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Why do people that aren't British use the term "bloody"?

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Why do people that aren't British use the term "bloody"?

Old 12-20-05, 12:22 PM
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Why do people that aren't British use the term "bloody"?

"The problem would be solved if Warner would have put a bloody insert in the case!!"

It's annoying. Please stop it. You aren't British so stop using their terminology. You might as well say that a lorry dented your bonnet in the car park this morning. Or your mum brought you some new knickers for christmas. I see people use it and then wonder where they are from hoping they might be from England and then find out they are from Pittsburgh or some shit. STOP IT. If not for me then for the bloody children. /rant.
Old 12-20-05, 12:23 PM
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I think it is to sound smart and intelligent... I give Madonna as Exhibit A
Old 12-20-05, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Mopower
"The problem would be solved if Warner would have put a bloody insert in the case!!"
Were they talking about Saw?
Old 12-20-05, 12:27 PM
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Why the 'el did oye open this bleedin' thread?
Old 12-20-05, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by j123vt_99
I think it is to sound smart and intelligent... I give Madonna as Exhibit A

Madonna is a wanker.
Old 12-20-05, 12:27 PM
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I agree. Because we've never incorporated a foreign word or phrase in American English, and now is not the time to start!
Old 12-20-05, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Mopower
"The problem would be solved if Warner would have put a bloody insert in the case!!"

It's annoying. Please stop it. You aren't British so stop using their terminology. You might as well say that a lorry dented your bonnet in the car park this morning. Or your mum brought you some new knickers for christmas. I see people use it and then wonder where they are from hoping they might be from England and then find out they are from Pittsburgh or some shit. STOP IT. If not for me then for the bloody children. /rant.
Bollocks!
Old 12-20-05, 12:30 PM
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Whew, it just felt good to get that out there.
Old 12-20-05, 12:33 PM
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Because they can.
Old 12-20-05, 12:34 PM
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"Piss off the lot of you, wankers!"

Side note: I had to inform my daughter that "bloody" was not a very polite word in England. She wondered why, since it was used so frequently in the Harry Potter films.
Old 12-20-05, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by parker63
Side note: I had to inform my daughter that "bloody" was not a very polite word in England. She wondered why, since it was used so frequently in the Harry Potter films.
Do they bleep it in the UK? Or let this "offensive" word stand in a kids movie...
Old 12-20-05, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Y2K Falcon
Do they bleep it in the UK? Or let this "offensive" word stand in a kids movie...
No, but when they show it on TV they dub over it with "motherfucking".
Old 12-20-05, 12:50 PM
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Let's see:

1. Brits and Americans share a common language
2. We watch each others' movies and TV shows
3. People (gasp!) actually move between and visit other countries.

It's normal to pick up slang, even unintentionally. There are many British terms and colloquialisms I use quite unintentionally, especially in the context of soccer. I call the sport itself "footie" and I use the term "physio" in place of physical trainer or team doctor. In other words, my vocabulary is colored by my environment, and my environment is not hermetically sealed at my country's geographic borders.
Old 12-20-05, 12:51 PM
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Because they suck.
Old 12-20-05, 12:53 PM
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Hey, I'm not making it up. No, no as bad as "fucking" but it is considered "mildy offensive".

1) Complaint of a broadcast using the word "bloody":

http://www.bsa.govt.nz/decisions/2005/2005-054.htm

...and from the "English to American Dictionary"

bloody expl. Damn, another tricky word to define. Bloody is another great British multi-purpose swear word. Most well known as part of the phrase "Bloody hell!" which could best be described as an exclamation of surprise, shock or anger. Bloody can also be used in the middle of sentences for emphasis in a similar way to the ubiquitious f--- word ("And then he had the cheek to call me a bloody liar!") or even with particular audacity in the middle of words ("Who does she think she is, Cinde-bloody-rella?"). I am reliably informed by a contributor that bloody is in fact nothing to do with blood and actually a contraction of the phrase "by Our Lady". Sometimes I wonder whether it's worth putting in all these useful linguistic derivations when in actual fact you only got here because you were wondering what a poof was.

http://english2american.com/dictionary/cat_insults.html
Old 12-20-05, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by parker63
....because you were wondering what a poof was.
I'm pretty sure that means "tourists"...
Old 12-20-05, 12:59 PM
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I've never heard anyone from Britain use the term 'poof' or 'poofter', except in old movies or TV shows. I wonder how many Americans use British slang the Brits don't even use anymore.
Old 12-20-05, 01:01 PM
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I agree, if you're not from the country, don't use the slang.
Old 12-20-05, 01:02 PM
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Perhaps the OP is just taking the piss.
Old 12-20-05, 01:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Fok
I agree, if you're not from the country, don't use the slang.
Shall we tell that to the millions of Brits who use American slang on a daily basis? Or is that lot just a bunch of pretentious twits, and so we should just jolly well bugger off?
Old 12-20-05, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Fok
I agree, if you're not from the country, don't use the slang.
Yeah, don't be a hoser, eh?
Old 12-20-05, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by wendersfan
Shall we tell that to the millions of Brits who use American slang on a daily basis? Or is that lot just a bunch of pretentious twits, and so we should just jolly well bugger off?
Well if they are using American slang then it is obviously ok.
Old 12-20-05, 01:11 PM
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I've been using it off and on since I was 15 or so and lived in England as an exchange student. You want me to stop? Bloody well make me.
Old 12-20-05, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandoman
I agree. Because we've never incorporated a foreign word or phrase in American English, and now is not the time to start!
Old 12-20-05, 01:15 PM
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'ello Guvner. I've a rumble in me gulliver.

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