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SMB-IL 04-04-07 11:55 AM

Grammar Police needed!
 
We're having an issue with an employee who is using terminology like "on tomorrow", "on yesterday" or even "on today" in emails to customers. I've searched around the net for an hour looking for a definitive reason why this usage is incorrect and can't find one. The employee doesn't speak like this, just writing.

"On Tuesday", "on March 21st" and "on the 12th of Never" are all correct, but "on tomorrow" isn't. Can anyone explain why???

Bronkster 04-04-07 11:58 AM

is he British?

SMB-IL 04-04-07 12:03 PM

No, not British.

Numanoid 04-04-07 12:09 PM

I don't get it. Give us some complete sentences that he uses.

SMB-IL 04-04-07 12:18 PM

Jeff,

XYZ load cancelled on yesterday and rescheduled for today.... is there a second trailer on tomorrow?

Thanks,
Jack

VinVega 04-04-07 12:23 PM

Clearly, "on tomorrow" is incorrect. The proper use of the term is "in tomorrow."

Stupid morans. -ohbfrank-

jeffkjoe 04-04-07 12:40 PM


Originally Posted by SMB-IL
Jeff,

XYZ load cancelled on yesterday and rescheduled for today.... is there a second trailer on tomorrow?

Thanks,
Jack



Normally, "today" and "tomorrow" are used as single-word ADVERBS, not as the objects of prepositions as your grammatically-challenged friend does.

obscurelabel 04-04-07 12:43 PM

Well, just my uninformed opinion, but the words "today", "tomorrow", and "yesterday" all have an implied preposition in their construction (towards [the current] day, towards the morrow[morn], the previous day [yester=obsolete word for previous]) so the additional "on" isn't necessary and these words can be used alone.

Also, I'm sure I could think of some non-standard usage that wouldn't be able to be proved wrong by example, simply because no one had used it before. I have never heard of anyone using the phrase "on tomorrow".

Drexl 04-04-07 12:45 PM

Yeah, it's just not right.

Hey, that reminds me; it's Wednesday. "Lost" is on tonight, and "Scrubs" is on tomorrow.

SMB-IL 04-04-07 01:11 PM


Originally Posted by obscurelabel
Well, just my uninformed opinion, but the words "today", "tomorrow", and "yesterday" all have an implied preposition in their construction (towards [the current] day, towards the morrow[morn], the previous day [yester=obsolete word for previous]) so the additional "on" isn't necessary and these words can be used alone.

Also, I'm sure I could think of some non-standard usage that wouldn't be able to be proved wrong by example, simply because no one had used it before. I have never heard of anyone using the phrase "on tomorrow".

I like this explanation the best! I'm using it!

SMB-IL 04-04-07 01:13 PM


Originally Posted by Drexl
Yeah, it's just not right.

Hey, that reminds me; it's Wednesday. "Lost" is on tonight, and "Scrubs" is on tomorrow.

Wait, aren't the "on"s in these constructions adverbs to "is" and not prepositions to "tonight" or "tomorrow"?

Bronkster 04-04-07 01:17 PM


Originally Posted by Drexl
Yeah, it's just not right.

Hey, that reminds me; it's Wednesday. "Lost" is on tonight, and "Scrubs" is on tomorrow.

-ohbfrank- Lost be tonight, Scrubs be tomorrow. Sheesh!

satellite 04-04-07 01:22 PM

I used to have an employee that used the term "per se" in all KINDS of weird contexts and ways. I was so happy when she moved on and I didn't have to cringe every time I talked to her.

Now I work with a guy who ends all of his sentences with "as well, too" - which I believe is redundantly redundant.

crazyronin 04-04-07 04:39 PM


Originally Posted by SMB-IL
Jeff,

XYZ load cancelled on yesterday and rescheduled for today.... is there a second trailer on tomorrow?

Thanks,
Jack

Sounds like Jack is dropping his "for"s.


Originally Posted by Jack
is there a second trailer on for tomorrow?

Look better? I'd beat him to death until he gets him some learning.

Morf 04-04-07 04:48 PM

You say "an employee" ... as in "your employee"? Are you the boss? If so, just tell him that proper grammar will be defined by you, the boss. Suck it.

bunkaroo 04-04-07 05:01 PM

Funny, I work with someone who does the same thing. She always sounds very thoughtful and smart.....and then that pops out and you start to wonder.

Norm de Plume 04-05-07 09:55 PM


Originally Posted by SMB-IL
I like this explanation the best! I'm using it!

You mean, you "like that explanation the most", not the best. Alternatively, you "think that explanation is the best".

Bacon 04-05-07 10:41 PM

He beez usin dis yo!!!!!!
http://www.somethingsowrong.com/images/wordyo.jpg


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