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Prime Rib Advice

Old 12-13-09, 10:19 AM
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Prime Rib Advice

My Father-in-Law wants a prime rib for Christmas, and I am willing to oblige, as I am tired of turkey already.

I was thinking of following the Lawrey's recipe, found here: http://www.lawrysonline.com/theprime...go_recipes.asp

I will probably cook to med-rare, and (gas) grill any slices people want done further. When I used to work in a restaurant, we would put them in hot au jus to cook. Smoking on the Weber was also an option, but he wants baked.

Any ways, the au jus is my concern. If i follow the above recipe, how would I make the au jus?

Does anybody have a better recipe for the prime? I really enjoy the "crust" of spices on the outside of a good prime rib, but I am not sure what that typically consists of.
Old 12-13-09, 12:55 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Check out the Food Network, Guy Fieri had a good recipe.
Good Luc
Old 12-13-09, 01:34 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I rotisserie mine, I cannot imagine baking a prime rib
Old 12-13-09, 03:11 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I'd cook it in a smoker or a least a charcoal grill. It is all about the internal temperature and don't over do it!!

Couple of my favorite (they use a weber smoker, but because they really use high temps you could use a kettle charcoal grill or other charcoal grill).

http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/ribroast2.html

http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/ribroast1.html

http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/ribroast4.html

You can also try Alton's way...clay pot and pan sauce...

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html
Old 12-13-09, 03:20 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I have the Weber smoker, but he wants baked. I assume most places cook it in a convection oven, but I don't have that option.

I looked at TVWB site already, when I was initially planning on smoking it.

I will check Guy's and Alton's recipes.
Old 12-13-09, 03:53 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I'm just curious, why does "he" want it baked? And putting it on the weber smoker is pretty much baking it (you are cooking it at 325+), but you get the added flavor of the smoke. Your not going to do is "low and slow" like smoking.

No offense, but it kind of sounds like he doesn't know what he is talking about.

BTW I think convection ovens are overrated. I have one and it still has hot spots and is not even. My daughter will bake cookies on a 3/4 sheet pan and she has to rotate it even with the fan on (convection). You can do the same think, just rotate your roast around 2-3 times during baking.

edit: if you read the reviews on Alton's receipt, many (most) don't use the clay pot and report excellent results. There is some debate over there is the pot would do what Alton says it would do.

Last edited by Sdallnct; 12-13-09 at 04:00 PM.
Old 12-13-09, 03:58 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Old 12-13-09, 04:25 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I've gotten to be a big Tyler Florence fan. This sounds good and looks like he cooks it more conventional (in the oven).

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/t...ipe/index.html

Bobby Flay is another favorite. His is pretty basic, other than adding whole garlic in the roast.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/b...ipe/index.html

Last edited by Sdallnct; 12-13-09 at 04:29 PM.
Old 12-13-09, 04:25 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

A baked prime rib done well is fantastic. We use rock salt for the rub.

Damn, I want one too.
Old 12-13-09, 04:32 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by Sdallnct View Post
I've gotten to be a big Tyler Florence fan. This sounds good and looks like he cooks it more conventional (in the oven).

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/t...ipe/index.html

Bobby Flay is another favorite. His is pretty basic, other than adding whole garlic in the roast.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/b...ipe/index.html
I used the Florence recipe a few months ago, it came out great. Highly recommend it.
Old 12-13-09, 05:03 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

The salt on the bottom of the roaster sounds like a way to RUIN any plans for au jus or gravy.

I use the following recipe which my mother passed to me, and it works well:


Standing Rib Roast

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time:
Categories : Entrees

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
Rib roast, at least 2-3 rib cut
1 large onion
Lawry salt and pepper
1 jar boiled onions, 16 oz
flour to thicken gravy

Get at least a 2-3 rib cut, well marbled with fat, Jab with knife 5-6 places on top and botom, insert slivers of onion. Sprinkle well all over with Lawry salt and pepper. Place in roaster, rib side down over layer of sliced onions. Fat side will be up. secure a few onion slices to fat side with toothpicks.

Roast at 350°, allowing 30 minutes per pound for medium roast, or per meat thermometer. Let roast stand for 20 minutes before slicing.

Onions, gravy:

Get 1 pound jar of tiny boiled onions. Drain and boil in water for 25 minutes before roast is finished, and drain onions. After roast is removed, pour onions into roaster, with roast drippings. Place over heat and stir until well browned and hot. Remove to serving bowl with slotted spoon.

