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Anyone adopt a Greyhound?

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Anyone adopt a Greyhound?

Old 02-03-08, 01:01 PM
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Anyone adopt a Greyhound?

My friend got one Friday from a foster mom. It's his first dog ever. I haven't had a dog since I was a little kid, so I'm not much help.

The 2 year old dog is scared to death of Jeff. Doesn't want to eat. Stays in his crate. Pissed in the house. Anyway, he is feeling like he is living with a roommate that hates him. And feeling guilty as well.

Any advice from greyhound owners or adopters?
Old 02-03-08, 01:14 PM
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My cousin adopted one and it has a number tattooed in its ear so it was a racing dog. It seemed skittish at times but overall it had an even temperment. I think it sleeps a lot. They got it a doggie bed because they have hardwood floors and the greyhound has no fat (padding) on its body. I think she tries to take the dog on a daily walk per the recommendation below.
Although greyhounds are extremely fast and athletic, and despite their reputation as racing dogs, they are not high-energy dogs. They are sprinters, and although they love running, they do not require extensive exercise. Most are quiet, gentle animals. An adult greyhound will stay healthy and happy with a daily walk of as little as 20 to 30 minutes. Greyhounds are often referred to as "Forty-five mile per hour couch potatoes."

Greyhound owners and adoption groups generally consider Greyhounds to be wonderful pets.[8] They are pack-oriented dogs which means that they will quickly adopt human into their pack as alpha. They can get along well with children, dogs and other family pets (though are sometimes not safe with smaller pet animals or untrained children).[9] Rescued racing Greyhounds occasionally develop separation anxiety when re-housed or when their new owners have to leave them alone for a period of time (the addition of a second greyhound often solves this problem).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greyhound
Old 02-03-08, 01:30 PM
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When it comes time to get a new dog, I'll be adopting one of these. I've met a few people who have adopted greyhounds, and the dogs are just so sweet and gentle.

I think with the OP, you just need to spend a bit of time with the dog - take it out for walks, talk to it (seriously), pet it as much as you can. Let the dog get used to your touch, your voice and give it some exercise to get it's anxiety and stress out a bit. The dog should relax around you eventually.
Old 02-03-08, 01:32 PM
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Watch the Dog Whisperer. Plenty of good tips.
Old 02-03-08, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by spainlinx0
Watch the Dog Whisperer. Plenty of good tips.


Psshhhht *pinches spainlinx0 on the neck*
Old 02-03-08, 01:52 PM
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Bribery. Works with kids, adults and dogs...but not on cats, they're too smart.
Old 02-03-08, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by MBoyd
My friend got one Friday from a foster mom. It's his first dog ever. I haven't had a dog since I was a little kid, so I'm not much help.

The 2 year old dog is scared to death of Jeff. Doesn't want to eat. Stays in his crate. Pissed in the house. Anyway, he is feeling like he is living with a roommate that hates him. And feeling guilty as well.

Any advice from greyhound owners or adopters?
Have him throw in a stinky, well worn, dirty sweatshirt or something into the dog's crate, so that the dog begins to associate the smell of him with something "safe".
Old 02-03-08, 02:51 PM
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^ awesome. THANKS! He has been trying all other suggestions. Thanks everyone.

Here is the Boomer's pic.

Old 02-03-08, 03:03 PM
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I'm probably going to get a dog very soon after finishing up college, and it'll likely be a greyhound.
Old 02-03-08, 03:08 PM
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Any Greyhound is better than this STINKY one:
Old 02-03-08, 08:44 PM
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I have adopted two retired racers, and I will be adopting again before long. First off, good for your friend! These are simply wonderful dogs.

However, it sounds like your friend didn't get much support or instruction, and it's true, there can be issues because the dogs are coming from an environment totally different than a home environment. Many rescues transition the dogs through foster care, and though your friend's dog came from a foster house, perhaps the dog was 'new' and sent there straight from the track. Dogs coming right from the track take time to settle into a home, because it's a brave new world for them. Please let him know that it will take some time and patience, but that these dogs are so worth it!

