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Should I call this guy Doctor?

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Should I call this guy Doctor?

Old 09-17-08, 01:26 PM
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Should I call this guy Doctor?

My wife and I just started going to a chiropractor. He goes by the moniker Dr. I have thus far refused to refer to him as doctor as he does not have a PHD or a medical degree. He is supposedly a doctor of chiropractic care or something like that. Am I wrong here. Would you guys call him a doctor?
Old 09-17-08, 01:32 PM
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It all depends on the guy's last name. If it's Pepper, No or Zhivago for instance, I think you have to for comedy's sake. If it's Jekyll go with Doctor, if it's Hyde then don't.
Old 09-17-08, 01:39 PM
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The degree is indeed a Doctor of Chiropractic Medicine (DCM), so technically he is a "doctor". But much like those with Ph.D.s (me included), he is a fake doctor.
Old 09-17-08, 01:39 PM
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Is he a chiropractor or not? If he is, he holds a DC degree (Doctor of Chiropractic) and is called "Doctor".

Originally Posted by from Wikipedia
Graduates of chiropractic schools receive the degree Doctor of Chiropractic (DC), are referred to as "doctor", and are eligible to seek licensure in all jurisdictions.
Old 09-17-08, 01:40 PM
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Hell yeah. The chiropractor who straightened out my lower back and neck, I will call him DR every day of the week.
Old 09-17-08, 01:42 PM
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See if he prefers Maestro.
Old 09-17-08, 01:42 PM
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I call my chiropractor Kevin, but this may not work in your situation.
Old 09-17-08, 01:52 PM
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Your first mistake is going to a chiropracter. I wouldn't let those guys touch me (or my wallet) with a ten foot pole.

Go see a D.O. if you need that sort of care.
Old 09-17-08, 02:03 PM
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Doctor of Optometry? How would that help?
Old 09-17-08, 02:17 PM
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There's nothing magical about being a doctor. The status doesn't come with any qualification about the amount of school or the knowledge required to hold the title. All it means is that the person completed the highest level of education for his or her field.

So if you created a University of DVDTalk and had the only educational program in the world in "the Edit King", graduates of that program would be doctors, since they would be the world experts in the Edit King.

The only one that gets confusing is the JD. It's a doctorate degree (because it's a professional graduate degree with more work than a professional master's degree) but it's not the highest level of education in the legal field. So, even though someone with a JD has a doctorate, that person is generally not considered to be a doctor.

The medical profession avoided this issue by making the MD a terminal degree (although, in other countries, there are cases with medical doctors might hold a bachelor's degree. In those cases, sometimes the term "doctor" is used as a profession (like MC Hammer) for licensed medical professionals).
Old 09-17-08, 02:23 PM
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Yes.
Old 09-17-08, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Timber View Post
See if he prefers Maestro.
You beat me to it.
Old 09-17-08, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by mbs View Post
But much like those with Ph.D.s (me included), he is a fake doctor.
A PhD is not a "fake" doctor, but he/she is a doctor of philosophy, not medicine. In some cases, a PhD spends years longer acquiring his degree than an MD, studying something more challenging and recondite than medicine.
Old 09-17-08, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Lord Rick View Post
Your first mistake is going to a chiropracter. I wouldn't let those guys touch me (or my wallet) with a ten foot pole.

Go see a D.O. if you need that sort of care.
Well, it feels cool to have my parts cracked. Is that a good enough reason to keep going? I like the guy and his methods. He took multiple x-rays of us both and gave us a very sizable discount when we said we couldn't afford his price. I don't buy most of the supposed health benefits (some people think that proper alignment can prevent cancer and virtually all health problems), but I would rather have a straight spine than a crooked one.
Old 09-17-08, 02:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Norm de Plume View Post
In some cases, a PhD spends years longer acquiring his degree than an MD, studying something more challenging and recondite than medicine.
Challenging? In what way?
Old 09-17-08, 02:52 PM
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Lawyers have "Doctor of Laws" degrees but we are called esquire. If tradition dictates that someone with a certain degree be called "doctor" then it's really no different than the above.
Old 09-17-08, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by jonw9 View Post
Doctor of Optometry? How would that help?
Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine.
Old 09-17-08, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by orangecrush18 View Post
Well, it feels cool to have my parts cracked. Is that a good enough reason to keep going? I like the guy and his methods. He took multiple x-rays of us both and gave us a very sizable discount when we said we couldn't afford his price.
This is one of the most ridiculous paragraphs I have read in a long time.