Pour roast drippings into large measuring cup (2 cup). Let meat juice settle to bottom, fat will rise. Pour off fat carefully, reserving 1/3 cup of meat juice and fat. Mix in 3 tablespoons of flour, stirring well. Slowly add 1 1/2 cups of water, stirring constantly. Pour into roaster and cook over medium heat until thick.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Old 12-13-09, 05:21 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

OK, on these receipts that have you cut slivers to put in onion or garlic, don't those slices allow moisture to run out????

My rule is to never "poke" the meat. Even when grilling I only use tongs....
Old 12-13-09, 05:40 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

The way I always cooked prime rib was on the stove top in a stewpot.

And yes, it is fine to make some deep slices and put some seasoning in (I always used chopped up garlic, never tried onion, but don't see any reason that wouldn't be ok). A rub of salt/pepper- maybe a bit of garlic powder on the outside.
The reason it is ok to make these slices, is because you are going to then braise all the sides of the roast in the heated pot over medium heat. Braising is just quickly browning the outside with higher heat.
This helps to lock in some of the juices and gives the outer slices a nice crusty texture (similar to when you grill).
After the Roast is sufficiently braised (maybe 5-10 minutes per side, don't worry about over braising it), lower the heat, add 1/2 to 1 cup of water, put the lid on it and roast it in the pot for about 20-30 minutes per lb.
Check the temp- if it is cooked enough, remove it from the pot and let it sit for about 15-20 minutes before you carve it. There will be plenty of au jus in the pot. I like the gravy thinner myself, but you can always add flour if you want to thicken it up. Definitely scrape the pot to get those little bits into the gravy.

very simple.


I've never tried 'baking' a prime rib- it seems like that would be a good way to dry the thing out (something you DO NOT want to do). If you were to 'bake' it, I would wrap it up in tin foil and and keep it in there the whole baking time. And if you do choose to wrap it in foil and roast it in the oven, I would still make some slices, put in the garlic or onion and then braise it before putting it in the oven.

good luck!

Last edited by Paul_SD; 12-13-09 at 05:50 PM.
Old 12-13-09, 06:05 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I don't know why he wants if baked. I am guessing that he likes it that way. I assume most places use an oven, he really likes if from some casino in Vegas.

The Guy recipe has all 5 stars on the foodnetwork.com, so that bodes well. The episode airs next Sunday, but according to the recipe, it needs to be underway around the 18th. I will look at the Florence recipe as well.

It is part of his "Christmas" so it will be cooked the way he wants, although I would be smoking it (Oak and apple or cherry).

The salt thing from Lawry's seemed odd, which was why I was questioning it. But I figured people here have had the rib there, and could weigh in.

Also, how much should I get for 6 people (with leftovers)? Bone on or off?
Old 12-13-09, 06:21 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I'm in the baked camp and that's the way I make it. I think the Florence recipe looks fine, but I start the oven at 450°, put the roast in, then turn down to 350° after about 10-15 mins. It helps sear the outside and keep the juices in.

Five pounds of a bone in roast should be plenty for 6 people. I think the rule-of-thumb is one rib per 2 people so you'd want 3 ribs.
Old 12-13-09, 07:00 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by Sdallnct View Post
OK, on these receipts that have you cut slivers to put in onion or garlic, don't those slices allow moisture to run out????

My rule is to never "poke" the meat. Even when grilling I only use tongs....
It's not health food. There is a LOT of fat. If cooked fat up, it will render and baste the meat.
Old 12-13-09, 08:12 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by Sdallnct View Post


BTW I think convection ovens are overrated. I have one and it still has hot spots and is not even. My daughter will bake cookies on a 3/4 sheet pan and she has to rotate it even with the fan on (convection). You can do the same think, just rotate your roast around 2-3 times during baking.

edit: if you read the reviews on Alton's receipt, many (most) don't use the clay pot and report excellent results. There is some debate over there is the pot would do what Alton says it would do.
Originally Posted by Sdallnct View Post
OK, on these receipts that have you cut slivers to put in onion or garlic, don't those slices allow moisture to run out????

