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Is it ever ok not to give 2 weeks notice?

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Is it ever ok not to give 2 weeks notice?

Old 12-28-06, 11:12 AM
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Is it ever ok not to give 2 weeks notice?

Here's my situation: been at my current job a year, call center, decent job. Interviewed for a job Tuesday, looks very promising. The problem is the job starts on Tuesday, January 2nd. I should hear about their decision today, but that gives me less than a week's notice at my current job. The new job is for a much better company (more avenues for advancement), a better job, better hours and a 25% pay raise. It's also a situation where they don't hire for this position very often, so if I miss this start date, there is no telling when the next opportunity would come up.

Thoughts?
Old 12-28-06, 11:13 AM
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Take it - give as much notice as you can.....
Old 12-28-06, 11:13 AM
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If the two weeks clause isn't in your contract, I think you're fine. I think it's more of a courtesy to anything, and for your particular position in a call center as one of several employees doing pretty much the same job, I think you're fine. It's considerate of you, however, to give this thought.
Old 12-28-06, 11:15 AM
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And when you get a new, better job in a few years, remember that this place didn't allow you to give 2 weeks notice to your last employer.
Old 12-28-06, 11:15 AM
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Call Centers are notorious for making the lives of their employees miserable, so I wouldn't give notice. It's not as if I'd want to go back to that job.
Old 12-28-06, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by dogmatica
If the two weeks clause isn't in your contract, I think you're fine. I think it's more of a courtesy to anything, and for your particular position in a call center as one of several employees doing pretty much the same job, I think you're fine. It's considerate of you, however, to give this thought.

My thoughts exactly. Two weeks' notice isn't required unless you have a contract specifying a notice timeframe. It's a nice thing to do if you can, but you have to look out for your own interests first - just as your current employers would look out for their interests if they decided they had to reduce their workforce in a hurry.
Old 12-28-06, 11:42 AM
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If you were being fired they wouldn't give you two weeks notice.
Old 12-28-06, 12:03 PM
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Give 2 weeks if you can.....but unless it is in writing, fuck'em, they'd fire you without notice if they had to.

-p
Old 12-28-06, 12:18 PM
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When I haven't been able to give two weeks, I usually make it a point to offer to go out of my way to assist with the transition. I guess a lot of it depends on how specialized your job and unique your work load is, but I find that offering to come in for one or two saturdays (at a much higher independent contractor rate, naturally) to train my replacement is usually well received.
Old 12-28-06, 12:38 PM
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There have been times where the job I was going into wanted me to start right away...I told them, I would like to give my current job 2 weeks as a courtesy and used the "if I was leaving here, wouldnt you want the same courtesy" type comment with the new place. It usually works. But if you cant, you just cant. Just wouldnt want you to possibly hurt your chances with the old job based on this.
Old 12-28-06, 12:45 PM
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I would be skeptical about any company I would be working for if they refused to allow me to give 2 weeks notice at my current job. Not saying I wouldn't take the job - only I would look at the company and position a bit more closely.
Old 12-28-06, 12:47 PM
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Not giving 2 weeks notice means you probably can't use them in the future as a reference, and you probably can't work for them again. That's it.

Giving them 1 week would change the above to maybe.
Old 12-28-06, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Bruce
I would be skeptical about any company I would be working for if they refused to allow me to give 2 weeks notice at my current job. Not saying I wouldn't take the job - only I would look at the company and position a bit more closely.
This is a huge nationally known insurance company. The problem is it's a training class, and due to the holiday I couldn't interview until Tuesday.
Old 12-28-06, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by BigPete
When I haven't been able to give two weeks, I usually make it a point to offer to go out of my way to assist with the transition. I guess a lot of it depends on how specialized your job and unique your work load is, but I find that offering to come in for one or two saturdays (at a much higher independent contractor rate, naturally) to train my replacement is usually well received.
Excellent recommendation here. Give 1 week notice or whatever notice you can and let them you are willing to work overtime or do whatever it takes in your last week to get someone trained up, process manuals written, etc. It's a great way to avoid burning a bridge.
Old 12-28-06, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Quake1028
This is a huge nationally known insurance company. The problem is it's a training class, and due to the holiday I couldn't interview until Tuesday.

if it's progressive, they are the evil
Old 12-28-06, 01:05 PM
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Give 2 weeks notice, but call in sick for the entire second week!
Old 12-28-06, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by BigPete
When I haven't been able to give two weeks, I usually make it a point to offer to go out of my way to assist with the transition. I guess a lot of it depends on how specialized your job and unique your work load is, but I find that offering to come in for one or two saturdays (at a much higher independent contractor rate, naturally) to train my replacement is usually well received.
Another to this excellent answer.

