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Installing Baseboard - Help a Brutha Out..

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Installing Baseboard - Help a Brutha Out..

Old 10-03-05, 03:07 PM
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Installing Baseboard - Help a Brutha Out..

Just finished installing my lamanite flooring and I'm moving on to the baseboard..

I've googled as much as I care to and can't find an easy explanation. Could

For inside corners... Do I just make inside 45* bevel cuts? Then for outer corners do I just make outter 45* bevel cuts?

Someone please break it down nice and easy for me.

Thanks
Old 10-03-05, 03:11 PM
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that sounds right. (i installed pergo almost 6 years ago and still havent put all my baseboarding up)
Old 10-03-05, 03:50 PM
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Note: For most inside corners, use two 45-degree inside cuts. If your corner isn't square, you'll need to cut one piece of molding at a 90-degree angle and use a coping saw to trim the other piece for a proper fit. To cope the molding, cut a 45-degree outside cut on the molding. Then back-cut the molding on an inside 45-degree angle along the edge of the mitered cut (figure E). When you're finished, file the edges smooth for a tight fit.

http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/dr_rep...269789,00.html
Old 10-03-05, 08:08 PM
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this is the obligatory "measure twice, cut once" comment.
Old 10-04-05, 03:07 AM
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It's not that hard, especially if you're painting the baseboard. If things aren't totally square, just cut them at 45's and then run a bead of caulk in the resulting space and run a finger up the seam. In most cases, that'll cover any inconsistencies that anyone would notice after it's painted.
Old 10-04-05, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by monkeyboy
It's not that hard, especially if you're painting the baseboard. If things aren't totally square, just cut them at 45's and then run a bead of caulk in the resulting space and run a finger up the seam. In most cases, that'll cover any inconsistencies that anyone would notice after it's painted.
That's a good idea and what I'll end up doing.. The first corner I did has a slight gap..

Question.. How do I get precise measurements when doing corners? For example. I made an inside miter and installed one of the corners. This leaves me with a piece that will nudge up against door casing on one end and the other end goes to join the miter. If I measure from the wall to the casing and mark the line it will be too long because the miter extends the cut line. What I need to know is how much to subtract so the measurement will end at the miter and not at the cut line.

Am I making sense?
Old 10-04-05, 10:22 AM
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I always make an initial cut a little bit longer than the true length. This allows you to measure the point where the mitre starts. I know there is some formula to figure what distance the cut line on the top of the baseboard is compared to the back in relation to cut angle/thickness etc.., just seems like too much to screw around with.
Old 10-04-05, 10:26 AM
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Great idea! So I make the cut a little longer, go "rough" fit the piece in place, and then mark the line where I need to make just a straight cut to get it flush up against the casing.. That will work!

But... How about when I'm making a long run and need two pieces of base. This will require two mitered cuts. One for the corner on one side and the other side to join up with the piece already there.
Old 10-04-05, 12:27 PM
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I'm not sure what your asking there. On a long run, the first piece you'd cut with 2 'open 45's, one goes into the corner and the otherlands wherever it lands. Your next piece(say it reaches the next corner) would have a closed 45 that overlaps the open one in the middle and then an open 45 that goes into the corner. Does that make sense? You don't want to use butt joints anywhere when joining trim.

As far as measuring and cutting, you can certainly use the rough cut method and eventually get a piece that fits. But you should be able to use marks as well, assuming your saw cuts 45's in both directions, which it should. When you make you marks, whether it's an inside or outside mark you should be able to eye it up on the saw and make the cut. Sometimes you may need to transfer the line to the opposite side of the trim to make it work. Maybe I'm not understanding your question.
Old 10-04-05, 01:52 PM
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The sliding compound miter saw I'm using isn't a dual bevel. It tilts to 45* but only on one side.. Now it can go to 45* left and right but that's if I was cutting the baseboard standing up. The baseboard is too high to cut it standing up so I have to lay it flat and put the saw at the 45* bevel. To make a cut the other way I have to flip the base over.

I hope I'm doing it right...

You are understanding what I was asking.. Your first paragraph is exactly what I meant. I was just wondering how to get a precise measurement for that.
Old 10-05-05, 02:15 AM
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Originally Posted by tbird2340
I hope I'm doing it right...

You are understanding what I was asking.. Your first paragraph is exactly what I meant. I was just wondering how to get a precise measurement for that.
I see, I didn't realize you were cutting it flat, that certainly makes it a lot harder to make precise marks and cuts. I'm sure you're probably done with it now. It sounds like you have a pretty good grasp on things now.
Old 10-05-05, 07:33 AM
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Actually, I'm not done with it. My brother in law needed his saw back so I just bought one on eBay that should be here tomorrow. This is the one I bought. It's a Dewalt DW712 8/12" Sliding Compound Miter Saw.



So you thought I was standing the base up and cutting. Yes, that would be A LOT easier. I tested cutting with the old baseboard which was shorter. The base we got is a lot taller.. What do people usually do?

Thanks for the help.
Old 10-05-05, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by tbird2340
So you thought I was standing the base up and cutting. Yes, that would be A LOT easier. I tested cutting with the old baseboard which was shorter. The base we got is a lot taller.. What do people usually do?

Thanks for the help.
You're doing it the right way for trim that's too tall to chop vertically, it just sucks when you have to go that route. The problem with cutting it the way you are, aside from not being able to hit marks precisely, is that the wood has a tendency to slide on the table as you're pushing the blade through which can result in crooked cuts, but if you're going the caulk route, you should be fine.

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