Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Other Talk
Reload this Page >

Photography lessons?

Other Talk "Otterville" plus Religion/Politics

Photography lessons?

Old 10-07-06, 02:21 PM
  #1  
DAC
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,664
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Photography lessons?

I know there are quite a few amature photographers and a few professional ones here. I really would like to get myself a DSLR and start learning the ropes. Through my work I have had some limited training, but as the saying goes if you don't use it you lose it. I have read through a lot of the DSLR threads about what cameras are good for the price etc. What I am wondering is how you all learned to take photos. Have you taken college courses? Online courses, read online free websites or just play around until you learn what you're doing?

I guess at this point in my life it would be a hobby, and to take pictures of my kids playing sports. I figure I have twelve years till I can retire and at that time it may (or may not) be something I'd be interested in doing to keep myself busy in my later years.

So, any suggestions?
Old 10-07-06, 02:33 PM
  #2  
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
movie diva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,365
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I went to school for photography, and worked in a professional lab for 15 years,and the best advice a teacher gave me was to take pictures all the time and just burn thru film (costly). Now with digital format it so much cheeper and fun also. So take a class learn the basics of lighting and technique and have fun.
Old 10-07-06, 02:44 PM
  #3  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Words
Posts: 28,207
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by movie diva
....take pictures all the time and just burn thru film (costly). Now with digital format it so much cheaper and fun also. So take a class learn the basics of lighting and technique and have fun.
Yup.

Read as much as you can. As you shoot, what you mean will make more sense.

-p
Old 10-07-06, 07:48 PM
  #4  
DAC
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,664
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
That makes sense. Ped, did you ever take a formal class or just read internet sites and such?
Old 10-08-06, 12:52 AM
  #5  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Lighten up, Francis! (Funland)
Posts: 26,856
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Save up your money and get an internship with zuffy.


I took a basic b&w course in college just cuz I needed that to take the color class and learn how to print color (ahh the old days). The color teacher just said "get in there and figure it out" so I dropped the class at mid-term.

I read some how-to books and learned working on the high school newspaper, etc. I also looked at a lot of magazines and books. That helped give me ideas.

Shoot, shoot, shoot. Go out early, late, after dark. Concentrate on learning light and composition. Capturing fleeting moments and emotion are a major step up although most people don't appreciate how hard that is to get or even value it.

You may never get to that point or even want to get to that point.

What kind of photos, subjects, themes interest you. Besides the kids playing sports.

You could just point the camera at some sunsets and you'll wow everyone.
Old 10-08-06, 01:07 AM
  #6  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 1,269
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I was also interested in taking a class, I haven't yet but I have taken plenty of pics with my cannon powershot A620, its nothing like the DSLRs but I like some of the things I can change with it.
Old 10-08-06, 01:24 AM
  #7  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Words
Posts: 28,207
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by DAC
That makes sense. Ped, did you ever take a formal class or just read internet sites and such?
I never took a class per se, but I had someone show me how to do film development (my introduction to the world of photography) Then I went digital, and since then I just read as much as I can. I love dpreview for equipment talk and shooting tips. I picked up a few technical magazines to work on specific stuff (macro, etc) I am still very much learning, and am still a neophyte with PS, which I think can make a world of difference.

HERE is some of my first stuff. The vast majority was just cropped and resized. I need to go back and work on the color saturation, touch up some of the uneven lighting, etc.

-p

Last edited by NotThatGuy; 10-08-06 at 01:27 AM.
Old 10-08-06, 03:07 AM
  #8  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,527
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I think in some ways, it's a disadvantage to learn on a DSLR because you all those buttons make it difficult to learn the very basics. Really, there are only 3 controllable parameters to every shot's exposure - shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Focus, doesn't really count because it doesn't affect your exposure. But once you realize that that is ALL that affects your photo, you realize that all the other fancy buttons and automatic controls on modern day DSLR's are just extra and unnecessary. They're basically there to adjust one of those 3 settings + focus. And if you know what you're doing and how those 3 parameters affect your shot, you will almost NEVER want the camera to decide those things for you. So learn about those 3 things to start with and everything else will fall into place. And remember one other thing - photography is all about LIGHT. There are lots of internet sites that will break down the basics for you. I would start there and ask questions on here if you'd like and any of us that have experience with photography can explain how it works. Getting the right exposure is just the first step though. Getting good photos requires being able to compose and to time the shot to get that "Kodak moment". You can't really learn that from reading (well, you can learn a bit about composition through reading) - that part you can only get by taking lots of shots and experimenting. Which is the major plus of DSLR's and having kids to experiment on.
Old 10-08-06, 07:08 AM
  #9  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
A-aron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Formerly known as achau9598 - Baltimore, MD
Posts: 5,719
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I've been going through my XTI stuff, and there is a small flyer online learning. It says it is free and even offers online seminars. So, you might be interested in that