You really want to leave a job in the best terms possible. Phrases like "don't burn bridges" or "never cut what you can untie" come to mind.
Old 12-28-06, 03:30 PM
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That would be great advice if my job was important, but really it isn't. Even though I am in a 2 person department, someone else can be plugged in with little to no effort and get started up. It won't run as smoothly at first as I have it running, but it shouldn't suffer much.
Old 12-28-06, 04:14 PM
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A friend worked for a company that would not pay people for the weeks they gave after the notice. He quit the day his check was deposited, gave no notice.
My brother was going back to grad-school, gave a few months notice that he would no longer be able to work fulltime but work part-time. They fired him before the yearly bonuses, and still wanted him to work part-time after that. Whats funny is that noone gives notices at this place anymore, they shot themselves in the foot.
So yes it is ok not to give a 2 week notice in my opinion.
Old 12-28-06, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by al_bundy
if it's progressive, they are the evil
&

I once worked for Saks Fifth Avenue over there in BH (way back when), and when a friend found a better job and he gave them the 2 weeks thing, they FIRED him on the spot.

Ya just never know how some folks will react.

Anyway,

Here's wishin' you the Very Best of Everything in all that you do...



-Paul

Last edited by The Edit King; 12-28-06 at 04:24 PM. Reason: Because that's what I do.
Old 12-28-06, 04:42 PM
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I gave my last employer 4 day's notice. They were pissed, but considering how bored I was there it was just as well. That was the employer that wanted me to quit the job I had at the time and start working for them the second they called me (lunchtime). So in essence they wanted me to give my employer at the time four hour's notice.

Turnabout's fair play.
Old 12-28-06, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by mh4268
A friend worked for a company that would not pay people for the weeks they gave after the notice. He quit the day his check was deposited, gave no notice.
That's illegal (assuming you're in the US). Once you give notice, they cannot fire you in retaliation. They can tell you to leave on the spot, then pay you until your resignation date, but they can't fire you without pay once you give notice.

But I concur with what's been said already. Give as much notice as you can, go out of your way to transition (though in a call center, there's probably not much, if any, transition required), and be available to answer questions after you leave, to an extent, by providing a home email address (of course, don't work for them while you're working for someone else, and also don't spend hours and hours to help them, but still try to appear to be as available as possible).
Old 12-28-06, 05:13 PM
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Companies that do this are run by assholes. If THEIR people quit with little or no notice, they raise hell; but YOU'RE supposed to do it to someone else. Right.

I agree with the person who suggested you offer to train your replacement over the weekend. Burn no bridges. You never can tell when you'll need a good reference.
Old 12-28-06, 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by matta
That's illegal (assuming you're in the US). Once you give notice, they cannot fire you in retaliation. They can tell you to leave on the spot, then pay you until your resignation date, but they can't fire you without pay once you give notice.
I've always wondered about this. Florida is an at-will employment state. So, what is to prevent them for waiting a day and then firing you, and saying they were planning to do it all along?
Old 12-28-06, 10:14 PM
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You should give as much notice as you can, just common decency/respect. Of course, if the company didn't give you any, and you're not going to use them as a reference, there's generally no obligation to do so. Of course, most companies won't really say anything bad about you, for fear of lawsuits--when I managed a C-store, I was told I could praise all I wanted, but the most negative thing I could say was that i would not rehire the person [of course, that is pretty meaningful.]
I gave 12 hours notice one time. Same c-store, different location, my ass't manager quit on me on Sunday and I spend most of that Sunday in the back thinking. About 6 PM that night, when I left, I dropped my boss the DM a voicemail saying "She quit, I quit, as of now. The keys are in the safe, the combination is 1-2-3-4."
Went back in one time to get my last paycheck.

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