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Cooking omelettes in non-non-stick pans: What the heck?

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Cooking omelettes in non-non-stick pans: What the heck?

Old 01-02-06, 12:55 PM
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Cooking omelettes in non-non-stick pans: What the heck?

I've been using a handy non-stick pan to cook omelettes for years and have it down to a science. We got a lovely set of stainless steel pots and pans and I tried making my signature omlettes in them and ended up with a totally disgusting mess. What the hell? I'm definitely keeping my non-stick for eggs but I'd like to know what I did wrong. Anyone have a tough time going from non-stick to non-non-stick?
Old 01-02-06, 01:01 PM
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Add a bit of butter, adjust the heat accordingly (traditionally an omlette should be slightly under-cooked and slightly runny when it leaves the pan, and it will finish the last bit of cooking on the plate). Many problems happen when you don't cook the eggs right.

I use stainless steel pans for everything, thouhg have a non-stick pan that I use for omlettes. I can use my stainless steel pan for omlettes, but i'm usually lazy and use the non-stick one.

-p
Old 01-02-06, 01:26 PM
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Lower the heat and use butter, and lots of it.
Old 01-02-06, 01:52 PM
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How is this different from cooking anything else in a non-non-stick pan? You have to add oil or butter.
Old 01-02-06, 01:54 PM
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The only non-stick cookware I own is an omlette pan. The rest is commercial stainless. I could never master omlette making without a non-stick pan.

Sonic
Old 01-02-06, 02:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Gil Jawetz
I've been using a handy non-stick pan to cook omelettes for years and have it down to a science. We got a lovely set of stainless steel pots and pans and I tried making my signature omlettes in them and ended up with a totally disgusting mess. What the hell? I'm definitely keeping my non-stick for eggs but I'd like to know what I did wrong. Anyone have a tough time going from non-stick to non-non-stick?

To be fair, you're going from two different pans with different properties.

If you've cooked with one doing omeletes for a long time and then switch over you're going to get growing pains and learning curves.

This is more than just "add butter/oil" and "adjust".
Old 01-02-06, 03:12 PM
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A good omelette pan is a sacred thing. Don't mess with it. I have a stainless steel pan that I have seasoned well, and it is perfect for omelettes. I don't cook anything else in it, and it never gets put in the sink. A wipe out with paper towels, while it is still hot, is all it ever needs for cleaning.

If I am going to cook an omelette somewhere else, I bring the pan.

If you have a pan that works, that you are used to, then just keep using that pan.
Old 01-02-06, 03:22 PM
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I did use olive oil but I think I'll use butter next time. Thanks for all the advice. I will persevere!
Old 01-02-06, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by bill_n_opus
This is more than just "add butter/oil" and "adjust".
Yeah, but it's a good place to start !!
Old 01-02-06, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Mrs. Danger
I have a stainless steel pan that I have seasoned well, and it is perfect for omelettes. I don't cook anything else in it, and it never gets put in the sink. A wipe out with paper towels, while it is still hot, is all it ever needs for cleaning.
Maybe you know something about cooking that I don't, but, are you perhaps talking about cast iron, not stainless?

Last edited by Y2K Falcon; 01-02-06 at 03:32 PM.
Old 01-02-06, 03:31 PM
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What's the advantage of a non-non-stick pan? I hate cooking in non-non-stick and use non-stick for pretty much everything now. Is there something I should be aware of?
Old 01-02-06, 03:40 PM
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Steel or cast iron are thicker, and you can get more even heating. You can season steel like iron.

It takes practice to get the hang of cooking in real pots, but it's worth it if you like your food.
Old 01-02-06, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Mrs. Danger
You can season steel like iron.
I was not aware that you could do this... Everything I have ever read says otherwise. This is stainless without a non-stick surface? I'd always heard stainless wasn't porous enough.





Thor:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...DGMFD2KM01.DTL

http://www.kitchenemporium.com/info/cookmaterial.html
Old 01-02-06, 04:47 PM
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Alton Brown from Good Eats fame says to keep one cheap non-stick pan around for omlettes.

I have a stainless Calphalon set and love it, but eggs are a bitch.
Old 01-02-06, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Thor Simpson
How is this different from cooking anything else in a non-non-stick pan? You have to add oil or butter.
It's different because an omelet is generally cooked at medium to low heat, making it more likely to stick to the pan than something that's seared off quickly.
Old 01-02-06, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Mrs. Danger
Steel or cast iron are thicker, and you can get more even heating. You can season steel like iron.

It takes practice to get the hang of cooking in real pots, but it's worth it if you like your food.


What she said.
Old 01-02-06, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by dork
It's different because an omelet is generally cooked at medium to low heat, making it more likely to stick to the pan than something that's seared off quickly.
Zing! dork strikes again!
Old 01-02-06, 05:32 PM
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Yeah, keep the non-stick for the omelletes. I mean you can do it without, but why? We got a nice non-stick pan for christmas because our old one was giving everyone who ate an omellette out of it cancer from all the tefelon scratchings.
Old 01-02-06, 05:37 PM
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Omlettes are the easiest way to get frustrated at cooking. If it all goes to hell, you get a jumbled mess of scrambled eggs. That doesn't work if you were in the mood for an omlette. Keep the non-stick pan for them, and enjoy your breakfasts.
Old 01-02-06, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Mrs. Danger
Steel or cast iron are thicker, and you can get more even heating.
You can also brown much better in a non-nonstick pan. I don't make omlettes, but I do scramble eggs in my cast iron.

Cast iron also lasts forever, and you never get teflon flakes in your food,
Old 01-02-06, 08:45 PM
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Why season a pan when you can just season your food?

Meh... non-stick works fine for me. I'm sure some day when I'm a bit more "refined" I will have both non-stick and yes-stick pans.

The only non-stick thing we have is a wok, and it's such a pain to clean after cooking that I now do most of my stir-fry in a non-stick pan any way.
Old 01-02-06, 09:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Thor Simpson
Why season a pan when you can just season your food?

Meh... non-stick works fine for me. I'm sure some day when I'm a bit more "refined" I will have both non-stick and yes-stick pans.

The only non-stick thing we have is a wok, and it's such a pain to clean after cooking that I now do most of my stir-fry in a non-stick pan any way.
As you probably know, "seasoning" a pan involves filling up the pores of its surface by repeatedly heating fats on it and has nothing to do with the seasonings you put on food. For example, had your wok been properly seasoned it would not be a pain to clean.
Old 01-03-06, 01:58 AM
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Is this thing any good? I saw it in an informercial a couple of months ago and I was intrigued: http://www.whatsinnow.net/Cooking/fl...omeletpan.html
Old 01-03-06, 02:02 AM
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If you add a certain amount of olive oil, heat it, then add butter, your omlettes will turn out ok in non-stick pans.

Secret: The olive oil prevents the omlette from not only sticking to the pan, but enables the butter from turning that disgusting brown and icky color.
Old 01-03-06, 11:18 AM
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If it turns brown (the butter)....your pan is too hot.

-p

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