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Why do Brits say someone is "in hospital"

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Why do Brits say someone is "in hospital"

Old 04-03-07, 01:22 PM
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Why do Brits say someone is "in hospital"

while American say someone is "in the hospital"
Old 04-03-07, 01:23 PM
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Because there's only one hospital in America.
Old 04-03-07, 01:25 PM
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because the less words spoken, American's can understand what Brits are actually saying...
Old 04-03-07, 01:35 PM
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Because that's the way they learned when they were at university.
Old 04-03-07, 01:45 PM
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I blame Star Trek: Enterprise.

The Enterprise was good enough for Kirk and Picard, dammit!

I want my "the" back!!

Last edited by adamblast; 04-03-07 at 01:49 PM.
Old 04-03-07, 01:46 PM
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They're in hospital while on holiday from university.
Old 04-03-07, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by cungar
while American say someone is "in the hospital"
Because they do.
Old 04-03-07, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Vibiana
Because that's the way they learned when they were at university.
That's not the same, actually. They just say "university" instead of "college" - otherwise the usage is the same. The one that jumped to my mind was "on holiday" but again, they are just saying "holiday" instead of "vacation."

To answer the original question - I don't know. Brits are weird.
Old 04-03-07, 01:49 PM
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Maybe they drank too much at prom?
Old 04-03-07, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Draven
Brits are weird.
Indeed. When I was over there I was constantly having to yell at them "Speak English, dammit!"
Old 04-03-07, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Randy Miller III
Maybe they drank too much at prom?
Perfect example of a usage that's in the middle of changing. Where did I just see this example lately? Was it around here?
Old 04-03-07, 01:54 PM
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Why do they watch "sport" instead of "sports"?

Why do they study "maths" instead of "math"?
Old 04-03-07, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Groucho
Indeed. When I was over there I was constantly having to yell at them "Speak English, dammit!"
A bunch of the British people I met were enchanted with what they called my "American accent." I set their limey asses straight right off and told them THEY were the ones with the accent.
Old 04-03-07, 02:02 PM
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I actually have an extra "the" lying around here somewhere. When I caught the gay, I thought it might come in handy.
Old 04-03-07, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by wergo
Why do they watch "sport" instead of "sports"?

Why do they study "maths" instead of "math"?

so you fancy a bit of sport?
Old 04-03-07, 02:08 PM
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Fun little phrases I used to adore hearing my British girlfriend Shelly say (other than "c'mere, love," of course ):

"well, blow me down"
"cor blimey"
"could do"
"knackered"
"gobsmacked"
"so I told the bloke to naff off"

Old 04-03-07, 02:10 PM
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It's all part of the British Language Compensation Agreement - In order to be able to add the stray "U" to various words, language balance required they drop the "the" from other areas of speech.
Old 04-03-07, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Vibiana

"well, blow me down"
"cor blimey"
"could do"
"knackered"
"gobsmacked"
"so I told the bloke to naff off"

Other than the first one, which I learned from Popeye, all the others I learned from Get Fuzzy.
Old 04-03-07, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by adamblast
Perfect example of a usage that's in the middle of changing. Where did I just see this example lately? Was it around here?
Yeah, my smart remark was in reference to this thread.
Old 04-03-07, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Bronkster
Other than the first one, which I learned from Popeye, all the others I learned from Get Fuzzy.
Well, you were obviously more fortunate than I. Not having cable, I had to snare me a real live Brit to teach me, instead. (She taught me some other stuff too, but we're not going into that here except to say that I will never again hear Paul Revere story and the phrase "The British are coming" without smirking ... ...)
Old 04-03-07, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Vibiana
Fun little phrases I used to adore hearing my British girlfriend Shelly say (other than "c'mere, love," of course ):

"well, blow me down"
"cor blimey"
"could do"
"knackered"
"gobsmacked"
"so I told the bloke to naff off"

No "G'day Guv'ner"?
Old 04-03-07, 02:15 PM
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My favorite usage is the word "expired" instead of "died." I don't know, but it adds not so much a comical touch as much as it seems to lessen the blow.
Old 04-03-07, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Eplicon
My favorite usage is the word "expired" instead of "died." I don't know, but it adds not so much a comical touch as much as it seems to lessen the blow.

Personally, I like "tits up"
Old 04-03-07, 02:28 PM
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For ages Americans didn't have any idea what a "queue" was, but I guess it's morphed into a common enough tech word that people know a queue is a line now...

But it's another odd usage to our ears: in Britian people stand "on queue" or "on line" instead of "in a line."
Old 04-03-07, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Talkin2Phil
Personally, I like "tits up"
Which is, of course, how you end up if you fall arse over elbow.

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