www.photoworkshop.com/canon
Old 10-08-06, 11:07 AM
  #10  
DAC
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,664
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys. I figured it was more like practice, practice, practice.
Old 10-08-06, 05:18 PM
  #11  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Rampaging across DVDTalk.
Posts: 4,046
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Shoot in raw. I couldn't even tell you how many times it's saved me.
Old 10-08-06, 10:05 PM
  #12  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,527
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Fincher Fan
Shoot in raw. I couldn't even tell you how many times it's saved me.
I would say in the beginning, DON'T shoot in RAW. RAW is very forgiving of incorrect exposures. What you need in the beginning is a way of knowing when you took a bad shot. Plus, it adds other things like RAW processing to the learning curve which (IMO) is very low on the priority of things to learn to get good shots. Learn all about getting the proper exposure first. Learn how changing these different parameters affects the sharpness of your picture, and the depth of field. Until you FULLY understand how aperture, shutter speed, and ISO work and how they affect the picture, you shouldn't learn anything else.

My advice, shoot in JPG to start with. It's faster, the files are smaller, and microscopic artifacts should NOT be one of your concerns when you first start off.
Old 10-09-06, 12:46 AM
  #13  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Lighten up, Francis! (Funland)
Posts: 26,856
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I'll give hahn a Strong Agreement on that.
Old 10-11-06, 02:25 AM
  #14  
DAC
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,664
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts


I forget, what makes for a larger depth of field? f22 or f2.8?
Old 10-11-06, 07:13 PM
  #15  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Lighten up, Francis! (Funland)
Posts: 26,856
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
f22 will have more in focus.
Old 10-12-06, 01:58 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Detroit
Posts: 516
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by DAC
I know there are quite a few amature photographers and a few professional ones here. I really would like to get myself a DSLR and start learning the ropes. Through my work I have had some limited training, but as the saying goes if you don't use it you lose it. I have read through a lot of the DSLR threads about what cameras are good for the price etc. What I am wondering is how you all learned to take photos. Have you taken college courses? Online courses, read online free websites or just play around until you learn what you're doing?

I guess at this point in my life it would be a hobby, and to take pictures of my kids playing sports. I figure I have twelve years till I can retire and at that time it may (or may not) be something I'd be interested in doing to keep myself busy in my later years.

So, any suggestions?
I didnt realize so many people were into Photography on here. I have been in the business for around 6 years and went to school for 6 years prior to that for my education. I got my Bachelor's Degree in Fine Arts and my Masters Degree in Photography. Before I went to school I was into photography as a hobby off and on for about 4 years. I was in college for Envoronmental Engineering and absoltly hated it. I was about 9 months from graduating and realized I was going to spend my life doing math and that absolutly got me to switch into something I was more interested in which was photography.

Looking back it was the smartest move I ever made in my life as I am extremely happy with what I do. I started my own Architectural Photography business and have never looked back. Inow work around 75-90 days a year and have the rest of the time to myself. I wouldnt change a thing.

As for your interest in Photography, I would recommend getting a film camera myself and setting up a small darkroom somewhere in your house. The experience of shooting filming, developing it and actually printing your own pictures with an enlarger can never be replaced by digital. Yes digital is easier but not more rewarding. If your against going film, then obviously go the digital route and purchase photoshop with some key filter sets by Machine Wash and a few other of the big filter companies. Dont settle for anything except photoshop when it comes to the software you use to edit your pictures. There is no substitute.

Good luck and if you have any particular questions feel free to ask.

PS..

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.