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Someone patents warp drive

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Someone patents warp drive

Old 11-12-05, 09:54 PM
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Someone patents warp drive

This is why I want a job as a patent clerk, all you do is stamp approved on everything.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...nk_patent.html


Antigravity Machine Patent Draws Physicists' Ire
Brian Handwerk
for National Geographic News
November 11, 2005

A perpetual-motion machine may defy the laws of physics, but an Indiana inventor recently succeeded in having one patented.

On November 1 Boris Volfson of Huntington, Indiana, received U.S. Patent 6,960,975 for his design of an antigravity space vehicle.

Volfson's craft is theoretically powered by a superconductor shield that changes the space-time continuum in such a way that it defies gravity. The design effectively creates a perpetual-motion machine, which physicists consider an impossible device.

Journalist Philip Ball reported on the newly patented craft in the current issue of the science journal Nature.

Robert Park, a consultant with the American Physical Society in Washington, D.C., warns that such dubious patents aren't limited to the antigravity concept.

"I might hear a complaint about a particular patent, and then I look into it," he explained. "More often than not it's a screwball patent. It's an old problem, but it has gotten worse in the last few years. The workload of the patent office has gone up enormously."

Some people might consider patents on unworkable products to be relatively harmless. Park, a physics professor at the University of Maryland at College Park, disagrees.

"The problem, of course, it that this deceives a lot of investors," he said. "You can't go out and find investors for a new invention until you can come up with a patent to show that if you put all this money into a concept, somebody else can't steal the idea.

"[Approving these kind of patents can] make it easier for scam artists to con people if they can get patents for screwball ideas."

Perpetual Quest

Perpetual-motion machines have long held special appeal for inventors—particularly during the concept's heyday around the turn of the 20th century.

Patent applications on such devices became so numerous that by 1911 the patent office instituted a rule that perpetual-motion machine concepts had to be accompanied by a model that could run in the office for a period of one year.

The model requirement has been discontinued, but the agency has remained skeptical of such applications.

"The patent office used to say that they didn't patent perpetual-motion machines, but it turned out that there really was no such rule," Park said.

A 1990 federal court ruling against inventor Joe Newman, who applied for a patent on a motor that he said could return more energy than it consumed, was interpreted as precluding patents for such devices.

But the verdict has not fully stemmed the tide of applications.

"The effect that [the court ruling] has had is that patent seekers no longer call them perpetual-motion machines," Park said. "Now it's called capturing zero-point energy."

Zero-point energy is a real type of energy produced by the miniscule movements of molecules at rest. Harnessing this energy is theoretically possible, but the task seems, at least for the moment, practically impossible.

Patent Review

When asked about Volfson's machine, a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) spokesperson said the agency does not discuss specific patents. But the spokesperson explained that qualified patent examiners review each application according to rigid criteria.

First the idea must be patentable by law, said Brigid Quinn of the USPTO, based in Alexandria, Virginia. "There is patent law that describes what is patentable subject matter—for example, the laws of nature aren't patentable."

If an idea passes legal muster it must then meet several specific criteria.

"Is it new?" Quinn asked. "Is it useful, which means does it work? Is it nonobvious? And is it described in such detail to enable someone skilled in that technology to make and use it based on the description that must accompany the application?"

Patent office scientists and engineers, skilled in particular technologies, make their determinations based on these criteria and the current state of the science involved.

But despite their best efforts, mistakes are inevitable and patents may be granted to unworkable ideas. Some 5,000 examiners must currently handle a load of 350,000 applications per year.

Meanwhile, no amount of nay-saying will stop inventors from dreaming of a legitimate perpetual-motion breakthrough. Park believes that these hopefuls far outweigh any ill-meaning scammers.

"The most curious aspect of this is that most of these people truly believe that they've made some new discovery that most people haven't thought of," he said. "It doesn't often work out."
Old 11-12-05, 10:07 PM
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Ya know, I just sat through an IP seminar at work run by a patent attourney and the way he explained things to us was that you cannot receive a full blown patent without a working device. I'll have to ask him about this one.
Old 11-12-05, 10:12 PM
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So, in the future you use a warp drive to go back in time and patent a warp drive before this guy does.
Old 11-12-05, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by DVD Polizei
So, in the future you use a warp drive to go back in time and patent a warp drive before this guy does.
Or in addition to the patent, dress up in leather w/shades and go after his mom... just to be sure.
Old 11-12-05, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by TomOpus
Or in addition to the patent, dress up in leather w/shades and go after his mom... just to be sure.
Well, yeah!
Old 11-12-05, 11:03 PM
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Won't mean a thing until someone patents inertial dampers.
Old 11-12-05, 11:17 PM
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Originally Posted by wendersfan
Won't mean a thing until someone patents inertial dampers.
Lol, great comment.

But ya, Apparently a scientist was really ripshit about this because it isn't patentable, and is more likely than not for use by some scam artist who can use the patent as proof for venture capatalists to hand him money.
Old 11-12-05, 11:17 PM
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<--- pat. pend.
Old 11-12-05, 11:43 PM
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some people have too much time on their hands
Old 11-13-05, 12:46 AM
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Originally Posted by wendersfan
Won't mean a thing until someone patents inertial dampers.

Are you mocking me, sir????



Old 11-13-05, 12:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Fok
some people have too much time on their hands
Yep
Old 11-13-05, 09:05 AM
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they should have sat on this

what are the chances that someone builds this in the next 18 years?
Old 11-13-05, 09:31 AM
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So there are 350,000 applications and 5,000 people to work them. That means they can devote about 30 hours to each one. How is that overloaded? This one should take 10 seconds to put it in the circular file.
Old 11-13-05, 09:39 AM
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not to be a nerd, or anything, but technically speaking, he didn't patent a WARP drive. he patented a perpetual motion machine. warping is something very much different than perpetual motion...

whereas warping involves the manipulation of the shape of the universe, perpetual motion is continuous motion without energy loss.

from Wikipedia:

Perpetual motion refers to a condition in which work is done without an energy source. Perpetual motion machines (the Latin term perpetuum mobile is not uncommon) are a class of hypothetical machines which would produce useful energy in a way which would violate the established laws of physics. It is generally accepted that perpetual motion machines cannot work. In particular, perpetual motion machines would violate either the first or second laws of thermodynamics. Perpetual motion machines are divided into two subcategories defined by which law of thermodynamics would have to be broken in order for the device to be a true perpetual motion machine.

And warp: The physicist Miguel Alcubierre proposed a method of stretching space in a wave, causing the space "ahead" of a spacecraft to contract along the axis the spacecraft wishes to travel in and the space "behind" it to expand. The ship would ride this wave inside a region, known as a "warp bubble", of flat space. Since the ship is not actually moving within this bubble, but rather being carried along as the region itself moves, conventional relativistic effects do not apply. There is no known way to induce such a wave, however, or to leave it once started; the Alcubierre drive remains a theoretical concept at this time.

-di doctor-
Old 11-14-05, 12:09 AM
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That Patent won't do shit unless they get the tractor beam out of commision



Old 11-14-05, 12:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Cameron
That Patent won't do shit unless they get the tractor beam out of commision



HAHAHA You silly fool! That's the hyper drive!
Old 11-14-05, 12:57 AM
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yah...i was reaching...
Old 11-14-05, 12:58 AM
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Haha! The joke is on him - I patented warp speed!

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