college presidents has also come into being. The New York Times reports that in the decade from 1999-2000 to 2009-10, “average presidential pay at the 50 wealthiest universities increased by 75 percent, to $876,792, while professorial pay increased 14 percent, to $179, 970.” Presidents at 36 private colleges earned more than $1 million in 2009, up from 33 the previous year.
The picture that emerges is of a society uninterested in the education and intellectual progress of the vast majority, except insofar as it profits rapacious corporate interests. There is nothing “democratic” about such a society in any meaningful sense.
The US population at present is prey for financial vultures, whose practices are facilitated by every level of government and the two major political parties. Indeed, America’s politicians see their central role as helping to fill the pockets of ruthless “entrepreneurs,” while enriching themselves in the process.
Many parents and students are outraged by the debt calamity, including the open criminality of many of the private lenders. However, opposition to the crisis, if it is serious, will have to address the underlying social and political questions: above all, the problem of social inequality and the incompatibility of the right to a decent education with the continued existence of the profit system.
The Socialist Equality Party stands for the immediate abolition of all student loan debt. Education is a basic social right and everyone is entitled to receive a quality education, at every level, free of charge. Taking the banks and giant corporations out of private hands and making them public institutions, democratically controlled by the population, will both create the framework for a rational economic order and provide the resources necessary to satisfy every social need.








SOURCE: http://wsws.org/articles/2012/mar2012/debt-m24.shtml
Old 03-24-12, 05:21 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

I've been employed in the credit/banking field my whole professional career (about 10 years now) and currently work in the student lending field.

The interesting thing to me is that when I dealt previously with credit card products and personal loan products, I disagreed with a lot my employers' practices and understood why consumers got so pissed off at banks; however, with student loans, much of the blame is misdirected. Yes, lenders do some disagreeable things (at least from a consumer perspective), but lenders do not determine tuition costs and lenders do not force students to take loans. Colleges are charging more and more for tuition, but salaries are not increasing at the same rate and, while the unemployment rate is lower for college graduates than non-grads, it's still a tough job market. The lender has nothing to do with any of this. Possibly, if colleges reigned in the tuition costs, student debt would not be as big a problem as it is these days for many people.
Old 03-24-12, 06:26 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

I have a huge student loan debt. It sucks, but I couldn't have gone to school without the loans, so I'm glad they were available. I'm riding public sector work out to eventual loan forgiveness on the income based repayment plan.

College costs are outrageous now. Not only has tuition gone up, but so have miscellaneous fees. The fees for my program at a state university were about $1500 per term. For an 8 quarter M.S. degree, I paid $12,000 in assorted fees.

Last edited by tasha99; 03-24-12 at 06:34 PM.
Old 03-24-12, 06:31 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by RoadToPerdition View Post
lenders do not determine tuition costs and lenders do not force students to take loans.
I have to agree with this, I have an employee that has about 100k in student loans because she took 6-7 years getting her bachelors degree at a private college (one semester she took all dance classes because she needed a break). She is now complaining about the loans and how the banks should find her a job if they want their money back. Obviously none of it is her fault.
Old 03-24-12, 07:34 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by mh4268 View Post
she took 6-7 years getting her bachelors degree at a private college
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Old 03-24-12, 07:43 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by RoadToPerdition View Post
I've been employed in the credit/banking field my whole professional career (about 10 years now) and currently work in the student lending field.

The interesting thing to me is that when I dealt previously with credit card products and personal loan products, I disagreed with a lot my employers' practices and understood why consumers got so pissed off at banks; however, with student loans, much of the blame is misdirected. Yes, lenders do some disagreeable things (at least from a consumer perspective), but lenders do not determine tuition costs and lenders do not force students to take loans. Colleges are charging more and more for tuition, but salaries are not increasing at the same rate and, while the unemployment rate is lower for college graduates than non-grads, it's still a tough job market. The lender has nothing to do with any of this. Possibly, if colleges reigned in the tuition costs, student debt would not be as big a problem as it is these days for many people.
I agree, it's not necessarily the lenders, but the institution and the marketing which says you MUST HAVE AN EDUCATION TO GET ANYWHERE IN TODAY'S SOCIETY. This is utter bullshit. You get the job FIRST, then you have your employer direct you for education in your field.

Getting an education before you even officially have the damn job is just nonsense. By the time you get your education, the market has shifted and you're just another sucker with a loan. You're better off going to a car dealership.

I also think students should get bailed-out. Why are students getting all the blame and "responsibility" bullshit when we have major lenders who got a fucking free pass from the US Government. And then the US Government is telling me and millions of others that it's my responsibility. What a fucking joke.
Old 03-24-12, 07:48 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Yeah all those people went to the wrong college, or did it wrong. Oh they went to an ivy league school? Then they got some stupid degree! No matter what it's their fault! Upward mobility is just fine in the US!