I'm certainly no expert, but maybe I can impart some helpful information. If your friend worked with some agency or rescue, he should get in touch with them and get all the information he can. It's odd for adopters to just be thrown into the pool with no swimming lessons, as it were. The agency ought to have plenty of tips on getting the dog settled in, as well as recommendations on good foods, suitable vets, etc.

Here is a link to the 'owner's manual' used by the rescue agency I have used in the past.

The main thing for your friend to keep in mind--the house is likely a new and alien environment for the dog.

Racers live in their crates, basically, and so the crate is a secure and safe place for him. Your friend might best leave the crate open and available to the dog, and let him come in and out of it as he pleases--he'll get brave enough to venture out, but he may also like to spend time inside it. It's his den. Greyhounds are often called '40 mile an hour couch potatoes' because, though they do enjoy getting out to run and get some exercise, they spend a lot of time snoozing. (And they fold up suprisingly small! I've occasionally come back to bed to discover a lanky, 65 lb dog folded up small enough to sleep on my pillow. Dog-igami?)

They don't generally come housetrained, because they don't live in a home environment. The dog is likely 'crate trained' and won't mess up his own crate. This is a good jumping off point for housetraining. I have found that keeping the dog on a schedule is very helpful.

If your friend has stairs in his house, the dog may need to be taught how to navigate them. Again, not something they generally have to deal with at the track.

Greyhounds should wear special nylon slip collars that tighten if they pull away. See, if a grey spots something interesting--especially if the grey has a high prey drive and a strong instinct to chase--they can be gone in seconds. They are fast critters! Again, if he is working with an agency or a rescue, they should be able to provide these collars. A soft plastic racing muzzle is also a useful thing to have. The dogs are accustomed to these muzzles, which are not at all tight, but more like roomy cages around their faces. They aren't something often needed, but sometimes they might be used as a precaution if the dog is going to be around small animals (like cats). Though many greys are perfectly cat friendly, some have such strong prey drives that any fast little animal will trigger their instincts.

As for food, it may be a matter of strange new food in a scary new place. Once the dog starts to relax a little, and gets used to the new cuisine, he will hopefully start eating.

Hmmmm..another thing your friend should think about is finding a vet who is knowledgeable about greyhounds. If the dog ever needs anesthesia, it can be tricky for greys, so vets should be aware of this and be prepared to deal with a grey. Luckily, greyhounds are often used as blood donors and for other vet training, so most vets should at least have some knowledge of their special needs.

I hope your friend and his new buddy Boomer (beautiful boy that he is!) will soon be settled in together. Greyhounds are such wonderful dogs, and I just can't express how much I have loved mine. They were both senior girls, both in their last days, but what sweet days they were! I will never forget Tigger or Happy Cakes.

Best wishes to your friend and Boomer!
Old 02-03-08, 10:03 PM
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Your friend may want to browse www.greytalk.com also which is a pretty good greyhound board. I am sure they would be more than willing to help walk them through it.
Old 02-03-08, 10:15 PM
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a woman who lives near me has 2 rescues... she walks them and i get to meet the dogs...

they are terrific animals...

your friend just needs to give it time... that animal is going through 'the new kid in town, the new kid in school, the new kid in the family', squared, and all at once...

he'll come around...
Old 02-04-08, 09:55 AM
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My sister adopted two Greyhounds and I have fallen in love with them. When my current dog (a 15 year old Rott/Lab mix) passes, I will be adopting two Greyhounds.

The Grehound rescue that my sister got hers from suggested that she get two if she could because Greyhounds are used to being around other Greyhounds and oftentimes suffer separation anxiety.

One her Greyhounds has always been, and continues to be a finicky eater and is still a bit skittish around people (even after two years in a home environment) although she's getting more and more used to the home environment.

A schedule is very important for feeding and taking them out, and it's best to leave the crate up until the dog gets used to its surroundings. My sister was finally able to remove the crate late last year (after having the dogs for about 1.5 years).

They are very good dogs, rarely bark, and they have very even tempers.

