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Withdrawal from painkillers - what does it feel like?

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Withdrawal from painkillers - what does it feel like?

Old 04-10-07, 02:10 AM
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Withdrawal from painkillers - what does it feel like?

You always hear about celebrities who get addicted to prescription painkillers (Matthew Perry, Michael Jackson), then when they stop they go through painful withdrawal.

My question is - does anyone know what the pain feels like, exactly, from withdrawal from Vicadin, which seems to be the most popular?
Old 04-10-07, 02:14 AM
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A close family member had to go through withdrawals (Valium,Vicodin) while in the hospital, and from what they described it sounded like you feel your going to die.
Old 04-10-07, 10:59 AM
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The symptoms of Vicodin withdrawal include but are not limited to:

restlessness

muscle pain

bone pain

insomnia

diarrhea

vomiting

cold flashes

goose bumps

involuntary leg movements

watery eyes

runny nose

loss of appetite

irritability

panic

nausea

chills

sweating
Old 04-10-07, 11:03 AM
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It feels like having your upper lip pulled backwards over your head until it touches the back of your neck.
Old 04-10-07, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Vibiana
It feels like having your upper lip pulled backwards over your head until it touches the back of your neck.
No Vibs...that's what childbirth feels like.
Old 04-10-07, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Vibiana
It feels like having your upper lip pulled backwards over your head until it touches the back of your neck.
NO it doesn't.
Old 04-10-07, 11:39 AM
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Depends on which pain killers. One time I was in the hospital and I was on the morphine drip. When I got home, I could tell I was going through withdrawal, I was really cranky and edgy, and my body was telling me to supply it with more opiates.
I got Vicodine when I broke my hand, they were okay, but the high was not as good as percoset, and they are not as addicting, IMO.
When I got my wisdom teeth taken out they gave me percosets, after I was through I really craved more, luckily for me they rarely give refills.
Now If you're on oxycontin, which is a percoset X 16, I'm sure the withdrawal symptoms would be a lot crazier, also depends on how long you've been doing them. Remember these synthetic opiates are just like heroin, and can be just as addicting. I would imagine it could be quite painful like heroin withdrawal.
Old 04-10-07, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Sonicflood


The symptoms of Vicodin withdrawal include but are not limited to:

restlessness

muscle pain

bone pain

insomnia

diarrhea

vomiting

cold flashes

goose bumps

involuntary leg movements

watery eyes

runny nose

loss of appetite

irritability

panic

nausea

chills

sweating
So basically it's like listening to a Robin Thicke CD
Old 04-10-07, 12:06 PM
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No chance it's difficult to quit anything.

Except the gym.
Old 04-10-07, 12:44 PM
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I wouldn't know since these painkillers do nothing for me.

I have had percocet, oxycontin, vicodin, tylenol w/codine over the years for surgery and/or dental work.

I every case, even taking more than the recommended dosage did little for me or to me.
Old 04-10-07, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Shannon
I wouldn't know since these painkillers do nothing for me.

I have had percocet, oxycontin, vicodin, tylenol w/codine over the years for surgery and/or dental work.

I every case, even taking more than the recommended dosage did little for me or to me.
Dr. House? thanks for posting here
Old 04-10-07, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian Shannon
I wouldn't know since these painkillers do nothing for me.
I've had limited experience and I never took more than prescribed, but I have the same thing happen to me. Usually I take the first few after getting home, then stop because they don't seem to work.

On another note... why do people come off addictive substances cold turkey? I mean, if it was me, I'd quit gradually over a period of time. For instance, when I give up caffeine annually (for lent), I don't just quit cold turkey. I ramp down coffee consumption, then switch to black tea, then switch to lower caffeine tea, then caffeine free tea, and then nothing. It works really well and eliminates the withdrawl symptoms I used to get (restlessness, irritability, shakes, etc).
Old 04-10-07, 02:33 PM
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Bone pain? Yeesh.
Old 04-10-07, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by matta

On another note... why do people come off addictive substances cold turkey? I mean, if it was me, I'd quit gradually over a period of time.
We just had this in Pharm.

2 reasons:

1. Cold turkey makes the abstinence syndrome shorter (though more intense). With a long abstinence syndrome (i.e. cutting down slowly) you feel awful for a long time. So addicts would rather get it over with.

