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Home Renovatons...What is cheaper

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Home Renovatons...What is cheaper

Old 02-19-06, 05:05 PM
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Home Renovatons...What is cheaper

So, My wife and I disagree on a renovatoin plan for our home. The main goal is to get a master Bathroom out of the renovation.

She wants to take the current laundry area and split it in two as well as eliminate the current downstairs bathroom. Take one half and make is the master bath and the other piece make it the new laundry room. The biggest problem is that the entry way into the new bathroom will involve moving HVAC, duct returns and all the plumbing in the laundry room (which just so happens to be the main junction point for all plumbing in the house.

My idea is to build onto the house. Make the master bathroom a third bathroom and leave the current downstairs bathroom and laundry room alone.

I have jpg's of the plans but no where to host. If anyone would care to host them I can post the images.

Looking for opinions on what might be a cheaper or more sensible route.

Thanks!
Steak
Old 02-19-06, 05:09 PM
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Most pepole here host them at Imageshack. It's a free service.
Old 02-19-06, 05:11 PM
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If the costs are similar the house value would probably be higher with an extra bathroom as well as the extra square footage from adding on.
Old 02-19-06, 05:19 PM
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What type of foundation do you have?

If you have concrete foundation, it is generally very expensive to move plumbing. Not so bad if you have pier and beam.

$$ will really depend on how much structure you have to move. If by "re-model" you have to move weight bearing wall and roof structure (trusses/ceiling joists, etc), then I almost alway suggest adding on rather then moving these things. In this case, adding on should be cheaper.

But if you are not moving structure items, then remodel should be cheaper. Moving or adding non weight bearing walls is easy and cheap.

Last edited by Sdallnct; 02-19-06 at 05:24 PM.
Old 02-19-06, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Sdallnct
What type of foundation do you have?

If you have concrete foundation, it is generally very expensive to move plumbing. Not so bad if you have pier and beam.

$$ will really depend on how much structure you have to move. If by "re-model" you have to move weight bearing wall and roof structure (trusses/ceiling joists, etc), then I almost alway suggest adding on rather then moving these things. In this case, adding on should be cheaper.

But if you are not moving structure items, then remodel should be cheaper. Moving or adding non weight bearing walls is easy and cheap.
We have a concrete foundation. no load bearing walls are being touched in either plan.
Old 02-19-06, 06:20 PM
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Link to pics

http://www.photoape.com/album/index.cfm?albumID=1584

First is original.
Second is the wife's plan
Third is my plan
Old 02-19-06, 06:24 PM
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I agree with adding on. Sq footage adds value. It is dependant on the additional cost, but that is what I would do.

-p
Old 02-19-06, 06:56 PM
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Cutting the laundry room in half to make it a joint master bathroom is not very appealing. You should really have two bathrooms on a floor with three bedrooms, especially if one of those bedrooms is the master. This will tremendously help resale value, unless it is in an awful neighborhood, and the house is in a condition in which nothing can save it.
Old 02-19-06, 09:47 PM
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Well if you are not changing the structure, then yes from a pure cost it would be cheaper to cut the laundry room in half. However, I agree with other, having another bathroom on that floor would be a huge plus.

We bought a house 2 years ago built in '74 and it is a single story home with 4 bedrooms and 3 3/4 (3 full baths and one bath with shower/toilet/sink) baths. I thought we would never use them all! But we do. One is dedicated to guests, one is in the part of the house we have our kitchen and home theater, one is just for our 2 kids (it is a jack/jill bath so most unless you go thru one of the kids bedrooms you never see it) and the last is our master.

Before I gutted our kitchen I did a lot of research on remodeling. The rule is you will typically get your money back on remodeling of kitchen and baths and the rest you should remodel for your own benefit.
Old 02-19-06, 09:58 PM
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If you take away the other bathroom, where will the kids use the bathroom?
It kind of defeats the purpose of having a "master" bathroom if there isn't another regular bathroom on the same floor.
Old 02-20-06, 09:11 AM
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Removing bathromms is a shitty idea, pun intended.

Bathrooms add a ton of money to resale value. Eliminating a bathroom costs you anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000 around here, if not more. (There's tons of houses from the 1950's with 3 or 4 bedrooms and only 1 bathroom).

I have 4 bathrooms and wouldn't mind having another one. You can never have enough.
Old 02-20-06, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by The Bus
I have 4 bathrooms and wouldn't mind having another one. You can never have enough.
Yeah, you never know when that burrito loaded with jalepenos is going to hit you.
Old 02-20-06, 09:32 AM
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I like the third. just move the door going to the laundry room from the bedroom to the hallway. I would also consider a little different layout for the master bath. Its nice to have the toilet behind a closed door.

Why are your bedrooms on the lower level? Can you walk out to the yard or is it like a basement scenario. If you can walk out to the yard then it might be nice to put a french door going to the yard from the master bedroom.
Old 02-20-06, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by ANDREMIKE
I like the third. just move the door going to the laundry room from the bedroom to the hallway. I would also consider a little different layout for the master bath. Its nice to have the toilet behind a closed door.