I wish your friend the best with their new dog. Just be patient and it will all work out ok.
Old 02-04-08, 03:02 PM
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Can't you lure it out the cage with a loud noise and a rabbit on a stick?
Old 02-04-08, 03:04 PM
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There's a local place that does these adoptions, and talking to other Greyhound owners they're great dogs. I've wanted to go this route a long time, but my wife is skeptical about a big dog.
Old 02-04-08, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Groucho
There's a local place that does these adoptions, and talking to other Greyhound owners they're great dogs. I've wanted to go this route a long time, but my wife is skeptical about a big dog.

plus, they generally piss all over women (not sure if that's a good thing) and are often covered in spiders.
Old 02-04-08, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by corsairp47
I have adopted two retired racers, and I will be adopting again before long. First off, good for your friend! These are simply wonderful dogs.

However, it sounds like your friend didn't get much support or instruction, and it's true, there can be issues because the dogs are coming from an environment totally different than a home environment. Many rescues transition the dogs through foster care, and though your friend's dog came from a foster house, perhaps the dog was 'new' and sent there straight from the track. Dogs coming right from the track take time to settle into a home, because it's a brave new world for them. Please let him know that it will take some time and patience, but that these dogs are so worth it!

I'm certainly no expert, but maybe I can impart some helpful information. If your friend worked with some agency or rescue, he should get in touch with them and get all the information he can. It's odd for adopters to just be thrown into the pool with no swimming lessons, as it were. The agency ought to have plenty of tips on getting the dog settled in, as well as recommendations on good foods, suitable vets, etc.

Here is a link to the 'owner's manual' used by the rescue agency I have used in the past.

The main thing for your friend to keep in mind--the house is likely a new and alien environment for the dog.

Racers live in their crates, basically, and so the crate is a secure and safe place for him. Your friend might best leave the crate open and available to the dog, and let him come in and out of it as he pleases--he'll get brave enough to venture out, but he may also like to spend time inside it. It's his den. Greyhounds are often called '40 mile an hour couch potatoes' because, though they do enjoy getting out to run and get some exercise, they spend a lot of time snoozing. (And they fold up suprisingly small! I've occasionally come back to bed to discover a lanky, 65 lb dog folded up small enough to sleep on my pillow. Dog-igami?)

They don't generally come housetrained, because they don't live in a home environment. The dog is likely 'crate trained' and won't mess up his own crate. This is a good jumping off point for housetraining. I have found that keeping the dog on a schedule is very helpful.

If your friend has stairs in his house, the dog may need to be taught how to navigate them. Again, not something they generally have to deal with at the track.

Greyhounds should wear special nylon slip collars that tighten if they pull away. See, if a grey spots something interesting--especially if the grey has a high prey drive and a strong instinct to chase--they can be gone in seconds. They are fast critters! Again, if he is working with an agency or a rescue, they should be able to provide these collars. A soft plastic racing muzzle is also a useful thing to have. The dogs are accustomed to these muzzles, which are not at all tight, but more like roomy cages around their faces. They aren't something often needed, but sometimes they might be used as a precaution if the dog is going to be around small animals (like cats). Though many greys are perfectly cat friendly, some have such strong prey drives that any fast little animal will trigger their instincts.

As for food, it may be a matter of strange new food in a scary new place. Once the dog starts to relax a little, and gets used to the new cuisine, he will hopefully start eating.

Hmmmm..another thing your friend should think about is finding a vet who is knowledgeable about greyhounds. If the dog ever needs anesthesia, it can be tricky for greys, so vets should be aware of this and be prepared to deal with a grey. Luckily, greyhounds are often used as blood donors and for other vet training, so most vets should at least have some knowledge of their special needs.

I hope your friend and his new buddy Boomer (beautiful boy that he is!) will soon be settled in together. Greyhounds are such wonderful dogs, and I just can't express how much I have loved mine. They were both senior girls, both in their last days, but what sweet days they were! I will never forget Tigger or Happy Cakes.

Best wishes to your friend and Boomer!

Excellent and informative post. I just bumped this previous thread on the subject to find out if the owner went through with the adoption, but you also may be able to find more information here.

http://forum.dvdtalk.com/showthread.php?t=515093

One of our grey's was similar to what you're describing, but she has really come out of her shell. It took about 4 months for her to get comfortable in our home.
Old 02-07-08, 09:41 PM
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There's a great site called iggyplanet.com that you could go for help. It's really for Italian Greyhounds but you'll find a lot of Grey owners there and all the advice you'll ever need. Please sign up there!

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