2. Drug users build up tolerance, which means more drug to get the same effect. This gets expensive with say, heroin. So, the user goes thru withdrawal to reset his tolerance back to people like you and me. The faster he can get back to no tolerance, the faster he can get back to getting high for cheap.
Old 04-10-07, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Trelach24
No chance it's difficult to quit anything.

Except the gym.

Old 04-10-07, 04:54 PM
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Paging joltaddict to thread # 497 --

Wait. You want to know what it's like to stop taking painkillers?

Never mind, then.
Old 04-10-07, 05:24 PM
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Butt sex.
Old 04-10-07, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Buttmunker
Withdrawal from painkillers - what does it feel like?
Warm apple pie.
Old 04-10-07, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Lord Rick
We just had this in Pharm.

2 reasons:

1. Cold turkey makes the abstinence syndrome shorter (though more intense). With a long abstinence syndrome (i.e. cutting down slowly) you feel awful for a long time. So addicts would rather get it over with.
This doesn't make any sense to me. Sure, you'll get over the addiction faster, but because of the increased intensity, you'll be more prone to relapse.

For instance, if I quit coffee cold turkey after a long time of 4 cups/day, I quit functioning for like a week and I crave it. This makes me believe that I need coffee. If something important comes up that requires me to be at the top of my game, I'm probably going to relapse, at least for that event. On the other hand, if I cut down gradually, I'm slightly affected over the weaning-off period. Because I'm only slightly affected and not significantly affected, if something comes up during that period, I'm less prone to relapse.

If you believe it's a linear relationship between withdrawl symptom intensity and relapse, then I guess it doesn't matter if you choose short-intense or long-subtle, but my hunch is that the relationship is exponential in nature, which would mean that a less intense weaning-off would decrease the chance of relapse. Any word in the Pharm class on that relationship?
Old 04-10-07, 07:27 PM
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I used to smoke over a pack a day, and I found it easier to quit cold turkey--just committing and getting it over with was a lot of the battle.
Old 04-10-07, 07:31 PM
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Fuck it , works for House keep taking them I say.
Old 04-10-07, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by matta
This doesn't make any sense to me. Sure, you'll get over the addiction faster, but because of the increased intensity, you'll be more prone to relapse.

For instance, if I quit coffee cold turkey after a long time of 4 cups/day, I quit functioning for like a week and I crave it. This makes me believe that I need coffee. If something important comes up that requires me to be at the top of my game, I'm probably going to relapse, at least for that event. On the other hand, if I cut down gradually, I'm slightly affected over the weaning-off period. Because I'm only slightly affected and not significantly affected, if something comes up during that period, I'm less prone to relapse.

If you believe it's a linear relationship between withdrawl symptom intensity and relapse, then I guess it doesn't matter if you choose short-intense or long-subtle, but my hunch is that the relationship is exponential in nature, which would mean that a less intense weaning-off would decrease the chance of relapse. Any word in the Pharm class on that relationship?
Wow!!! Glad I have never even tasted coffee. Sounds like a bitch to get the monkey off your back.

Old 04-11-07, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by matta
If you believe it's a linear relationship between withdrawl symptom intensity and relapse, then I guess it doesn't matter if you choose short-intense or long-subtle, but my hunch is that the relationship is exponential in nature, which would mean that a less intense weaning-off would decrease the chance of relapse. Any word in the Pharm class on that relationship?
The quality of the abstinence syndrome doesn't have much effect on "addictability" of a substance.

It's important to separate physical dependence from addiction. They aren't related. Amphetamines are strongly addicting, but don't cause physical dependence. Heroin is strongly addicting, and does cause physical dependence.

Addiction is very strongly correlated with how fast the drug gets to your brain (how lipid-soluble it is). So a drug that gives you a very quick, very intense hit is very addictive. That's why crack cocaine is much more addictive than "regular" cocaine.

You aren't addicted to caffeine. You become physically dependent, but caffeine is not addictive.

Last edited by Lord Rick; 04-11-07 at 10:52 AM.
Old 04-11-07, 11:29 AM
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I'm physically dependent on cigarettes, and I'm addicted.
Old 04-11-07, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by leest3
I'm physically dependent on cigarettes, and I'm addicted.
That is true. Nicotine produces both addiction and physical dependence.

Some argue that nicotine is as addictive as heroin.

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