They went to an ivy league school and got a law degree and were told there was a 97% job placement track record and in reality it's more like 40%, and graduates are now suing several of those schools, for lying to them and ruining the rest of their lives with massive debt, all for a degree that will not gain them an income to cope with the debt? It's still all their fault! They did it wrong! Upward mobility is alive and well in the US!

The debt levels of people trying to move upward in the society via education are negating the income potential of the degrees they get. It's never been anywhere close to this in any nation in history, higher education is in itself a gimmick used to make money for the already wealthy and create a permanently indebted underclass, it's painfully obvious. They're all stupid and doing it wrong! Upward mobility is fine!

[they fight until Arthur cuts off Black Knight's left arm] Now, stand aside, worthy adversary! 'Tis but a scratch! A scratch? Your arm's off! No, it isn't! Well, what's that then? I've had worse. You liar! Come on, you pansy! [they fight again. Arthur cuts off the Knight's right arm] Victory is mine!
[kneels to pray] We thank thee, Lord, that in thy mercy [cut off by the Black Knight kicking him] Come on, then. What? Have at you! You are indeed brave, Sir Knight, but the fight is mine! Oh, had enough, eh? Look, you stupid bastard. You've got no arms left! Yes I have. *Look*! It's just a flesh wound.

Old 03-24-12, 07:50 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

You're better off putting $40,000 in an investment and letting it sit for 40 years than paying for a "degree".
Old 03-24-12, 07:54 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

"The Socialist Equality Party stands for the immediate abolition of all student loan debt."

Oh, all CURRENT debt---how convenient. Sounds to me like those young capitalist fatcats of the Socialist Equality Party just want to line their own pockets. What about the exploited proletariat like me who have already PAID their student loans back? Oh, I suppose the running dog capitalists weren't exploiting young students 20 years ago, and it's only started happening recently? Typical reactionary, counter-revolutionary rationalization. Surely if free education at all levels is a basic human right now, then it also was 20 years ago. I demand taxpayer-paid reparations for all the money I paid to the corrupt university system---and I also want to be reimbursed for the interest that money would have accrued if the greedy 1% hadn't cheated me out of my money. And I'm not just talking bachelor's degree, either. I was also further swindled when this corrupt society convinced me that post-graduate education was a good thing.
Old 03-24-12, 07:55 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Until someone puts a stop to ridiculous costs to attend to college, that student debt will only increase exponentially.
Old 03-24-12, 07:57 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by Dr Mabuse View Post
Yeah all those people went to the wrong college, or did it wrong.
They didn't do it wrong at all. The problem is students take a loan--it's more like gambling--and they are stuck with absolutely NOTHING to show for it but a very large debt, and in meantime, they are being told to "major in something else" or go BACK TO SCHOOL (ha ha ha) to get trained in something else they might like.

Your degree is becoming less and less worthy as the colleges and community colleges are cutting the time validation of that degree. What happens?

You end up taking at least a year or more of just Pre-reqs for that particular institution, THEN you go on to take the other courses in your field. It's money for the educational institutions and they are taking advantage of their power to invalidate courses taken.
Old 03-24-12, 10:25 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by DVD Polizei View Post
I agree, it's not necessarily the lenders, but the institution and the marketing which says you MUST HAVE AN EDUCATION TO GET ANYWHERE IN TODAY'S SOCIETY. This is utter bullshit. You get the job FIRST, then you have your employer direct you for education in your field.
These are good points. Most of the skills needed for a particular job, from my experience, are learned on the job. Many companies operate using their own methods that aren't learned in a school. You can get a base foundation and learn things in a broad sense in school, but it doesn't really prepare you for what you need on a job.

The other problem is that most kids and parents these days still think that all you need is a college degree and that it matters not what the major/concentration is of the degree. Plus, kids want to go to school for majors or classes that they find "fun" rather than bankable ones. I think you can have a balance and kids just need to weigh out "fun" and what is actually desirable in the workforce nowadays. That art degree or communications degree aren't worth the paper they're printed on (no offense to anyone here who has one, but a new art or communications graduate most likely isn't finding work in that field coming out of school today).
Old 03-24-12, 10:48 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Fucking Obama!
Old 03-25-12, 12:09 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Paid my law school loans off easily over 10 years. Damn cheap percentage rate.

But I agree that tuition costs are absurd. What you learn in college/grad school is not worth what you pay.
Old 03-25-12, 01:43 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

My wife and I together have something in the neighborhood of $400K in student loan debt combined. However, the bulk of it is consolidated at a low interest rate and we actually did get degrees with a near guaranteed salary sufficient to pay off the loans and live pretty well.
Old 03-25-12, 01:49 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

"The Greeks had a beautiful word for 'vulgarity'; they called it apeirokalia, lack of experience in things beautiful. Liberal education [should and used to] provide us with experience in things beautiful."
Old 03-25-12, 02:25 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

I've been farting around off and on for the past couple of years with my college direction. Education is very important to me, but my situation isn't like traditional college-age students. I'm 25 but I've been working full-time since I was 18. Most of my friends graduated with various degrees in 2008 but here I am and I still have a year of community college left.