My rule is to never "poke" the meat. Even when grilling I only use tongs....
Why do you keep calling it a receipt?

anyway I think convection ovens don't work the way they are supposed to either.
cookies and bisquits or whatever never cook evenly.

so what about one of those mini electric George Forman rotisseries?
Old 12-13-09, 08:58 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by whotony View Post
Why do you keep calling it a receipt?

anyway I think convection ovens don't work the way they are supposed to either.
cookies and bisquits or whatever never cook evenly.

so what about one of those mini electric George Forman rotisseries?
Sorry, my auto correction is screwing up and I'm not paying attention....
Old 12-13-09, 09:03 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by whotony View Post
Why do you keep calling it a receipt?
re·ceipt (r-st)
n.
1.
a. The act of receiving: We are in receipt of your letter.
b. The fact of being or having been received: They denied receipt of the shipment.
2. A quantity or amount received. Often used in the plural: cash receipts.
3. A written acknowledgment that a specified article, sum of money, or shipment of merchandise has been received.
4. A recipe.


It comes from the practice of not bringing your cook books into the kitchen, but copying the recipe on a piece of paper (receipt.)
Old 12-13-09, 09:04 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by Paul_SD View Post
The way I always cooked prime rib was on the stove top in a stewpot.

And yes, it is fine to make some deep slices and put some seasoning in (I always used chopped up garlic, never tried onion, but don't see any reason that wouldn't be ok). A rub of salt/pepper- maybe a bit of garlic powder on the outside.
The reason it is ok to make these slices, is because you are going to then braise all the sides of the roast in the heated pot over medium heat. Braising is just quickly browning the outside with higher heat.
This helps to lock in some of the juices and gives the outer slices a nice crusty texture (similar to when you grill).
After the Roast is sufficiently braised (maybe 5-10 minutes per side, don't worry about over braising it), lower the heat, add 1/2 to 1 cup of water, put the lid on it and roast it in the pot for about 20-30 minutes per lb.
Check the temp- if it is cooked enough, remove it from the pot and let it sit for about 15-20 minutes before you carve it. There will be plenty of au jus in the pot. I like the gravy thinner myself, but you can always add flour if you want to thicken it up. Definitely scrape the pot to get those little bits into the gravy.

very simple.


I've never tried 'baking' a prime rib- it seems like that would be a good way to dry the thing out (something you DO NOT want to do). If you were to 'bake' it, I would wrap it up in tin foil and and keep it in there the whole baking time. And if you do choose to wrap it in foil and roast it in the oven, I would still make some slices, put in the garlic or onion and then braise it before putting it in the oven.

good luck!
I think you mean you sear the meat first, then braise it. (searing is quick browning and braising is slow cooking in some form of liquid).

BTW, searing does not seal in juices. Searing does add a lot of flavor, but does not seal in anything. That is a myth.

One of the benefits of searing is a nice firm crust. However, you will lose this if you then braise it. You will still have the flavor, but not the firm crust.
Old 12-13-09, 09:09 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Alton Brown has a method on Food Tv.com (was also on his show years ago) that Ive used before that is great... It involves aging it and "drying" it out. Works great and is delicious.
Old 12-13-09, 09:24 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by crazyronin View Post
re·ceipt (r-st)
n.
1.
a. The act of receiving: We are in receipt of your letter.
b. The fact of being or having been received: They denied receipt of the shipment.
2. A quantity or amount received. Often used in the plural: cash receipts.
3. A written acknowledgment that a specified article, sum of money, or shipment of merchandise has been received.
4. A recipe.


It comes from the practice of not bringing your cook books into the kitchen, but copying the recipe on a piece of paper (receipt.)
Ok but who uses the word that way.
It doesn't matter, I shouldn't have brought it up.
oh well.
Old 12-13-09, 09:28 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

I got curious and looked up some recipes. It appears there's a method of cooking roasts that uses lower heat, like 250°. You can start it at 450° for the sear and then lower the temp to 250° for a more even cooking, expecially if most people like it the same way, like medium-rare.

I might try that method next time.
Old 12-13-09, 09:44 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by X View Post
I got curious and looked up some recipes. It appears there's a method of cooking roasts that uses lower heat, like 250°. You can start it at 450° for the sear and then lower the temp to 250° for a more even cooking, expecially if most people like it the same way, like medium-rare.

I might try that method next time.
If you look at Alton's way....he reverses that. Pretty much cooks it 100% at low temp and then 10 minutes or so at 500 to develop the crust.
Old 12-13-09, 09:57 PM
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Re: Prime Rib Advice

Originally Posted by Sdallnct View Post
If you look at Alton's way....he reverses that. Pretty much cooks it 100% at low temp and then 10 minutes or so at 500 to develop the crust.
I won't be looking at anything that freak does.

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