It feels cool?

You like having xrays?

You like him?

He gave you a discount?
Old 09-17-08, 03:20 PM
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Well, your two very informative posts have convinced me Rick (I am not sure if you are really a Lord)!
Old 09-17-08, 03:24 PM
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I happen to think chiropractic is, for the most part, a scam except as treatment for injuries such as those sustained in accidents, which require acute care for a period of time only. People who use chiropractors as their primary care astound me, but since some chiropractors encourage their patients to do so, it's understandable, I guess.

My feminist principles cause me to bristle at calling someone "Doctor" if he is calling me by my first name, which every doctor I've ever gone to has routinely done. However, the fact that this person has the capacity to save or not save my life goes a long way toward mitigating any wounded pride on my part. Frankly, I have to wonder why you're going to the guy in the first place and trusting your spine to someone you feel is so poorly educated.
Old 09-17-08, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by jonw9 View Post
Well, your two very informative posts have convinced me Rick (I am not sure if you are really a Lord)!
Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) receives training very similar to that of a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.), but it is received in a different educational system entirely. The osteopathic system of education is sort of a bridge between traditional M.D. and chiropractic, with more emphasis on treating the "whole patient" and extended study of the musculoskeletal system. Just as with doctors, there are osteopathic hospitals just as there are traditional M.D.-focused hospitals, although you wouldn't know it unless you asked in most cases. Most hospitals will allow both D.O.s and M.D.s to practice in them.

My gynecologist is a D.O. and I have never had any complaints about the treatment I have received from him. I have had other doctors in the past who were D.O.s and could say the same about them. My best friend is a nurse practitioner who spent most of her early career in osteopathic hospitals and prefers them. On the other hand, my mother was an R.N. who expressed disdain for D.O.s and would only work with M.D.s unless she had no choice. So it's kind of who you ask that determines the answer you get.

Last edited by Vibiana; 09-17-08 at 03:32 PM.
Old 09-17-08, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Lord Rick View Post
This is one of the most ridiculous paragraphs I have read in a long time.

It feels cool?

You like having xrays?

You like him?

He gave you a discount?
I forgot that sarcasim is lost in the tubes of the internet. I should have put a next to the cool comment. Truth be told, I don't mind having the occasional xray. I do like him. Do you hate any of the professionals you give money to? I am a tight wad, so discounts go a long way with me
Old 09-17-08, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Vibiana View Post
I happen to think chiropractic is, for the most part, a scam except as treatment for injuries such as those sustained in accidents, which require acute care for a period of time only. People who use chiropractors as their primary care astound me, but since some chiropractors encourage their patients to do so, it's understandable, I guess.

My feminist principles cause me to bristle at calling someone "Doctor" if he is calling me by my first name, which every doctor I've ever gone to has routinely done. However, the fact that this person has the capacity to save or not save my life goes a long way toward mitigating any wounded pride on my part. Frankly, I have to wonder why you're going to the guy in the first place and trusting your spine to someone you feel is so poorly educated.
I don't think he is poorly educated, just didn't think the "Dr." should apply. I think I may have changed my mind about that though.
Old 09-17-08, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Vibiana View Post
Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) receives training very similar to that of a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.), but it is received in a different educational system entirely. The osteopathic system of education is sort of a bridge between traditional M.D. and chiropractic, with more emphasis on treating the "whole patient" and extended study of the musculoskeletal system. Just as with doctors, there are osteopathic hospitals just as there are traditional M.D.-focused hospitals, although you wouldn't know it unless you asked in most cases. Most hospitals will allow both D.O.s and M.D.s to practice in them.

My gynecologist is a D.O. and I have never had any complaints about the treatment I have received from him. I have had other doctors in the past who were D.O.s and could say the same about them. My best friend is a nurse practitioner who spent most of her early career in osteopathic hospitals and prefers them. On the other hand, my mother was an R.N. who expressed disdain for D.O.s and would only work with M.D.s unless she had no choice. So it's kind of who you ask that determines the answer you get.
I have never heard of a D.O. before. They sound like a good option. Maybe I can convince my wife to kick our "Doctor" to the curb.
Old 09-17-08, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Lord Rick View Post
Your first mistake is going to a chiropracter. I wouldn't let those guys touch me (or my wallet) with a ten foot pole.
Ditto. I would suggest a Physical Therapist.

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