Why are your bedrooms on the lower level? Can you walk out to the yard or is it like a basement scenario. If you can walk out to the yard then it might be nice to put a french door going to the yard from the master bedroom.
The original floor plan of the house was 4 bedrooms (2 on top and 2 on bottom). There was a family room/dining room combo L shaped room and then a rec room under that on the lower level. The 4 bedrooms were all about 12 x 12. The previous owner took the top floor bedrooms and combined them into one large rec room. Then they took the rec room from downstairs and turned it into a master bedroom and built a large walk-in closet.

All bedrooms are on the lower level. French doors to the back yard would be nice. I am just seeing the cost get higher and higher the more we do. Out to be fun to see what we actually end up with.
Old 02-20-06, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by The Bus
Removing bathromms is a shitty idea, pun intended.

Bathrooms add a ton of money to resale value. Eliminating a bathroom costs you anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000 around here, if not more. (There's tons of houses from the 1950's with 3 or 4 bedrooms and only 1 bathroom).

I have 4 bathrooms and wouldn't mind having another one. You can never have enough.
My wife prefers to not increase the size of the house, for her own reasons.
Old 02-20-06, 10:36 AM
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I would like to wade in on this discussion. I am a contractor and I do a lot of remodeling jobs. First, you need to set a spending limit and stick to it period! Once you set a budget fit the project in the budget, and the project should be 5,000 less then the budget itself. $5,000 is a modest cushion by the way. Why is this? Anytime you go into remodeling you never know what will be behind those walls, what will need to be fixed or a what other surprises come up. Contractors like remodeling projects becuase we make more money then builoding a new house! Why takes longer, got rip stuff apart put back together and stuff. I have seen far to many do it yourselfers get started and the budget begins to control the project and they end up in a pile of finacial problems. Cost wise adding on is always cheaper, less garbage to haul away, no demolition time. If your redoing bathroom work your getting into a whole mess of plumbing issues as well. I don't know what state your in, but make sure you know the codes to. Talk to your inspectors, find out what they look for. Inspectors always look for different types of things. If your in Michigan I be happy to help out, my prices are fair and I have some before and after picks I can show you. Remember the budget controls the project and 5,000 less then the total project at least that. $8,000 is a decent comfort zone.
Old 02-20-06, 02:40 PM
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Go with the addition! You get another bedroom and Bathroon (more $$ into the equity of your home over the years)

I have another idea if $$ is an issue. Why don't you make your closet into part of the bathroom and the other part as well as a new closet will come from the laundry room.
Old 02-20-06, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by themovieguru
I would like to wade in on this discussion. I am a contractor and I do a lot of remodeling jobs. First, you need to set a spending limit and stick to it period! Once you set a budget fit the project in the budget, and the project should be 5,000 less then the budget itself. $5,000 is a modest cushion by the way. Why is this? Anytime you go into remodeling you never know what will be behind those walls, what will need to be fixed or a what other surprises come up. Contractors like remodeling projects becuase we make more money then builoding a new house! Why takes longer, got rip stuff apart put back together and stuff. I have seen far to many do it yourselfers get started and the budget begins to control the project and they end up in a pile of finacial problems. Cost wise adding on is always cheaper, less garbage to haul away, no demolition time. If your redoing bathroom work your getting into a whole mess of plumbing issues as well. I don't know what state your in, but make sure you know the codes to. Talk to your inspectors, find out what they look for. Inspectors always look for different types of things. If your in Michigan I be happy to help out, my prices are fair and I have some before and after picks I can show you. Remember the budget controls the project and 5,000 less then the total project at least that. $8,000 is a decent comfort zone.
Thank you for this information. It is most helpfull.
Old 02-20-06, 09:05 PM
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Whatever you decide to do, be sure and contact your insurance agent. Major changes like this mean it is time to have to policy reviewed to make sure you are properly covered.
Old 02-21-06, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Sdallnct
Whatever you decide to do, be sure and contact your insurance agent. Major changes like this mean it is time to have to policy reviewed to make sure you are properly covered.
Great point!

Thanks.
Old 02-21-06, 09:27 AM
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Can you redraw a plan were you add another bathroom. Make the laundry room smaller and change the closet around and you can get a second bath. You could even think about adding a tub in the bedroom part.

Your not gaining anything by moving the bathroom. Adding a second would be ideal.
Old 02-21-06, 11:08 AM
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Three words: Don't. Move. Plumbing.

Not if you don't have to, anyway
Old 02-21-06, 12:12 PM
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I'll defer to the homeowners here for the actual costs, but my question is, if you remove the downstairs bathroom, does that mean you'll have to send guests upstairs? Most houses have at least a powder room (basin and commode) on the main floor for guests. I definitely wouldn't remove that if there were no other facilities for guests.
Old 02-21-06, 01:55 PM
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I would like to add one more point. Mentally prepare yourself when you begin remodeling. No matter how good it looks on paper or how new the house is, there is always snags and setbacks or something doesn't fit right. A good carpenter knows this. Remodeling can be both mentally and physically taxing on a family. I always make my customers aware of this before we start. Have fun!!!!!!!!!!!!
Old 02-21-06, 05:06 PM
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If you have a homeowners association, make sure you check with them first. Some don't allow building on/extending your home, or are very specific with their conditions to do so.
I would lean toward not removing the bathroom, and adding on. Bathrooms are good, and it sounds like you might be overusing the space; plus, all that HVAC and plumbing would probably be quite expensive and a pain to reroute/move/etc.

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