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Turin or Torino? Which do you think is "right" for English speakers?

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View Poll Results: Turin or Torino, which should English speakers use?
Turin
12
26.67%
Torino
27
60.00%
Honestly, doesn't make a difference to me.
6
13.33%
Voters: 45. You may not vote on this poll

Turin or Torino? Which do you think is "right" for English speakers?

Old 02-20-06, 01:38 AM
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Turin or Torino? Which do you think is "right" for English speakers?

NBC keeps calling it Torino, the paper I read (Chicago Tribune) keeps calling it Turin and one Tribune columnist was making fun of NBC for calling Torino.

Which do you think is the right way to call the town, for an English speaking person? Torino is what the Italians call it, Turin is what it has historically been called in the English language.

And before you answer Torino, remember the "shroud of Turin"? "Shroud of Torino" doesn't have quite the same ring.

I still think we should just call it Torino and get rid of Turin. Too outdated. Kind of like New York and Nueva York. If I was in Mexico and heard somebody called the city "New York" I wouldn't say "no, no, call it Nueva York".

Last edited by Heat; 02-20-06 at 01:42 AM.
Old 02-20-06, 01:49 AM
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The fact that were allowed to change the names of different citys to suit our language is one of the most rediculous things on earth. Why the fuck do we get to call it Turin?

Well, Im off to see Spielberg's new movie..."Munchen"
Old 02-20-06, 02:01 AM
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I don't care either way what people call it. I like the sound of Torino more though. And every country has their own names for other cities and countries. We're not the only one that does it.
Old 02-20-06, 02:07 AM
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Here’s some more on the history of Turin (or Torino):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turin

…The population of Turin city is 908,000 (2004 census), but with its metropolitan area totals about 1.7 million inhabitants.

The city is also famous for being the film set of the 1969 classic film The Italian Job starring Michael Caine - it is possible to visit all the locations on a special tour…
Note that it says that in Piedmontese the name of the town is “Turin”. Again, from wikipedia:
Piedmontese (also known as Piemontèis, and Piemontese in Italian) is spoken by some 3 million people in Piedmont, northwest Italy. It is a western neo-latin language, like French, Provençal and Catalan (whereas Italian is an eastern neo-latin language, like Romanian). Linguists worldwide (e. g. Einar Haugen, Hans Göbl, Helmut Lüdtke, George Bossong, Klaus Bochmann, Karl Gebhardt, Guiu Sobiela Caanitz, Gianrenzo P. Clivio) acknowledge Piedmontese as an independent language, though in Italy it is often still considered an Italian dialect. Today it is not an official language…
So the name “Turin” apparently comes from Piedmontese.
Old 02-20-06, 02:17 AM
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Whatever the people who live in the area call it is what we should call it.
Old 02-20-06, 02:41 AM
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I'm an American, I pay my taxes, it's "Turin" as far as I'm concerned.
Old 02-20-06, 09:01 AM
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If we can just call cities whatever we want I'll be happy to call Reykjavík "R-Town" since that's easier to spell.
Old 02-20-06, 09:04 AM
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tv tells me to call it Torino, and tv wouldnt steer me wrong
Old 02-20-06, 09:31 AM
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Danzig - Gdansk
Peking - Beijing
Belorussia - Belarus

Place name changes happen every once in a while. I'll go on.

Last edited by EddieN; 02-20-06 at 09:34 AM.
Old 02-20-06, 09:35 AM
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I'm going to keep saying Turin, just as I keep saying Rome, Milan, Florence and Venice for other Italian cities.

Last edited by uberjoe; 02-20-06 at 10:50 AM.
Old 02-20-06, 09:38 AM
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Mmmmmm...

Old 02-20-06, 10:03 AM
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Let's just call it "New Aspen".
Old 02-20-06, 10:46 AM
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If I ever heard an English speaker pronounce "Paris" in the French way I'd have to punch them, so I'm going with "no" on this. Turin it remains.
Old 02-20-06, 10:57 AM
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I voted for Turino. I think NBC would seem even sillier if they kept using the Turin name when all the signs, banners, bibs, etc. all have 'Turino' emblazoned upon them.
Old 02-20-06, 11:15 AM
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I pronounce it Torino, but I a) speak a bit of Italian anyway and b) have an uncle who is from there. I don't really care how other people pronounce it.
Old 02-20-06, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by uberjoe
I'm going to keep saying Turin, just as I keep saying Rome, Milan, Florence and Venice for other Italian cities.
You mean Roma, Milano (mmm, cookies...), Firenze, Venezia and the left-out Napoli?
Old 02-20-06, 11:19 AM
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The AP guidebook says Turin
Old 02-20-06, 11:23 AM
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Indeed I do.

I think the only reason that Turin vs. Torino is an issue is because it's such a small place. I doubt any Americans would be that annoyed (or even notice) if television announcers called the city Rome instead of Roma.
Old 02-20-06, 12:29 PM
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If you are also using words like "Roma", "Milano" and "Italia" instead of "Rome", "Milan" and "Italy", then go ahead and feel free to say "Torino". But if you are only using the Italian word for that one particular place though and not the others, then that's kinda lame.
Old 02-20-06, 05:49 PM
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is this where that shroud is from? if it is, i've never heard it called the Shroud of Torino.
Old 02-20-06, 06:03 PM
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Either name is fine I think, as long as people understand.
Old 02-20-06, 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Jericho
You mean Roma, Milano (mmm, Alyssa...), Firenze, Venezia and the left-out Napoli?
Fixed
Old 02-20-06, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by TracerBullet
If I ever heard an English speaker pronounce "Paris" in the French way I'd have to punch them, so I'm going with "no" on this. Turin it remains.
Pronunciation is one thing...re-spelling it is different
Old 02-20-06, 07:39 PM
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local radio news is calling it Turin, and had a segment blabbering about the difference

but all the signs I see put up by the Olympic people themselves in the stadiums and along the side of the courses say Torino, so I say call it Torino
Old 02-20-06, 08:09 PM
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Wouldn't the city have had a say in how their name is spelled by the Olympic Committee?

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