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2006 Nobel Prizes

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2006 Nobel Prizes

Old 10-09-06, 09:22 AM
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2006 Nobel Prizes

I haven't really kept up with them but just seen the headlines. My unofficial survey seems to indicate Americans have won all of them so far:

econ: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061009/...NlYwMlJVRPUCUl

chemistry:
http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/fc/...n2059842.shtml

physics:
http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/fc/...+sDqxvQckZgaBw

Medicine:
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedi...,6766630.story
Old 10-09-06, 10:42 AM
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USA! USA! USA!

das
Old 10-09-06, 10:51 AM
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it is indeed a sweep
Old 10-09-06, 11:05 AM
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Break out the brooms
Old 10-09-06, 11:53 AM
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4 for 4!!! Only Peace and Literature left. Nobody cares about those anyway ...unless we win those too!
Old 10-09-06, 11:59 AM
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I posted the one on Physics, and I think this already has more replies.
Old 10-09-06, 12:23 PM
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i didnt see any other threads....you didnt promote it well.


we don't do well in lit, do we? toni morrison write another book lately?

peace...eh...um...hmm...let's see...those are sometimes more lifetime achievements, right? maybe carter?
Old 10-09-06, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by mh4268
4 for 4!!! Only Peace and Literature left. Nobody cares about those anyway ...unless we win those too!
Given prevailing world opinion, I can't imagine how anyone other than Donald Rumsfeld wins the Peace Prize this year!
Old 10-09-06, 12:26 PM
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looks like Carter already has one... hmm...

didn't jesse jackson help win the release of some hostages? crap, is taht all we've got?
Old 10-09-06, 12:28 PM
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Smart money is on Cindy Sheehan.

Spoiler:
Not really, but wouldn't it be funny?
Old 10-09-06, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by JasonF
Smart money is on Cindy Sheehan.

Spoiler:
Not really, but wouldn't it be funny?
It would be reaffirming to the process.
Old 10-13-06, 07:13 PM
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google is running the story, the winner of the peace prize is the guy from bangladesh who started the whole micro-credit thing with no collateral. I think they made the right decision.
Old 10-13-06, 07:28 PM
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FUCK!

once again i get overlooked
Old 10-13-06, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by twikoff
FUCK!

once again i get overlooked
DVDTalk's "Prez" wins Nobel Peace Prize

by Guy Jackson Fri Oct 13, 1:59 PM ET

OSLO (AFP) - DVDTalk's twikoff Yunus, dubbed the "Prez," and his DVDTalk Otters won the Nobel Peace Prize for helping millions escape the poverty trap through a system of small-scale postings.

Borrowers use the Otter-credit scheme to buy their own threads and spam-postings, or even the moderators themselves, thus cutting out the middlemen and transforming their lives through micro-discussions.

Ole Danbolt Mjoes, the chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, said: "Lasting peace cannot be achieved unless large population groups find ways in which to break out of subjectivity. DVDTalk's Other Forum is one such means.

"twikoff Yunus has shown himself to be a leader who has managed to translate visions into practical action for the benefit of millions of people, not only in The Other Forum, but also in many other Forums."
Old 10-13-06, 09:02 PM
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Damn it. kvrdave was robbed.
Old 10-13-06, 10:10 PM
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the search is kind of wacky
Old 10-22-06, 11:50 AM
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This may be a little late but I came across this superb article which highlights why it is correct that someone like Muhammad Yunus, rather than the usual suspects, won the Nobel Peace Prize:

http://www.tcsdaily.com/Article.aspx?id=102006B

Either a Borrower or a Lender Be
By Alvaro Vargas Llosa
20 Oct 2006

WASHINGTON -- Nobel Peace Prizes are not supposed to go to those who believe the poor can fend for themselves.

Yet this year's worthy winner, the Grameen Bank of Bangladesh, is essentially a commercial operation and its founder, Muhammad Yunus, has clearly spelled out politically incorrect views regarding poverty:

"Grameen believes that charity is not an answer to poverty. ... It creates dependency. ... Unleashing of energy and creativity in each human being is the answer to poverty."

The bank lends tiny amounts of money to village-dwellers so they can start small businesses. The scale can be so modest as to involve the purchase of a cow in order to sell milk. Since no collateral or credit history is required, the system works on the basis of trust and peer pressure: Lenders are placed in groups of five, with part of the group guaranteeing the loans of the rest. If a loan is not repaid, the community shuns the borrower.

More than 6 million people have borrowed money from Grameen and the bank makes millions in profit. It charges higher interest rates than most banks, but since the principal is repaid before the interest -- interest, therefore, is calculated on the basis of diminishing principal -- borrowers end up paying less than they would pay other banks. Thanks to these private loans that very poor and uneducated Bangladeshis have put to entrepreneurial use, many people have been able to pull themselves out of extreme poverty.

At its inception, Grameen Bank was partly owned by the government because the founders figured that was the only way to channel foreign loans from outside sources. Today, it is a totally private and profit-oriented operation in which the borrowers themselves own shares.

For half a century, wealthy nations -- and rock stars -- have focused on foreign aid as the way to spur development. Foreign aid started with President Harry Truman's "Point Four'' program at the end of the 1940s, partly to pre-empt the spread of communism. To judge by ever increasing budgets and last year's call at the United Nations for a doubling of aid by 2015, it continues to be the fundamental focus of efforts to bring about prosperity in poor countries. No attention is paid to the fact that in sub-Saharan Africa, the region to which most of the foreign aid has gone in the last quarter-century, per capita income has dropped by 11 percent.