I couldn't understand going the 4-year school route like most of my friends did since they did the traditional major-in-something just to go to to school, when in turn none of their degrees got them anywhere that typical on-the-job experience could've gotten them. I'll admit my job is pretty shitty, and so is the healthcare field in general which is what I've gotten sucked in to because of the job market, but the reason I decided to go back and get my ass in gear is because of motivation from working in a shitty industry.

I've been lucky in that California has the cheapest tuition rates for 2-year schools in the country. In 2004 when I had started CC in New York (where I'm from originally), I was shelling out $76 per unit. I didn't want to take out loans so I was paying out of pocket while working at night. Needless to say it didn't work out well because I could barely afford taking more than a few classes at once. When I moved out here I started going to school in 2008 and was only paying $20 per unit. It's gone up to $32 now, but given my low-income bracket I qualify for a tuition waiver fee and only pay for books each semester.

With the way things are going with the traditional 4-year schools out here, I fear to think what I'm going to be paying when I finally transfer to a UC or CSU in 2013. I have ambitions to get my Master's right after my BA so I'm anticipating swimming in debt at some point.
Old 03-25-12, 04:18 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

I don't see this as being a huge problem. One you have a college degree, you have it forever. No one can take it away from you. What can they take away from you? That house you've been paying off for 15 years but now can't afford the payments.

$40,000 investment may turn out great, but it won't get you a job.
Old 03-25-12, 04:40 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by PopcornTreeCt View Post
$40,000 investment may turn out great, but it won't get you a job.
This all goes back to what you decide to major in and what path you decide to follow. I know quite a few people that got engineering degrees in various fields, but ended up working in sales and other unrelated disciplines. Those I can see it as a waste. The ones that ended up pursuing careers in the actual field are living comfortably and can pay that $40,000 education off within a number of years no problem.

I've always been told it's not what you major in, but that you actually get the degree. This holds true for most non-hard science degrees.
Old 03-25-12, 07:06 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by focker View Post
My wife and I together have something in the neighborhood of $400K in student loan debt combined. However, the bulk of it is consolidated at a low interest rate and we actually did get degrees with a near guaranteed salary sufficient to pay off the loans and live pretty well.
Have you started working yet? wait until the tax bills come. Then you'll find out how soul-crushing it can be.
Old 03-25-12, 09:08 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by Superboy View Post
Have you started working yet? wait until the tax bills come. Then you'll find out how soul-crushing it can be.
Yes. Taxes are brutal. I also make too much to deduct my student loan interest on my taxes, which made me crazy the first time I did my taxes after getting a real job. The whole tax system seems designed to fuck me. I have a high income, but it's all from actual wages. I don't qualify for many deductions and I have a massively negative net worth with my massive educational debt. It blows.
Old 03-25-12, 11:33 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by PopcornTreeCt View Post
I don't see this as being a huge problem. One you have a college degree, you have it forever. No one can take it away from you. What can they take away from you? That house you've been paying off for 15 years but now can't afford the payments.

$40,000 investment may turn out great, but it won't get you a job.
Originally Posted by mcfly View Post
This all goes back to what you decide to major in and what path you decide to follow. I know quite a few people that got engineering degrees in various fields, but ended up working in sales and other unrelated disciplines. Those I can see it as a waste. The ones that ended up pursuing careers in the actual field are living comfortably and can pay that $40,000 education off within a number of years no problem.

I've always been told it's not what you major in, but that you actually get the degree. This holds true for most non-hard science degrees.
hint: Popcorn is one of those people who got a degree that is useless in the real world.
Old 03-25-12, 11:57 AM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Yes, but I'm getting a real one now. Lesson learned.
Old 03-25-12, 12:24 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

A bachelors degree is the new high school diploma in that most employers use it as a qualifier just to weed out potential candidates. For most degree programs, it is a more a sign of perseverance and ability to see something through than anything else.

I think the real shame in lending practices is that they will offer you so much more than you really need to cover your tuition. 18-19 year old kids take the full amount offered because they think hey, free money, I'm rich, only to realize a few years later that their loan amount is way higher than it could have been. Federally subsidized loans should cover the cost of tuition, fees and books and nothing else.
Old 03-25-12, 03:08 PM
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Re: US student debt surpasses $1 trillion

Originally Posted by PopcornTreeCt View Post
Yes, but I'm getting a real one now. Lesson learned.
What did you major in before?

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