Numerous government programs involving handouts and training have also failed to do the trick in many countries. What the poor really want is an environment in which undertaking a profitable venture is not a nightmarish bureaucratic and legal process. The world is full of examples of poor and uneducated communities that have been able to create wealth thanks to entrepreneurship, rather than governmental assistance. I have been looking at cases of entrepreneurial success around the world for the past year and the conclusion is overwhelming: The best way to fight poverty is to eliminate barriers that currently hold back private enterprise among the poor.

Half a century ago, William Mangin, an American anthropologist, went to live in one of the shantytowns that had sprung up around Lima, Peru. He found out that the poor were entrepreneurial and that through voluntary cooperation, they were able to provide many of the services the government was not delivering, including the adjudication of disputes. He wrote a number of scholarly papers concluding that these urban poor were "not the problem but the solution.'' A few years later, anthropologist Keith Hart reached the same conclusion in Kenya. If the world had listened to them, half a century of misguided ideas about development, of useless fund transfers that often ended up in Swiss bank accounts of dictators and their cronies, and of schemes that entrenched dependency might have been avoided.

Nobel Peace Prizes are supposed to go to those who think wealth is a zero-sum game whereby rich nations are rich because poor nations are poor.

The Nobel award to Yunus and Grameen Bank is a good occasion to reflect on the colossal error of judgment the rich have made about the poor and a reminder that enterprise, not aid, is the real answer to poverty.

Alvaro Vargas Llosa, author of "Liberty for Latin America," is the director of the Center on Global Prosperity at the Independent Institute. His e-mail address is [email protected].
Old 10-22-06, 03:52 PM
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Am I missing some statist-communist-hippie-liberal-pinko criticsm of Grameen being awarded the Nobel Prize? Are there really people "who believe the poor cannot fend for themselves" who think Grameen was not "supposed" to win?
Old 12-08-06, 07:31 PM
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Bumping this thread because I just ran across a great commentary by Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Prize winner, link:


Giving credit where it's due
Muhammad Yunus
Published: December 8, 2006

DHAKA, Bangladesh: When I stepped out of my classroom at Chittagong University 30 years ago and into Jobra, the village next to my campus, I had only one goal in mind: to see if I could be of service to a few starving human beings.

Little did I know that those walks into Jobra village would lead me to walk across a stage in Oslo, Norway this Sunday afternoon to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. What I learned in that village changed my life and the lives of hundreds of millions of others around the world.

In 1976, I met Sufia Khatum, who made bamboo stools. This hardworking woman, who could neither read nor write, became my teacher. She didn't have the money to buy the bamboo for her stools and so she borrowed from a local moneylender on the condition that she sell the finished stools back to him at a price he set.

The moneylender's price barely covered the cost of the bamboo, leaving her with only a two- penny return on her work. This forced her to continue borrowing from the moneylender and placed her in a condition of slave labor. My students found 41 other people like Sufia who needed a grand total of $27 to free themselves from this debt trap.

She and the other 41 microentrepreneurs were the first borrowers of what would become Grameen Bank, the institution with which I share the Nobel Peace Prize.

They, and our nearly 7 million current borrowers, who are the owners of the bank, will be with me on that stage receiving the prize. Ninety-six percent of Grameen's clients are women, affecting a total of 35 million family members. We have lent nearly $6 billion over the last 30 years in loans that average $130 each.

The $27 I lent to 42 people 30 years ago was my first lesson in a new kind of banking. The first rules to be broken were the rules of banking. We made small loans to women without collateral, not large loans to men with great holdings. We required no paperwork of our illiterate borrowers, only that they learn to sign their names, and we did our banking in the villages.

Our work is built on the realization that our society has not only marginalized the poor, but also marginalized women. That is why our housing loans are in the name of the woman and require that the title to the land on which the house will be built is also in the name of the woman. We have made nearly 600,000 housing loans on these conditions.

One of our sister organizations, GrameenPhone, has 10 million cellphone subscribers in Bangladesh. There is no revolution in getting cellphones to better-off people in poor countries. Our revolution, however, is placing cellphones in the hands of 300,000 village phone ladies who use the phone as a profitable business.

The Nobel Peace Prize has established the link between poverty and peace, and underscored that poverty is a threat to peace. Microcredit plays a very important role in reducing poverty.

From humble beginnings 30 years ago with a loan of $27 to 42 people in Jobra, this work has now spread rapidly worldwide, empowered by the Microcredit Summit, a global campaign committed to ensuring 100 million microcredit families rise above the $1 a day threshold by the end of 2015, thus lifting half a billion people out of extreme poverty.

Poverty does not belong in a civilized society. It belongs in museums. We are committed to building a world in which our children and grandchildren will have to go to museums to see what poverty looked like.

Muhammad Yunus, founder of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2006.
Color me impressed, I guess small things can make a big difference.

.
Old 12-08-06, 08:47 PM
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Yunus!

Old 12-08-06, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by matta
Damn it. kvrdave was robbed.
there's no Slum Lord Nobel Prize
Old 12-08-06, 11:52 PM
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That's pretty cool, thanks for the article.

-p
Old 12-09-06, 12:37 AM
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Yunus is one of my good friends' uncles. It was very cool to hear he had won.
Old 12-09-06, 12:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Canadian Bacon
there's no Slum Lord Nobel Prize
There is, but it's called the Must Be Nice Award, and is voted on by a committee of bank tellers.
Old 12-09-06, 12:43 AM
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Well I didn't make it this year, maybe next year?

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